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GeeBee

RO# 385



Posted - Aug 02 2007 :  21:21:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You neglected to say if you had an anchor, an essential piece of equipment, but I then I remembered, you don't have one

"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Homeport: Lake Lanier, GA Go to Top of Page

Bill D.

RO# 150



Posted - Aug 02 2007 :  21:27:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good One GeeBee, probably the best in the thread!

"The urge to save humanity is almost always a false face for the urge to rule it." Henry Louis Mencken (1880 - 1956)
PETA now selling "I hate Bill D." T-shirts

Homeport: Gulf Shores, Alabama Go to Top of Page

Radioactive

RO# 3238



Posted - Aug 02 2007 :  21:30:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob, the answer is simple ( it is also one you have received before ): You are asking the wrong question. The correct question should be, "Am I qualified to perform this action?"

Bill

"No matter where you go, there you are." -- Buckaroo Bonzai
"There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." - Kenneth Grahame

Homeport: MS Gulf Coast Go to Top of Page

Ocean Spray

RO# 20033

Posted - Aug 02 2007 :  21:49:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OMG! Bob, Just go out and buy a BIGGER BOAT! LOL!

Ocean Spray II
Captain Pat

Homeport: Sarasota, Florida Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Aug 02 2007 :  22:11:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
geebee... his boat passed a VSC, you don't need an anchor to pass a VSC :-)

Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 02 2007 :  22:15:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
FYI, no family on board, just me and my somewhat lesser experienced buddy. I didn't know it was called "broaching" but I was concerned about being perpedicular to the rollers, so I made sure I never got that way. This was my first time through the inlet, but I cruised by it a few times last year (chickened out), then this year did some more serious recon before going through. I would estimate that the height of the LARGEST wave/roller was probably 3 feet tall. They seemed rather far apart, I'd guess about 30 yards or so. I did say it felt like the bow was too low, but only because on the way out (running against the incomming tide), I was able to keep the bow up REAL high, and that made me feel like I had more control, and less chance of a wave coming over the bow. I was somewhat prepared for the waves, in that I knew I wanted to keep the bow up, but on the way back it, I felt that I couldn't keep it up as much as I could on the way out.

Brett, I wasn't out to "prove" you wrong, I just wanted a quantitative opinion on whether or not I was reckless. Contrary to what some believe, I do value the opinion of many on this board, and I HAVE learned from these threads and other in the past!


-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

Hyperfishing

RO# 3223

Posted - Aug 02 2007 :  22:39:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Papillon wrote: "You'll be safe most of the time, yes. But when any number of unpredictable and independent variables align themselves, you'll be dead in a 20' bowrider. It is just a matter of time."

Yeah, it will take me a long time to forget the "watch for floating body" Coast Guard message on 16,
when a 21 foot long FISHING BOAT flipped over in Jones Inlet. Three guys were dumped into the sea, and the Coast Guard was only able to rescue two, while injuring several Coast Guard heros in the fast flowing inlet tidal rip.

I have seen too many dead bodies in the water, even picking up body parts (human brains look like hamburger), to take this thread lightly.


Chris

Edited by - Hyperfishing on Aug 02 2007 23:10:14

Homeport: Sand Bar, Great South Bay Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 02 2007 :  22:57:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Why would I anchor in an inlet? By the way, I have 2 anchors.

-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

inspector3500

RO# 829

Posted - Aug 02 2007 :  23:09:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob? Bob's not here.

Ray,

"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." -- Thomas Jefferson

"It is error alone which needs the support of government. Truth can stand by itself."-- Thomas Jefferson Notes on Virginia

Perhaps like the many and various meanings of the word "we," liberals use the word "unsubstantiated" to mean "tested repeatedly and proved true." Ann Coulter

Homeport: Albany, Oregon Go to Top of Page

Charlie

RO# 6922

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  00:00:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob, your anchor can keep you from running aground if your motor quits among other things.


Homeport: Go to Top of Page

psalzer

RO# 4570



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  06:25:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Why would I anchor in an inlet? By the way, I have 2 anchors."

