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drfeno

RO# 30284

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  09:27:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,

I'm considering changing marinas from one with floating concrete docks to one with fixed docks with pilings. My question is, when backing into a slip with pilings what is the proper way to tie up? what I'm looking for is which line to tie first, when to tie it (while backing in), what type of knot to use, and should the line be left on the piling, or tied to it on the way in? the slip configuration is 2 pilings at the front end of the slip, 2 halfway back, and 2 more at the stern. There will be a finger pier on one side. Assume I can't reach the top of the pilings. My boat has a bow, midship and stern cleats. Any info would be great.

Thanks

Homeport: Noank, CT

In the know

RO# 20824

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  09:35:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
6 lines. 2 bow, 2 spring, and 2 stern, preferrably crossed stern lines if possible. I would leave the lines tied to the piling. Which line to secure first depends on the docking situation, but I always go for a spring line first.

--------------------------------------------------------

The enemy of society - the HUTAL

Homeport: The Ocean State Go to Top of Page

Brian N

RO# 3970



Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  09:37:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I had a similar setup in my last slip. I used crossed stern lines to the cleats on the dock, crossed bow lines to the front pilings, and spring lines from the center pilings to both the bow and stern. Overkill? Probably, but she stayed put even in the huurricanes we got the last two years I was there. I left the spring and bow lines on the pilings and kept the stern lines aboard.




Homeport: Somewhere in the woods, NH Go to Top of Page

vic33004

RO# 27361

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  09:37:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
if it is your permanent slip you'll want to leave your dock lines on the pilings. use some wood hooks at the top of them to hang the lines from so when you come back they are easy to retrieve. i leave my dock lines so the adjustments are made on the dock and the splice on the cleat of the boat except where i can't reach the piling, then i leave the adjustment on the deck cleat.

Vic33004

02 Regal 4260

Homeport: Fort Lauderdale, FL Go to Top of Page

Robyns Nest

RO# 4846

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  09:38:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What ITK said.

You can also put long nails or hooks in the pilings that you can use to prevent the line from dropping down on the piling and they also hold the lines when you're gone from the slip. Remember to not let the nails or hooks stick out where they can damage you boat when backing in or leaving.


__________________________________________________
2003 56 Post Convertible 2x1300HP V12 MAN
1997 20' Boston Whaler Dauntless Mercury 225 EFI
--------------------------------------------------------
"The future ain't what is used to be."
- Yogi Berra

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

giolic

RO# 23638

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  09:49:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Why are you leaving Spicers ?


Homeport: Go to Top of Page

drfeno

RO# 30284

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  10:01:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks all,

I'm not at Spicers, I'm at Noank Shipyard, and I'm only considering it. Noank shipyard is pretty exposed to the sound, large rollers come through the marina quite often, its also quite windy there quite often. The Marina I'm considering is in a much quieter cove, and over $1000.00 cheaper per year. It also has some amenities NSY doesn't offer, like a pool, and free wireless internet. Also, next boating season we'll have a 6 month old baby, so I expect most of my boating next year to be in and around the marina and not out to sea.



Homeport: Noank, CT Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  10:05:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
piling or floating, the spring lines normally always goes on first (and untied last) since that's what stopping the boat from backing into the dock. Exception would be if the current or wind is pushing the boat out of the slip, in that case you'd put/untie the crossed stern lines first (or aft spring if you use them)

you'd want to leave your lines on the pilings, usually pilings have large wood hooks to hold the lines... if not use large utility hooks like what you'd use to hang a bike in the garage.

I ALWAYS use the eye on the boat for spring lines since i know that's how far the boat will back in... for bow and stern i use the bitter end, marked with nylon ties. Reason i dont' like using the eye on the boat cleat is that on a windy day it cna be impossible to pull the boat close enough to pass the eye without working the line on the cleat. you cna also get a finger caught between the eye and the cleat. less of a concern on a small boat that you can pull easily, but a concern on larger boats.

when backing in, the spring lines are loose so it's easy to slip the eye on the cleat.



Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

Badsanta

RO# 28970

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  10:22:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Are you trying to set me up? This is in every basic sailing/boating book out there. Get a chapmans as you need to do some reading as there are many knots and rope size to boat size. You tie almost the same way as a floating dock but you need enough line to account for tides. OK I'll bite and hope this helps. Take a calm day for your first time. I use two sets of dock lines one I keep on the boat for when I go to other places the other I keep on the piling at the home dock. You dont have to go over the top of the post but can go around it. You will need 2 bow, 2 stern and 2 longer ones for spring lines. Buy the ones with the pre-made loops on the end. Oh and get some help. Have your helpers boat hook and fend off the posts while you stand at the bow then the stern and pull the boat to the furthest post you can reach. Put the looped end around the post and put the running end through the loop, pull the running end till it gets tight around the post, then push the loop up as high as you can, do this to all 4 corners. put your spring line fron the furthest bow post to the furthest stern post. I put one on both sides. Now you can adjust all the lines from the boat. If you like after you are happy with your spot you can mark your lines so you can quickly find the same place. When you leave the dock you remove the slack lines first the last line that is tight one depending on current and wind. When comming back in I attach the first one that either keeps me from blowing into the dock or the one that keeps me from being pushed out of my slip. Bow lines get tied to the bow cleats the stern lines get crossed and I tie my port stern line to my starboard stern cleat. I tie my spring lines to the center cleat, the one half way back. But the book will show better discriptions and drawings.

Badsanta

Homeport: VA Go to Top of Page

drfeno

RO# 30284

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  10:37:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nope, no setup.

I'm just looking for some advice from acutal experience. While I do like to read books on boating and have found a lot of valuable info in them, many of them are quite general and don't give real world do's and don'ts. This was my first year with a boat, and I've done pretty well. I've done a little cruising, anchoring, and have been in one other marina (Mitchell's in Greenport NY). If I do end up switching marinas, it will be my first time pulling into and out of a slip that uses pilings.



Homeport: Noank, CT Go to Top of Page

walterv

RO# 12640



Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  10:51:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"what I'm looking for is which line to tie first,"

This will be determined by the wind and current at your slip.
At my home port, the predominant wind is from the south, which blows my boat out of the slip. So in my case, we tie the stern lines first. On the port side I have a finger pier, to starboard I have another boat, so the first stern line that gets tied to the boat is the starboard one, this prevents my boat from hitting my neighbor’s boat.

PS
Your stern lines should be crisscrossed.

So in short, pull you boat into the slip, see what nature wants to do with it, then attach the first line that makes sense.

Walter


And always remember, life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by those moments that take our breath away.

George Carlin

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

Prospective

RO# 23085

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  11:36:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I had this same question about 2 months ago. Pascal was nice enough to give me a complete description of the lines and sequence.

And as for Chapmans.... I love that book but I did not find any reference to to that type of docking. If it's in there, please give me a page reference....


1990 Tiara 3600 Open
Twin 3208 CAT Diesels

Homeport: Barrington, RI Go to Top of Page

el sea

RO# 27061

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  15:24:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My rule is if you secure the mid-ship cleat you control the vessel (in most cases). That being said we try to untie the spring line last and tie the spring lines first. Again, when you secure the mid-shhip cleat, you control the vessel.

El Sea,
1976' Thompson 44
Suite 44
St Petersburg, Fl



Homeport: St Petersburg, Florida Go to Top of Page

Robbins29

RO# 22313

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  15:32:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have a single-screw inboard. It's a 29-foot workboat, so it's fairly light. I generally tie the stern lines first, and have two fenders to drop on to the stern cleats to keep me off the pier while I go up forward to retrieve the bow and spring lines. All lines have the eyes on the cleats. I find that, more often than not, any extra "help" given by somebody yanking on the spring line throws the stern off before the stern lines get retrieved.

You might want to consider running a taut line from the piling to the pier cleat on the side opposite the finger. It's nice to have something to grab onto and steady things out, especially if you are backing in alone.

Don't get me wrong. I'm glad to spring into the berth if there is a high cross wind.


