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 Animosity - Real or Imagined?
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Author Previous Topic: How hardy is a sailboat in bad weather? Topic Next Topic: So Ive been a stink potter forever  

DRideout

RO# 30964

Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  09:34:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
(I would be surprised if this topic has not been discussed at some other time on here but my very limited search didn't uncover it. Please excuse me if this is a repeat.)

I love boating and boats. Whether it be the rich history, romance and efficiency of wind power, or the ingenuity and engineering marvel of engine power, both fascinate me. They both have their pluses and minuses but they are still boats. Recently my wife and I decided to get back into boating after about ten years away from it. We were looking at both 'modes' but decided in the end to take the path of 'power' for a variety of good reasons at this point in our lives.

What I found interesting was how some of the people we know who are sailors, jokingly made comments like, "Oh, well I guess we can't talk to you now" once they found out we purchased a power boat. I have seen this before in the past where there seemed to be a division of camps when it comes to power and sail. It is something I have never understood or really paid much attention to. I was just wondering if it is just my imagination, some local dysfuntional peculiarity, or just a long standing joke that started way back when power boats were first introduced. Kind of like horse and buggy v.s. automobiles?

I would be interested to hear if any one else has noticed this, had experiences with this (positive or negative) or whether you think I am just full of crap and am further perpetuating this silliness by even asking the question. ;)

.
Derek - 1995 Wellcraft Martinique 3200

Edited by - DRideout on Dec 11 2008 10:52:30

Homeport: Sarnia, Ontario

rduhon

RO# 29321

Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  10:02:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Where we live and boat, there is no animosity for different boats. There are some sailing groups, some powerboat groups and some
groups with both.
This past May, there was a big festival that lasts a couple weeks here. There was an old trawler that came in after dark that
wanted to back into the seawall where everyone else was, but the only spaces open were next to sail boats. The crew said that
they would not tie up next to sail boats.
All of us were not sure why, so the next morning when they backed in(next to a sail boat) we asked why. They said that where
they boat at in Texas, powerboats and sail boats don't mix. That was news to us. They ended up having to back in next to 2
sail boats in order to get a good spot on the seawall, and ended up having a great time with everyone, including the sail boaters.
They did cause a little ruckus because they thought the sailboats should all be at the end of the seawall and the powerboats
together where all the action was at.
They did step on a few toes for thinking the locals should move their boats so they can get in a prime spot after showing up
at the last weekend...



Homeport: Lake Charles, La Go to Top of Page

nwaring

RO# 16045

Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  11:11:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Our club is 2/3 sailboats and yes there is some distinct division but it is usually just the snickering of small groups. Heck, we have a division among the power boaters based on a dock b dock etc. I share a dock with a beautiful 4o or so Irwin. My wife and I dont let it bother us as we have known more sailors over the years than the powerboat guys. I like sail boats and love sailing I just choose not to own one. Our club has a sail club that does a pot-luck dinner every Friday and I believe we may be the only power boaters that attend.
Niles


"Interlude"
87 Mainship 36DC
2006 22' Angler/225hp E-Tec

Homeport: Ashtabula Oh - Punta Gorda Fl Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  11:24:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There are some common behaviors, maybe misbehaviors is better, that are the basis of some stress between the two.
Power boaters are known for throwing wakes, running noisy generators, having noisy parties and a indifferent attitude toward those around them.
Sail boaters are known for hogging the mid channel, not monitoring VHF, demanding a non existent right of way, allowing their halyards to clank against the mast all night and a generally unwarranted superior attitude vs. power boaters.
Powerboats and sail boats may swing differently at anchor as well.
As with many things it is lack of courtesy that is at the root of the animosity today.



Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

Robyns Nest

RO# 4846

Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  11:25:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes the 'stink pots' hate the 'stick and rag merchants' (as my cousin from London says), and visa versa.

2 different cultures colliding on the docks of the world.

Both sides have a much different mindset, much like liberals and conservatives.



__________________________________________________
2003 56 Post Convertible 2x1300HP V12 MAN
2018 30' Sea Hunt Gamefish 2x300HP Yamahas
--------------------------------------------------------
"The future ain't what is used to be."
- Yogi Berra

Homeport: Monmouth Beach NJ Go to Top of Page

sugilbert

RO# 3854



Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  12:30:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by pdecat

Powerboats and sail boats may swing differently at anchor as well.


I'll admit I've never tried it, but willing to give it a try! Any advice as to how to get the Admiral to go along?


Steve
"L'Chiam" 29' 2000 Regal Commodore 2660 (2765) T/4.3 Alphas

Homeport: Michigan City/South Bend, IN Go to Top of Page

Bliss

RO# 2743

Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  12:39:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well said, Bruce.