Bob, what would you do if youe engine quit while entering an inlet??? Perhaps an anchor would keep you off the rocks and the bow pointed into the seas (of course in a bowrider it may not make much difference) until someone comes to get you! It is questions like that, that make some of us wonder.


Pete

Homeport: Fayetteville, Ga Go to Top of Page

L Hall

RO# 1



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  07:08:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Walter, I asked the question because our bud Bob said that he never heard of a current table. Mike and Pascal touched on the subject but everyone running inlets needs to understand that tides and currents are not synonymous. Professional mariners are less concerned about high and low tide than they are about slack current. Let's look at Lake Worth Inlet, for example - it's a nice, wide inlet with plenty of depth. Low tide today is at 6:07 in the port. However, slack current does not occur for almost two hours - at 7:58. In fact, at 6 AM, the current is ebbing at 3.5 knots. If there is a decent onshore breeze, you'll find steep, potentially breaking waves in the inlet at dead low tide. Sea Tow and BoatUS love inlets because they get to salvage overturned boats in them on a regular basis.

Running inlets safely, as most here know, requires greater skill and knowledge than lake or bay boating does. Most "accidents" occur when someone heads out an inlet, gets in the middle of the mess and then decides to turn around. That move, in itself, requires skill because you need to complete the turn in between waves, basically a powered turn that must be completed before the next wave catches your beam. With an ebbing current, you are better off transversing the inlet, getting into calmer seas and then making your turn. First choice, of course, is not entering it at all if conditions are not good. While judging wave height in an inlet can be difficult, if you see two foot swells rolling in before you even get to the inlet, you can assume conditions are much worse in the inlet itself.

But the important lesson here is that ducks and geese are not the same, bears and moose are not the same, coke and pepsi are not the same and tides and currents are not the same.




Les Hall, ATC Forum Host

Homeport: Concord, NH Go to Top of Page

JoeBTB

RO# 517

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  07:19:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Les, great point and great description. It deserves a new topic of its own!


Homeport: Go to Top of Page

Harlan

RO# 15327



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  07:54:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Maybe Bob will start one.

Take a lesson from your dog. No matter what life brings you kick some grass over that sh*t and move on.

Homeport: Shreveport,LA Go to Top of Page

gcirillo

RO# 17964

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  09:24:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think you need to focus on the words. The question was whether it was "reckless." To me that implies an unreasonable danger to life (yours and others). The fact that he was risking his own boat is not decisive in my opinion; and I think the precautions he took probably kept life and limb relatively under control.

Was it....
... safe? (No.)
... prudent? (No.)
... risky? (Yes.)
... bold? (Yes.)
... a calculated risk? (Yes.)
... reckless? (No.)



Homeport: Mayo, MD Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  09:33:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Anchor as a safety item, OK, now I understand. You see, I'm not the kind of guy that plays out every scenerio in my mind before it happens (who can?), but I can react quickly and with a lot of common sense. For example, before running the inlet, I gave no thought to making sure I didn't "broach", but when I got in the inlet and saw that broaching (a new term I just learned here) could possibly happen, I adjusted and worked the throttle and wheel so that I wouldn't let that happen. Same thing with the anchor - I never thought to myself, "gee, if my engine quits, I'll just set the anchor and keep myself off the rocks", but I'm pretty sure that if that happened, I would see myself heading for trouble and react properly with the anchors.

-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

Ghost

RO# 689



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  09:58:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What was your plan for learning the not so intuative reasons on why you are broaching and the fact that as you turn your steering wheel it does not seem to have any effect on where your boat is going?

Then go back and take your own poll again and be honest.

How do you "plan" to be safe in knowing the 101 list of things you need to know about running an inlet and not even discover the term broaching?

bp
..maintaining that a 20 foot bowrider could be safe given the conditions, but that the information needed to do so was insufficient.


What part of GALE WARNING did you not understand?