Robbins29

Homeport: Solomons, MD Go to Top of Page

gcolton

RO# 9708

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  17:14:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I use two bow lines (not crossed), two mid lines and 2 crossed stern lines. I add one spring line to keep the swim platform off the dock. All lines are adjusted on the pilings. All I have to do when casting off or returning in remove the spliced in eye. Which line you cast off or secure first just depends upon convenience. I leave sufficient slack in all lines that tidal changes of several feet can be accommodated.

G


If you are not boating or golfing you are wasting your day.

Homeport: EAFB Yacht Club Go to Top of Page

CurrentSea

RO# 10265



Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  17:26:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have 6 lines as well.
My boat can't touch a pole, pier or dock with these lines no matter what tide.
When I come to boat I undo starboard rear line to make it easy for people to get on and off from finger pier.
Examples attached:

Rears Crossed


Spring Starboard


Bow


Spring Port


2009 Regal 4080
Volvo Diesel IPS

Homeport: Anchorage YC - Lindenhurst, NY Go to Top of Page

rduhon

RO# 29321

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  19:20:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We use 5 lines. We are in a covered slip with 5 total pilings. We are the first straight North facing boat after several that are angled towards the West. The slip to our port is also about 15 ft. longer which is why we have 5 pilings. One extra on the port side for the longer slip.
We have one line tied to each center piling on each side and the eyes goes back to the center cleats. These keep the boat from going too far back into the dock.
We also have one line from the center starboard piling, with an eye, that goes up to the bow cleat. It keeps the boat from going too far forward.
We have 2 galvanized pully's with weighted lines for the two stern cleats, without eyes so we can adjust when we tie up. These keep the boat pulled towards the dock(we back in).
They also alow the boat to rise and fall with the tides.
We can only get on the boat from the stern and, if the water isn't too high or low, from the port side also, but it is a big hop. So, we have the weighted lines to keep her close to the dock. It has worked well so far.



Homeport: Lake Charles, La Go to Top of Page

Badsanta

RO# 28970

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  19:56:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ok, my bad. I did not look in chapmans, I assumed, and you know what happens when you assume. It was the biggest book I could think of. I did not mean that as an insult. I have been bated with an intresting question, to find it was a joke that went over my head.

Badsanta

Homeport: VA Go to Top of Page

GaryP

RO# 15124

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  20:11:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think your's is a very valid question. The books are not too clear but you got some great responses here and the one with pics is great. When I first bot by boat in Tampa, with only lake experience, I had the same problem with 3 ft tides it can be tricky. I found the best answer is to look at the other boats tied at the same marina and see what they use, and ask around, people were very helpful to a novice (or not). I remember one of the first times I was trying to back in with a strong cross wind and a local came to help and said to toss him a line. I did and then he drylly (?) told me it helps to have the line tied to the boat first ! I'll never live that one down, never made that mistake again but see lots of people come in unprepared. Have lines tied the boat, fenders out, and be ready.

The crossed stern lines, fixed bow ines, and loose spring lines worked for me. I set the springs closest to the dock or finger pier, used the lines opposite the springs to control the drift towards the dock, and it worked really well. Set the springs so the boat doesn't hit the opposite pilings and the one's opposite so it doesn't hit the pilings. As for what to tie first when coming in, it depends on the wind but I'd generally set a mid-ship or bow line first, the side depends on the wind, because I could control the stern with the motors. I was an engineeeeeer in my first career so it took me awhile to figure it out but I got it more or less perfect in the end. :))


1999 Chaparral 2835 ssi

Edited by - GaryP on Sep 09 2008 20:19:32

Homeport: CO Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  20:39:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
it really pays to try to visualize what happens as the tide changes and wind gusts hit the boat. When you first get in the slip, try to stay on the boat till the nest high or low tide to see how it affects your lines, or if you dont' live too far, come back for the next low and high tides.

always remember that longer lines will handle tides better. just visualize the arc the end of the line will follow as the tide changes. It's hard to come up with a hard ratio, 4:1 works pretty well. in other words, if your line is 5 times longer than the tide, the boat will not move much with the tide... so, with 3' tide, 12' lines will keep your boat more or less in place.