Homeport: Reef Point Racine, WI Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  14:30:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Steve:
Sailors are into tiny cabins and all those ropes and stuff so read up on bondage and go find your kama sutra.


Bruce



Edited by - pdecat on Dec 11 2008 14:37:34

Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

Joeshoes

RO# 1967

Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  17:02:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Around here in NY the stink potters ridicule the rag fags and vice versa. It has been going on for as long as I have been sailing.

I really do not think that it means too much or that they are all that serious in their mocking.

I own a power boat and race on sailboats a few times a week during the season, so I have one foot in each camp. I do not put much thought into the barbs from either side.


To learn who rules you, simply find out whom you are not allowed to criticize. Voltaire

Homeport: Manhasset, NY Go to Top of Page

Ghost

RO# 689



Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  17:16:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you understand why Subaru and Volvo owners don't seem to mix well with SUV, Lexus or truck owners, then you might get that the vehicle "style" has less to do with it, than the social reasons that people gravitate to particular vehicles.

I don't think I would be too far from the post to say that on average you will find sail owners in the Obama camp by a statistically significant margin. The reverse being true for power boats. Now, personally I don't have anything against sailboats, and in fact find many of them to be rather neat and nostalgic which appeals to me. So, in short, again I don't think its the vehicle itself and causes the two crowds to not mix well.



What part of GALE WARNING did you not understand?

Homeport: Everett Wa Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  18:42:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"hate" is definitely too strong a word... we're both sailor and power boaters and enjoy both. sometimes we take teh split personality to such extreme as leaving the Hobie 16 tied to the stern of the Hatteras at the marina... whenever we get a chance to go for a sail with a friend who has access to a J24 or Catalina 27, we dont' pass it...


if some sailors are too narrow minded to hold a grudge against powerboaters... or when powerboaters feel they are higher up the food chain than sailors, their loss... i dont' care to intereact with them.



Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

Radioactive

RO# 3238



Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  19:02:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am a powerboater, and have sailed. I have enjoyed both. My "arthur-itis" does not care for excessive line handling, so for now, I'm a stink potter.

OTOH: I DO have some animosity toward -some- jet-ski operators...

Overall, anyone who is, or is sincerely attempting to be, a mariner is just fine with me. Anyone who wants to play, without reading the instructions needs to be sunk for entertainment purposes. imo.


Bill

"No matter where you go, there you are." -- Buckaroo Bonzai
"There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." - Kenneth Grahame

Homeport: MS Gulf Coast Go to Top of Page

boatbum

RO# 36

Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  20:09:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I look at it this way. There are two kinds of people in the world. There are boaters (1), and then there are people that suck (2).

Sure there are some that love to tout the notion they are more environmentally responsible. And then I will question them regarding their cars and how many they have, and how they heat their homes etc.. Or I point out how many sail boaters have converted to trawlers.
By and large our trip down the ICW to the Bahamas (1600 nm) has taught us that there is no difference and that we all hold quite a bit in common.



Homeport: Go to Top of Page

Joeshoes

RO# 1967

Posted - Dec 11 2008 :  21:07:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
BBum:

You wrote:

..I point out how many sail boaters have converted to trawlers."

I think that that usually happens when a sailor either loses his crew for the umpteenth time, his wife finally refuses to go out on a boat that is continuosly "tipped over" or mostly because he gets too old to muscle the lines.

my 2 cents


To learn who rules you, simply find out whom you are not allowed to criticize. Voltaire

Homeport: Manhasset, NY Go to Top of Page

boatbum

RO# 36

Posted - Dec 12 2008 :  07:52:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Joe I'm in complete agreement with you. I guess they figure life is too short to waste it putting around at 4 knots. Which, is actually what they are doing for the most part. We rarely see people with the sails up. Perhaps 1 in 20. Even down here on the bank. They have schedules to make and doing so at the mercy of the wind is folly.


Homeport: Go to Top of Page

Joeshoes

RO# 1967

Posted - Dec 12 2008 :  10:27:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dan:

I got rid of my sailboat 8 years ago and bought a powerboat when I stopped racing my boat. I realized just what you say.
I would be motoring here (NY) 50 percent of the time due to lack of wind and another 25 percent of the time when I wanted to go in the same direction that the wind was blowing from and I did not want to tack for time reasons. Add in the fact that sometimes you are in a hurry and need to power, you are sailing at best 15 percent of the time.

Also. I wanted to be able to do 15 or 20 knots if I wanted to. For these reasons I went power. The upside is that I usually putt-putt along at 8 or 10 knots, having been used to 4 knots in the sailboat. But I still prefer the smoother ride of the sailboat.