Homeport: Everett Wa Go to Top of Page

psalzer

RO# 4570



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  10:27:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob, Someone with "many years experience" and "hundreds of hours at the helm" (these are your words), should at least be thinking of things that could go wrong while traversing an inlet, such as loss of power or steering. It is not prudent to wait until one of these things happen and then try and figure out what to do. Another quetion for you, have you ever thought about what you would do in the event of a man overboard?? What would you wife, or crew do in the event you went overboard?? On my boat we occasionally practice a "man overboard drill", where we throw a PFD in the water and practice what we would do if someone fell overboard. Just for kicks sometime, throw a PFD in the water and step away from the helm (at idle speed and insuring there is no other traffic) and tell youf wife or crew "I jsut fell overboard". The reaction may tell you some things you need to concentrate on. Boating is great fun, but also has an element of danger involved.

Pete

Homeport: Fayetteville, Ga Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  10:31:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Is it important to know the term "broaching", or is it important to realize that it's not a good thing to have the boat sort of slow down when coming down a wave and turn sideways to the wave? As soon as I felt that start to happen, I realized the best thing to do was to not let the boat "stall" going down the wave, but rather put more power into it so that I kept the boat moving in a forward direction. Voila, no more of that possible "broching" thingy.

That's the difference with me, I am very intuative, but don't often know the "official" term for things (hence frequent my use of the word "thingy"). :)


-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  10:37:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pete, good idea! We've nver done that kind of thing, but I often "think out-loud" as I'm doing things, for the benefit of the crew and guests. For example, I'll say things like, "Gotta turn that blower on", or "You know where those PFD are stowed, right?", or "Listen to that guy on channel 16, requestiing assistance.", or "look at the gps, here's where it shows our longitude/latitude.".

I guess I just don't make a list of things that could go wrong with the appropriate reaction, but in the back of my mind, I think I have a pretty good idea what to do given the situation.


-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

STEELA

RO# 17957

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  12:10:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You take that sucker thru Plum Island Sound, East Wind and out going tide you'de be pushing up daisys!

Sounds like you did all the things right except the life jackets.



Homeport: newburyport, ma Go to Top of Page

psalzer

RO# 4570



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  12:19:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yep .. Plum Gut can be a real thriller!!!!

Pete

Homeport: Fayetteville, Ga Go to Top of Page

rommer

RO# 12280



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  12:43:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by blouderback

Is it important to know the term "broaching", or is it important to realize that it's not a good thing to have the boat sort of slow down when coming down a wave and turn sideways to the wave? As soon as I felt that start to happen, I realized the best thing to do was to not let the boat "stall" going down the wave, but rather put more power into it so that I kept the boat moving in a forward direction. Voila, no more of that possible "broching" thingy.

That's the difference with me, I am very intuative, but don't often know the "official" term for things (hence frequent my use of the word "thingy"). :)



Of course too much power and then you wind up pitch poling as you bury the bow.

But I'm sure you knew that.




Boats, yup, 5 of em...
WLC - We love Champlin's!

Homeport: Liberty Landing Marina, NJ Go to Top of Page

rommer

RO# 12280



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  12:50:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by blouderback

Is it important to know the term "broaching", or is it important to realize that it's not a good thing to have the boat sort of slow down when coming down a wave and turn sideways to the wave?



Actually it is important to know that term. Not knowing it means you haven't really taken the time to study boat handling by reading such things a Chapmans ($65) or taking a course ($small fee).

You seem to prefer to come here, ask questions ($free), then argue with people that try to educate you ($priceless), because you are taught to doubt the wisdom of those with more experience then you.

A lot of people have short memories and look at each of your threads as a stand alone entry. Some can see the total picture you present which really paints you in a foolish light. You and others may not agree with that but thats the way I see it.




Boats, yup, 5 of em...
WLC - We love Champlin's!

Homeport: Liberty Landing Marina, NJ Go to Top of Page

Msibley

RO# 16534

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  12:52:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rommer

quote:
Originally posted by blouderback

Is it important to know the term "broaching", or is it important to realize that it's not a good thing to have the boat sort of slow down when coming down a wave and turn sideways to the wave? As soon as I felt that start to happen, I realized the best thing to do was to not let the boat "stall" going down the wave, but rather put more power into it so that I kept the boat moving in a forward direction. Voila, no more of that possible "broching" thingy.