Also, try positioning the lines at an average height on the pilings... you dont' always have to tie them at the top. By positioning them at a median height, it reduces the impact of tides


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Edited by - PascalG on Sep 09 2008 21:57:39

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

Mackeral Hunter

RO# 937

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  21:49:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It would be worth a visit to the new marina to see how other boats are secured. Just by observing you can tell a lot about the necessary arrangement of lines etc.

I normally use the six line method mentioned above. Spring lines secured to the midships cleats on both sides and to the stern cleats on both the port and starboard. Stern lines crossed and bow lines secured to the bit on the bow and to the adjacent pilings.

Look to see what others are doing with similar size boats etc.


"Whenever...it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people's hats off - then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I can." Herman Melville, Moby Dick

Homeport: Germanton and Harkers Island, NC Go to Top of Page

thataway4

RO# 10872

Posted - Sep 09 2008 :  22:10:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You have excellent advice--one thing I didn't see was the spring double spring lines--one from the boat foreward and one from the boat aft. Often these are from amidships cleats. But sometimes the spring from the aft of the boat to the dock may come from stern cleats.

Although the usual "knot" (A hitch is used to tie a line to a piling) for pilings, is a clove hitch, followed with two half hitches, there is another hitch we use, called the tug boat hitch. The advantage of this hitch is that it can be easily untied under load, or tied putting the line under load. Basically two turns around the piling, then a turn around the line leading to the boat, back around the back side of the piling, a turn about the line going to the boat (opposite the first turn), then repeat this twice, and finish with two half hitches on the line going to the boat.


Bob Austin

Homeport: FL Go to Top of Page

Denis

RO# 20678

Posted - Sep 11 2008 :  10:10:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It sounds like you are going to the marina I am at. I usually have a mate on the bow while backing in so she ties up the front two lines which are on a hook at each outward piling. I stay at the helm until I am far enough back to grab my spring line on the finger pier side. I can make small adjustments while backing to keep the boat in between pilings, then while drifting back I can easily reach the spring line and loop it around the midship cleat. That keeps me from drifting too far back and by then the mate has one or both bow lines tied. At this point I can grab the two rear lines and finish the job. If you are at my marina, I think you will love the close proximity to Mystic and how relaxed everything is.


Homeport: Noank Go to Top of Page

drfeno

RO# 30284

Posted - Sep 11 2008 :  10:20:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the outpouring of info. If I do indeed change marinas I'll be well prepared to tie up properly. I intend to go check out this marina in person this weekend and I'll look at how others are tied up. I do understand about spring lines and bow and stern lines and their funtions. I currently always use a spring line from my midship cleat to an aft cleat on the dock as my first line, and to help bring me in. Its ususally just me and my wife, so she steps off when we are close, and makes this line fast which allows me to bring the boat in. I'm on the end of a pier, so I have no boat or piling or pier on the starbord side (if I back in). My main question really was if its normal to leave your lines tied to the pilings and pick them up on the way in, or do you tie them fresh every time. I seem to have that answer now. Since no one ties to pilings at my marina I wasn't sure if it was a faux pas to leave your lines on the pilings since they are shared with other boats.


Homeport: Noank, CT Go to Top of Page

Jimmiere

RO# 12931

Posted - Sep 11 2008 :  10:23:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The only addition I would make would be snubbers on the shortest lines if you are in an area where the wind can drive an extra low tide from time to time. It will possibly save you a cleat/fiberglass repair. Don't ask how I know this.


Homeport: Rose Haven, MD Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 11 2008 :  10:30:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
no question about leaving lines on the pilings when you leave the slip, unless you want to make it twice as hard when you come back in... I share two pilings with the next boat, like everybody else we hang our lines on the hook when we leave.



Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

drfeno

RO# 30284

Posted - Sep 11 2008 :  10:38:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Denis,

The marina I'm looking at is the east yard of Mystic Shipyard. The west yard has a waiting list. If you are at the east yard, is it an easy in and out of there? From the pictures I'v seen, if looks like there is a channel marked with private markers to get in and out of there. My boat has a 3' draft. I'm going down to check out both yards this Sunday.



Homeport: Noank, CT Go to Top of Page

Dave K S

RO# 12840

Posted - Sep 11 2008 :  12:35:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
drfeno,
I have been following your post and it I thought it sounded like Mystic Shipyard East. I have been there for 17 years. I started with a 25 foot boat and moved to a 34 in 1995. I don't know what your boat draws but other than extremly low tides I have no problem getting in or out. My boat draws 42 inches. The channel is well marked and not problem as long as you don't leave it. You will have to allow for about a 3.5 foot tide when tying to the pileings. I have helped many new people adjusting their lines. I should be their this weekend. If you have any questions I'm in slip 4011. The boat name is Cruise Control stop by I will be glad to help.
Dave


1989 Luhrs 342 315 HP
6LYA-UTE Yanmar diesels

Edited by - Dave K S on Sep 11 2008 12:44:33

Homeport: Mystic,Ct Go to Top of Page

drfeno

RO# 30284

Posted - Sep 11 2008 :  13:00:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Dave,

My boat is a 31' Silverton Convertible with a 12' beam and 35" draft. I'm going to try and stop by the marina sometime on Sunday. Is there an office at the east yard, and is it open on Sundays? Also, from the arial photos, it looks like there is a dock box at each slip. Are these provided by the marina, or does everyone just have the same box? Thanks for the invitation, and if I do stop at the marina (very likely) I will stop and say hello.



Homeport: Noank, CT Go to Top of Page

Dave K S

RO# 12840

Posted - Sep 11 2008 :  13:11:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There is an office but it is not open on sundays. All slips have dock boxes supplied by the yard.

1989 Luhrs 342 315 HP
6LYA-UTE Yanmar diesels

Homeport: Mystic,Ct Go to Top of Page

Denis

RO# 20678

Posted - Sep 12 2008 :  14:14:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Drfeno,
Like Dave I am at the east yard and am a couple of boats away from Dave. This is my second year there and the channel is well marked and is no problem getting into and out of. My boat drafts 42" and I have never touched bottom. I do a lot of night trips and find it easy enough even in the dark. Dock boxes are supplied, WiFi is there but sometimes hard to get without an antenna and cable is available if you want. All in all a very nice marina, secure, quiet, nice picnic areas with tables and gas grills and pretty close to everything. Good luck maybe we'll see you there. Denis



Homeport: Noank Go to Top of Page

drfeno

RO# 30284

Posted - Sep 12 2008 :  21:16:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for all the good information. I'm going to stop by both the west and east yards on Sunday. I'd think the office in the west yard would be open.


Homeport: Noank, CT Go to Top of Page

drfeno

RO# 30284

Posted - Sep 15 2008 :  09:07:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Thanks again for showing me around the marina on Sunday. I plan to give them a call today and find out the particulars of which slips are available, pricing, and winter storage. I may be seeing you next season.

Dave



Homeport: Noank, CT Go to Top of Page

drfeno

RO# 30284

Posted - Sep 17 2008 :  16:24:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Dave,

I spoke to the office, and they don't have any 36' slips available. They have a 32, but say my boat is too long for it. Thanks again for showing me around, I may try to get on a waiting list or something.



Homeport: Noank, CT Go to Top of Page

rawidman

RO# 25110

Posted - Feb 07 2014 :  09:14:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes I know it's a very old post. It came up in a Google search.

All good information if this is your home slip and you can leave your lines on the pilings, but I'm planning a trip up the AICW and the Chesapeake and unlike around here where all the docks are floating with full length finger piers, it appears many marinas where I'm planning to go have short or no finger piers and pilings for tying the bow or spring lines.

So my question is, as a transient, how do I get my lines on the pilings when entering and off when leaving? Which end should be on the piling and how should it be secured?