To learn who rules you, simply find out whom you are not allowed to criticize. Voltaire

Homeport: Manhasset, NY Go to Top of Page

Prospective

RO# 23085

Posted - Dec 12 2008 :  13:43:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I find the animosity between sailors and powerboaters to be pretty good natured most of the time. We all like to be out on the water and a good responsible boater is just that, whether on a sail or power boat. I own a powerboat but that's only been for the past 3 years. I've been sailing all my life and still spend a fair amount of the summer racing aboard other boats. But I own a powerboat because my family with 4 young kids likes to cruise and they are more about the destination than the trip. When they get old enough to sail and enjoy it, maybe we'll switch. My yacht club if very sailing oriented and sponsers many regattas. But many of the most ardent sailors also own power boats.

Anyone, sail or power, who genuinly dislikes and disrespects (as opposed to just good natured poking fun) an entire other group of boaters just based on the mode of propulsion is ignorant and has not met enough people from the other tribe.


1990 Tiara 3600 Open
Twin 3208 CAT Diesels

Homeport: Barrington, RI Go to Top of Page

Gregory S

RO# 2620



Posted - Jan 30 2009 :  18:56:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Interesting that every response on this topic (and in the sailing forum) is from a power boater.


Homeport: Norfolk, Va Go to Top of Page

Radioactive

RO# 3238



Posted - Jan 30 2009 :  19:13:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Greg: not entirely true. Many that you are classifying as stinkpotters have also sailed, some extensively, but are currently putt-putting. But I agree, that a -current- sailor's input would be refreshing. pelaka7's input would be interesting. ( If we can get him off of those S Pacific tropical beaches ).

Bill

"No matter where you go, there you are." -- Buckaroo Bonzai
"There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." - Kenneth Grahame

Homeport: MS Gulf Coast Go to Top of Page

Joeshoes

RO# 1967

Posted - Feb 04 2009 :  08:29:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Greg:

A lot of the pure racing sailors that I race on sailboats with (usually young) seem to genuinely dislike and ridicule powerboaters.

They say "All you need is a gallon of gas and a key to make it go." "The Hairy chest and gold chains on the owners are not optional."

I also think that like any stereotype or prejudice, these folks buy it in general but not in the particular (ie. they like a lot or powerboaters.)

Personally I believe that it takes more talent and expertise to run a sailboat than a powerboat, tacking jibing, line handling etc. But like I said I have one foot in each camp, I own a powerboat.


To learn who rules you, simply find out whom you are not allowed to criticize. Voltaire

Homeport: Manhasset, NY Go to Top of Page

Bliss

RO# 2743

Posted - Feb 04 2009 :  15:33:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've done it all over seven decades. The differences are,on both sides, driven by ignorance, inpatience, lack of courtesy, sometimes booze or testosterone, and the occasional desire to place two objects in same place at the same time. Powerboating and sailing are two very different things that are inconvenienced by being done on the same playing field. Maybe like kids trying to play a basketball game and a dodgeball game at the same time on the same gym floor. I suppose it can be done with a bit of coopertion, patience and courtesy. All that and the occasional bump.


Homeport: Reef Point Racine, WI Go to Top of Page

Bliss

RO# 2743

Posted - Feb 04 2009 :  15:47:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After operating about every size and shape sailboat and single engine powerboat I was literally BLOWN AWAY when I first tried to control a really big twin engined motoryacht. Surprise! They don't act like a Cat D10 tractor on a construction site. By the same token most powerboaters have zero understanding of sailboat stability.
One thing most mature sailors and powerboaters have in common is their wellingness to share their knowledge and experience. So ask for a ride. The answer, undoubtedly, will be yes.



Homeport: Reef Point Racine, WI Go to Top of Page

vriceflyer

RO# 18518

Posted - Feb 04 2009 :  18:14:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We love boats. We have owned and sailed an Alberg 23, a Peterson and a Morgan. About 9 years ago we switched to power and now cruise our Sundancer. Sailboats are so graceful and fun. Powerboats have slick lines and make great cruisers. We have enjoyed and loved both. Politically we are conservative.


2001 340 Searay Sundancer

Homeport: Shreveport, LA Go to Top of Page

delan

RO# 15501

Posted - Mar 01 2009 :  20:03:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have a sailboat, a fishing boat and a standup jetski, It's kind of weird, because it's similar to the the feeling I get pulling up to a group of harleys on a jap bike or Ducati, there's definitely a difference.
I consider myself a boater, plain and simple. I take pleasure from threading a sailboat through a busy anchorage under sail, or backing a single screw trawler into a tight spot, or flooring the throttles on a fast boat. It's all good.

I think people who resent other types of boats are no different from say racist bigotted homophobes, they're more concerned with fitting in at their yacht club than running their boat.