That's the difference with me, I am very intuative, but don't often know the "official" term for things (hence frequent my use of the word "thingy"). :)



Of course too much power and then you wind up pitch poling as you bury the bow.

But I'm sure you knew that.





Yes...I was just going to say "go ahead - damn the torpedoes and full speed ahead - give me warp speed Mr. Scott"...and the forward half of your boat will be underwater in a New York second.

You have to learn to play the throttle and stay on the back of the wave. Too fast, you go over onto the face...too slow, the wave behind you gets you. It's all feel and experience.

You knew that coming over the top of the wave was not good though and that's a start.



Mike
"War is cruelty. There's no use trying to reform it, the crueler it is the sooner it will be over."
"I hate newspapermen. They come into camp and pick up their camp rumors and print them as facts. I regard them as spies, which, in truth, they are."
- Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, Commanding, Union Armies-Military Division of the Mississippi

Homeport: Melbourne, FL Go to Top of Page

Harlan

RO# 15327



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  12:55:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There is more BS in this thread than there is in the Fort Worth Stockyards.

Take a lesson from your dog. No matter what life brings you kick some grass over that sh*t and move on.

Homeport: Shreveport,LA Go to Top of Page

Tanqueray

RO# 17091

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  13:21:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I"m wondering if Bob had included in the Original Posting about Venturing out into the ocean that he also had his wife and apparently another couple with him if some of the responses would have been different?
Where on the boat were those other three people sitting Bob?


KALENA II

Homeport: New York Go to Top of Page

L Hall

RO# 1



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  14:54:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob, you are scaring me. Stall going down a wave? Is that something that bowriders do? Power down a wave? Try that and you'll stuff that bow of yours so far down you'll need a periscope to check traffic. You need to remember that the wave doesn't move - regardless of how it seems. The water goes up and down. Your prop has the same effect as it would in flat water.



Les Hall, ATC Forum Host

Homeport: Concord, NH Go to Top of Page

In the know

RO# 20824

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  15:04:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rommer

quote:
Originally posted by blouderback

Is it important to know the term "broaching", or is it important to realize that it's not a good thing to have the boat sort of slow down when coming down a wave and turn sideways to the wave? As soon as I felt that start to happen, I realized the best thing to do was to not let the boat "stall" going down the wave, but rather put more power into it so that I kept the boat moving in a forward direction. Voila, no more of that possible "broching" thingy.

That's the difference with me, I am very intuative, but don't often know the "official" term for things (hence frequent my use of the word "thingy"). :)



Of course too much power and then you wind up pitch poling as you bury the bow.

But I'm sure you knew that.





Rommer:

WTF - you just spoiled next weeks thread from Bob.


--------------------------------------------------------

The enemy of society - the HUTAL

Homeport: The Ocean State Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  15:06:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tanq, I've said twice so far on this thread that the only ones on board were me and my 45 year old friend.

Les, when I say stall, I mean stall in that the boat is not really moving forward in relation to the water. I found that this was a bad thing, and gave it some more throttle while going down the wave (and then backed off the throttle a bit just before hitting the front of the next wave). This seemed to do the trick well on the way out, but as I've said before, that techniique didn't work the same on the way back in with a following sea. Keep in mind, the bow never got stuffed, not even close, but I just FELT like it was too low. I never came near broaching either, I just felt the boat "stall" (as I describe it, probably not the right term), and compensated appropriately.

Waves dont move? Only go up and down? Are you sure about that? Might want to ask the people who saw the December 26th, 2004 Tsunami.


-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

Tanqueray

RO# 17091

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  15:26:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I guess I must reluctantly apologize Bob. I read the Poll Criteria quickly and at first I thought that when you said that both your wives knew when you were to return that they were with you. I see now that you apparently only had one other person with you.
By the way....What was HIS take on the situation?