Ron
2000 Camano Troll

Edited by - rawidman on Feb 07 2014 09:15:03

Homeport: Charleston, SC Go to Top of Page

jmeirhofer

RO# 30972



Posted - Feb 07 2014 :  09:57:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For me I use the Lasso method. Or more accurately my wife does. Usually not that hard with the spring line since they always seem to put us in the narrowist slip available (j/k). This is one of the few times my bow thruster comes in handy as I can use it to help her with the bow lines. :)

I do usually ask for a T-head though most places I go just to make it easier on both of us. Doesn't always work out but does not hurt to ask.


John
1997 Trojan 440 Express

"Son, I've got a very low bull$*%t tolerance" -- Pancho Carter

Homeport: Baltimore, MD Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 07 2014 :  10:23:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ron:

Bowline loops for the bow pilings are good because if someone puts a line over yours you can untie the knot without fighting his lines. A large loop can usually be put over a tall pole using a boat pole.

I always call ahead to learn how I will be docking so there is plenty of time to get the lines ready before I approach the slip.

My stern lines are always attached so it is easy to toss them ashore if there is a dock master.

In calm weather for just an overnight I may not use all the poles depending on the situation. Some times the poles are way far out and unnecessary. Every situation you will encounter is different. The key to maintaining a happy first mate is to always be prepared. Take your time and tell her that there is no hurry. Sometimes people feel pressured to get tied up quickly if there is someone waiting on the dock for a line, so what let them wait. The admirals happiness is far more important than some dock guy.

Invest in a set of headphones so you can clearly talk to each other. Do not get voice activated because only one person can talk at a time (simplex operation) and wind noise will take control. No shouting , ever, you have control of the boat. Tell your wife many time to not try to move the boat by hand that is your job with the engines.



Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

jmeirhofer

RO# 30972



Posted - Feb 07 2014 :  10:45:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Speaking of headphones Bruce. My wife and I both have bluetooth headsets for our cell phones. I do not know why we did not think of it sooner but the last time we went out last year for the short haul and pump out prior to winterizing, I simply called her cell while she was on the bow. Both phones stayed in the cockpit so there was no danger of losing them and it worked perfectly. Just an FYI if someone is thinking of purchasing two/ways.

John
1997 Trojan 440 Express

"Son, I've got a very low bull$*%t tolerance" -- Pancho Carter

Homeport: Baltimore, MD Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 07 2014 :  10:52:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good idea I have just had too much trouble with ear phones in past but they are probably better now but I already have the headphone radio with mouth piece.

Whatever works as long as you can talk.



Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

Capt. Bill1

RO# 2017

Posted - Feb 07 2014 :  11:34:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rawidman



So my question is, as a transient, how do I get my lines on the pilings when entering and off when leaving? Which end should be on the piling and how should it be secured?



You stop short and put the lines on the pilings before backing all the way down into the slip.

It's either that or you back in and get stern lines on with slack and then move forward to the outer pilings and set your lines. It all depends on the wind and current.

One trick if you have a bad cross wind or current is to use a running spring line that you can put around the outer up wind/current piling. That line leads from your bow to your stern. You keep your bow at an angle into the wind or current and bring your stern in next to the up wind/current outer piling. Then lead the line from your bow around the piling and tie it off at your stern. That way as you back into the slip the piling slides along that line and it acts as a spring for both your stern and bow. Keeping either from blowing into the dock or boat next to you on the down wind/current side as you straighten up and back in. After you're in you can set traditional bow and spring lines.

Also in cases like you are describing you can cleat your lines off to the boat and then loop the lines around the pilings and them lead them back to the cleat on the boat. That way when it comes time to leave you just release one end of the line and pull it back around the piling to you.




Homeport: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Feb 07 2014 :  14:01:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Finger pieces are not needed to tie the boat...

Backing in a transient slip which only has a pair of piling at the entrance, I back in just enough for the boat to stay between the pilings and so that the widest part of the boat is next to the pilings. We pass a line on each piling and use that as a spring. Then we back in , secure the crossed stern lines to keep e boat centered and last a couple of bow lines.