KALENA II

Homeport: New York Go to Top of Page

Harlan

RO# 15327



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  15:26:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob, ole boy, I think Les is going to educate you on waves.
More beer and pass the popcorn.


Take a lesson from your dog. No matter what life brings you kick some grass over that sh*t and move on.

Homeport: Shreveport,LA Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  15:31:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tanq, he was encouraging me the whole way, never had any fear. It really wasn't as bad as you all think, there was never any danger of swamping, broaching, plowing the bow, waves over the bow, or anything. Jeepers, I didn't even get a splash in my face! I just FELT less under control with the bow so far down on the way in. Maybe it was normal, but just felt so different because I was able to keep the bow UP so high on the way out. When I pulled the boat onto the trailer the next day and removed the drain plug thingy, no water at all came out, in fact, the bilge was bone dry after a week in the bay and a trip out and in the inlet. THAT's how calm it was.

-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

L Hall

RO# 1



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  15:44:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Harlan, I'll let him do the reading

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocean_surface_wave

"There is little actual forward motion of individual water particles in a wave, despite the large amount of energy and momentum it may carry forward."


Les Hall, ATC Forum Host

Homeport: Concord, NH Go to Top of Page

psalzer

RO# 4570



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  15:50:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, there ya go Les ... trying to confuse Bob with facts!!

Pete

Homeport: Fayetteville, Ga Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  15:50:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Les. Sentence #2 of that article says they may travel thousands of miles, so I guess both of us are correct.

-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

Harlan

RO# 15327



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:02:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Still didn't soak in, did it.

Take a lesson from your dog. No matter what life brings you kick some grass over that sh*t and move on.

Homeport: Shreveport,LA Go to Top of Page

Msibley

RO# 16534

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:08:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Unbelievable. One person tells you have a tail..you might dismiss it. Two people tell you have a tail...best look!

But you're right Bob...Les (and others here) don't know squat about the behavior of the ocean. Just challenge everything.



Mike
"War is cruelty. There's no use trying to reform it, the crueler it is the sooner it will be over."
"I hate newspapermen. They come into camp and pick up their camp rumors and print them as facts. I regard them as spies, which, in truth, they are."
- Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, Commanding, Union Armies-Military Division of the Mississippi

Homeport: Melbourne, FL Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:13:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Come on, do you all believe that waves just go up and down? Look at the picture from the wikipedia link and tell me that those water particles are NOT moving forward. Common sense here, fellas. I like how you all ignored the part that says the travel thousands of miles and concentrate on the other (contradictory) statement. I suggest that we are both right.



-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

Wingspar

RO# 1979

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:16:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Waves dont move? Only go up and down? Are you sure about that? Might want to ask the people who saw the December 26th, 2004 Tsunami."

As I remember the water in a wave moves in a circular pattern. The closer the the surface the larger the circular motion is. But after the "wave" has passed, the water is still in the same position. So Les is correct in saying the the water is basicly moving up and down.

Science experiment.... Fill the tub 3/4 full of water. Place a cork in the middle of the tub. Use a large flat object to create a wave. Note cork moves up and down but generally stays in the same position. Get your favorite boating mag and enjoy hot bath.

a tsunami or any "wave" as it approches shallower water, the lower part of the wave can no longer move up and down. Only up which then starts to build upon itself in wave height. Kind of like taking a stationary glass of water and tipping it over.

A Bowrider boat is designed for flat water. Not going threw three foot waves. I remember a case from amny years ago here in Seattle a guy was out in his bowrider and caught some heavy water on the winward side of the 520 bridge. Stuffed the bow filling the boat with water. Don't remember the finally outcome.


*** "there was never any danger of swamping, broaching, plowing the bow, waves over the bow, or anything." ***
At least to me this indicates a lack of experince or "sea" time.

Dave

Faster now but still steady



Homeport: Semiahmoo, WA Go to Top of Page

Msibley

RO# 16534

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:19:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob, WHO TF cares? A wave packs a sh!t-pot-full of energy...whether it goes up/down/sideways or up your butt...it would be wise to learn the dynamics and how it affects your boat!