I always find it funny to see transients coming in and tie their stern first, then bow as it usually results in some mad dashes back and forth to prevent the boat from hitting the dock. Same result if you tie bow lines first, it doesn't prevent the boat from backing into the dock unless the boat is smaller than the slip which is usually rare.


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

mixman

RO# 25362



Posted - Feb 07 2014 :  22:53:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm going to add my 2 cents to the above comments. I'm not sure if what I have to say is worth 2 cents, but here goes:

Bluetooth headsets:
quote:
I simply called her cell while she was on the bow. Both phones stayed in the cockpit so there was no danger of losing them and it worked perfectly.


Did you try that when we were all at Worton Creek with no cell service? :-)
The real marine headphones are the things to get. Too many places, even on the Chesapeake, are lacking in cell service (especially anchorages). We've used the Eartec units for years. It's nice to be able to have a private conversation when docking (yes, you can even call each other names and keep the "show" private - although it does freak out dock hands at times :-).

quote:
Also in cases like you are describing you can cleat your lines off to the boat and then loop the lines around the pilings and them lead them back to the cleat on the boat. That way when it comes time to leave you just release one end of the line and pull it back around the piling to you.


An excellent trick, especially for short stays.

quote:
Bowline loops for the bow pilings are good because if someone puts a line over yours you can untie the knot without fighting his lines. A large loop can usually be put over a tall pole using a boat pole.


Proper etiquette is to "dip" your lines I believe, but that's a very rare thing to see people do. It also takes extra effort.

quote:
I always find it funny to see transients coming in and tie their stern first, then bow as it usually results in some mad dashes back and forth to prevent the boat from hitting the dock. Same result if you tie bow lines first, it doesn't prevent the boat from backing into the dock unless the boat is smaller than the slip which is usually rare.


Watching people dock can be so much fun! I have friends who have RV's and the same thing goes on at RV parks, but they're even harsher. They don't stop watching just at the RV being put on it's pad, but they keep watching to see if the "crew" knows how to hook up water, waste, power, etc. Harsh! :-)

Ron, I do not have the mileage that Pascal and Capt. Bill have under me, but I've been all over the Chesapeake, to the Abacos a few times, and down the SE Coast of Florida quite a number of times. It all depends on the situation, slip layout, current, wind, etc. We prefer to stern-in to any slip, but have gone bow-first when necessary. Do you have twin engines and/or a thruster? How your boats handles can really influence how you dock. When we stern in with non-floating piers I stay at the helm and maneuver the boat in the slip so my wife can get her lines on the forward pilings. Then I worry about the stern lines as with my props 10 feet apart I have great maneuverability. I personally prefer dock hands stay away as they are not in on the conversation my wife and I are having and keep trying to grab my lines. I usually try and ask them to be patient. Experienced ones figure out pretty quickly to just wait for the tip :-)

One last comment: I prefer smaller slips to larger ones, especially if I'm by myself. My beam is 10', so a 12' slip is great as once I'm between the pilings I'm not going anywhere. Even with the two of us on the boat it can be a real challenge to get tied up in a larger slip, especially with wind or current. Often we have to specify we want a smaller slip as marinas are so used to people wanting the largest slips they have available.


--Kurt

20mph cruise at 5-7gph. Two hulls are better than one!
This is an ethanol-free boat.

Homeport: Chesapeake Bay Go to Top of Page

jmeirhofer

RO# 30972



Posted - Feb 08 2014 :  05:53:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good point Kurt. I had not considered lack of cellular availability.

John
1997 Trojan 440 Express

"Son, I've got a very low bull$*%t tolerance" -- Pancho Carter

Homeport: Baltimore, MD Go to Top of Page

HOGAN

RO# 3813



Posted - Feb 08 2014 :  06:43:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Remember to factor the tide into the equation when setting lines. You don't want to tie up tight at high or low tide and be screwed when the tide is the opposite.

_________________________


1999 Trojan 440 Express
2005 Scout 175 Sportfish

MMSI# 338049724




Surly to bed, surly to rise...