Jeezus...is it time to drink yet?



Mike
"War is cruelty. There's no use trying to reform it, the crueler it is the sooner it will be over."
"I hate newspapermen. They come into camp and pick up their camp rumors and print them as facts. I regard them as spies, which, in truth, they are."
- Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, Commanding, Union Armies-Military Division of the Mississippi

Homeport: Melbourne, FL Go to Top of Page

L Hall

RO# 1



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:19:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Think of it in terms you might be able to understand, Bob - the "wave" at the ballpark. The people do not run around the ball park. They go up and down. Yet the "wave" appears to travel all the way around.



Les Hall, ATC Forum Host

Homeport: Concord, NH Go to Top of Page

psalzer

RO# 4570



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:20:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob ... try this ... get a piece of rope maybe 15' long, lay it on the ground ... hold one end in you hand ... raise your hand about shoulder high and quickly move your hand in a downward direction ... note the "waves" in your rope ... did the rope move??? Now maybe you can visualize what wave action does.

Pete

Homeport: Fayetteville, Ga Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:20:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, good point with the cork in the tub experiment, I totally see what you're getting at. Let me also propose an experiment: Put a boogie board out in the ocean just in front of a wave, and watch it get pushed into the beach. Or, just stand in the water chest deep and notice how the rollers are pushing you in, or even out (in the case of a rip tide). Not even talking about breakers here.

-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

In the know

RO# 20824

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:23:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In your example Bob - the boogie board is moving, not the waves.

--------------------------------------------------------

The enemy of society - the HUTAL

Homeport: The Ocean State Go to Top of Page

Harlan

RO# 15327



Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:23:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Unfortunately, Bob, you are the kind of guy statistics are made from.

Take a lesson from your dog. No matter what life brings you kick some grass over that sh*t and move on.

Homeport: Shreveport,LA Go to Top of Page

oldfishboat

RO# 24623

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:25:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Inlet !!!!!!!

The waves are moving with the current !!!!!!!

Thats what makes em so interesting. Inlets that is.


Oldfishboat guy

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

blouderback

RO# 24057

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:26:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, I understand that the "wave" may not move forward, but you can't tell me that the water particles are NOT moving forward, and that this wave DOES NOT push the boat forward.

Maybe my mis-use of terminology is getting us all confused. I apologize for that.


-Bob-
.................................................................
"Annabo": 2005 Larson Senza 206 w/5.0L Bravo III

Homeport: Chalfont, Pennsylvania Go to Top of Page

In the know

RO# 20824

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:28:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As my dad says - some people are meant to be Captains', and others are meant to charter.

--------------------------------------------------------

The enemy of society - the HUTAL

Homeport: The Ocean State Go to Top of Page

LouC

RO# 10314

Posted - Aug 03 2007 :  16:28:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have a old I/O bowrider and have gone in and out of Northport Bay LI into Huntington Bay and LI Sound. The inlet from Huntington Bay into Northport Bay can be particularly challenging at certain times. During those times, I sometimes wished I was in a self bailing boat, preferably completely foam filled! When I rebuilt the floor in this boat, some people advised me not to replace the foam, because of rot concerns, but as far as I am concerned I will take the incremental increase in safety that the foam provides. In fact I would have added more if it would not have involved restructuring much of the rest of the interior.
Basic floatation is not the same as what Whalers and McKee Crafts have, I have seen boats with basic flotation sink and basically there is the first few feet of the bow to hang onto. Better than nothing, but full floation in a small boat is much safer.

I have seen boats smaller, and less seaworthy navigate the inlets in my area, but only you can decide what risk is acceptable, based on the conditions, your skill level and your boat.


1988 Four Winns 200 Horizon 4.3 OMC Cobra
1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4.0 Selectrac
2007 Jeep Grand Cherokee 5.7 Hemi Quadradrive II

Edited by - LouC on Aug 03 2007 16:33:48

Homeport: Long Island NY Go to Top of Page
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