Homeport: PennyBridge Marina, Stony Point, NY Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Feb 08 2014 :  07:12:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good point about doubling the lines, I usually do that in transient situations so we can untie from the boat.

What I always do when I run the boat with Naomi is talk about the line sequence before coming in. We use numbers for the lines, 1 to 4 from bow to stern so the sequence is often 2143 when tying alongside or 3412 if backing in a slip. Easier to remember. After each line Is secured especially the spring, she gives me a signal with the nr and a thumbs up since I can't hear her from the enclosed skylounge.this is especially important with the spring so that I know I can use it if needed

The only time we ve had issue is when there is a dock hand who doesn't follow directions and doesn't secure the line where we ve planned. Or who thinks he is superman and can wrestle a 70 footer by myself. Over all I almost prefer not having dockside help...


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 08 2014 :  08:11:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes dipping lines is good but I rarely see it done and is difficult if pole top is far above the existing line. IMO dipping May be used at some clubs but is theoretical otherwise. More often the next guy in uses granny knots on top of my line. The bowline loop may always be untied.


Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

rawidman

RO# 25110

Posted - Feb 08 2014 :  17:14:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks everyone. For some reason, after several years, MS Outlook now thinks messages from this site are "junk" mail and I don't get them.

It seem like looping the lines around the pilings and back to the boat might work best for one or two day stays at least. Given a choice, I would take a T head or facedock.


Ron
2000 Camano Troll

Homeport: Charleston, SC Go to Top of Page

mixman

RO# 25362



Posted - Feb 08 2014 :  20:44:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ron,

In my personal experiences, T-heads go pretty quickly as they're usually reserved for larger vessels that can't fit in a slip and are usually more money on busy/holiday weekends. Getting into a slip isn't a bid deal. Heck, non-floating piers give you two wonderful pilings to pivot on. "DON'T BE AFRAID OF THE PILINGS!" :-)


--Kurt

20mph cruise at 5-7gph. Two hulls are better than one!
This is an ethanol-free boat.

Homeport: Chesapeake Bay Go to Top of Page

Andy65

RO# 25185

Posted - Feb 21 2014 :  21:02:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They are making it too complicated. Leave a bow line on one piling, a bow line and spring line on the other piling. A 6" stick on the pilings to hang the lines on. Lines on the dock preferably with snap hooks and a stick or nail for the hook. Back in. From the swim platform, grab and snap the stern lines, crossed. You are not going anywhere. Go forward and do the bow and spring lines. Leave a piece of yarn or dye mark for the length of the bow lines. A loop for the spring line.

Tip. If you can't back close enough to the dock, attache a stick to the dock that swings out horizontally. Leave a stern line on the end of the stick so itis a foot closer to you. Push away if when done.



Homeport: Go to Top of Page

Capt. Bill1

RO# 2017

Posted - Feb 22 2014 :  04:56:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
He is asking the question as a transient boater.

"So my question is, as a transient, how do I get my lines on the pilings when entering and off when leaving? Which end should be on the piling and how should it be secured?"

So he would have no permeant lines to use.

By the way, what do the snap hooks on the stern lines you meantion snap on to on your boat?




Homeport: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Feb 22 2014 :  06:38:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Andy65

They are making it too complicated. Leave a bow line on one piling, a bow line and spring line on the other piling. A 6" stick on the pilings to hang the lines on. Lines on the dock preferably with snap hooks and a stick or nail for the hook. Back in. From the swim platform, grab and snap the stern lines, crossed. You are not going anywhere. Go forward and do the bow and spring lines. Leave a piece of yarn or dye mark for the length of the bow lines. A loop for the spring line.

Tip. If you can't back close enough to the dock, attache a stick to the dock that swings out horizontally. Leave a stern line on the end of the stick so itis a foot closer to you. Push away if when done.



Stern lines should not be secured first unless you are sure wind or current is pushing the boat away from the dock.

Spring lines first so the boat doesn't hit the dock.

I set my springs so the boat can't touch the dock, yet can come close enough for me to reach the stern lines from the platform.


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page
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