I actually enjoy my yacht club too, but I don't care what you drive.


Bar Owner / sailor / occasional braggart

Homeport: Palm Island, Miami Beach Go to Top of Page

SailArmy

RO# 2656

Posted - Mar 01 2009 :  20:46:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well said, delan!


Homeport: Go to Top of Page

Thudpucker

RO# 10503



Posted - May 25 2009 :  23:41:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Animosity....is when you find a Temp next to a Sailboat who'se lines are slapping against the mast all night long.
Other than that, Whiffer folks have been a pretty nice bunch to be around.

I guess the time I was stuck in the locks behind a big twin Diesel boat and got washed down with dirty slimy diesel exhaust when he fired them smokey stovers up. All I could do was hate!





Homeport: AL. Go to Top of Page

two_rocks

RO# 20862

Posted - May 26 2009 :  12:31:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Walking the docks this weekend at a large marina (we were just visiting) had a mix of boats.

It was amusing how the majority of power boats tied off to the cleats. One big wad.

I'm a power boater (who knows how to tie off to a cleat!), but will get back to sailing one day...walking the dog many times a day forces you to looks at these things.



Edited by - two_rocks on May 26 2009 15:53:58

Homeport: MA Go to Top of Page

Thudpucker

RO# 10503



Posted - May 28 2009 :  00:33:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In Dungeoness Bay, Washington State, 1966 or so, My Uncle, buddy and I had a three day weekend of Salmon fishing and Dunge Crabbing.

I was down at my boat in the evening checking the knots and getting ready for the night.
Along came a guy, turned out to be the owner of the Marina. He had a habit of checking all the knots before he went to bed. Too many surprises over the years had taught him to be perpared.

My boat was the last one on the pier. Nothing behind me but the Bay and Straight of Juan De Fuca.
He sat down on the edge of the Dock and we chatted for a few, and soon we knew a few people in common.
More chat, it got darker, and he suggested a place or two out in the Bay for Dunge's he knew of.
I said; "lets go out for a bit!" and he didnt hesitate. He hopped off the dock, we untied and off we chugged.
While he ran my boat out to his favorite spots, I got the Dunge nets ready.

Soon we are out in the Moonlit bay, all alone, so quiet, Engine off and drifting over his Hi-spots.
We began to nail the Dunge's. Quickly over the limit for two guys, we began culling.
Culling is easy when you are catching them live and throwing them back without harming them. The water was only 10 to 20 feet deep. As a matter of fact, the Dunge's did more harm to us, than we did to them.
We had a great time talking and Culling for an hour or so. Soon he was interested in getting back to finish his rounds and I was interested in a Crab boil so I fired it up and he took the helm to head us back in the right direction. I had a pilot of the local waters at the helm.

I stowed the gear, and made ready to take it to the dock.
Whatta night. My Uncle n' buddy were down at the Dock to greet us.
Tied up, we headed for the Camp fire and some fresh Crab boil.

In those days we just boiled em and ate em. Nothing special in the Boil.
These days with my Louisiana Bride, the stuff (ingrediants) she put's in the Boil itself makes it enough to feed the masses. All you have to do is add the Crabs and serve the King his Feast.

Cherish those memories. Write them down. When you get older they make good evening recall!
And just think of the time your great Grand Children are going to have reading all that stuff.



Homeport: AL. Go to Top of Page

Peleka7

RO# 691

Posted - Jun 16 2009 :  04:16:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Not much difference in the owners of a sailboat or power boat. Nearly all of us love the ocean, want to get away and have adventures. A boat is a vehicle to travel and recreation. We dump endless sums of money into them, bemoan the amount of things that break, cry about the price of fuel, worry about weather and accidents, tire and complain about every aspect of owning a boat. Yet we all still wish we had just another few more hours in the day to continue the boat ride to that favorite fishing hole. We're all crazy, sail or power.


Homeport: O'ahu Go to Top of Page

LDK

RO# 31561

Posted - Aug 09 2009 :  16:41:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If I might, let me provide a perfectly neutral opinion on the "Sailor vs stinkpot driver" issue. Oh nevermind.

LDK
Sailor
Benica, Ca



Homeport: California Go to Top of Page

Concorde27

RO# 31518

Posted - Aug 20 2009 :  14:24:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Since this thread has surfaced I shall add this guy's two cents. I like all boats, motor and sail. I crew with a pretty intense bunch on a J27 in Long island Sound. I do the bow. I absolutely love racing sailboats. Heart pumping, nail biting, adrenalin excitement at 6 knots. Anyone that thinks sailing is for wussies come for a ride with me when its blowing 30 or better. I coach a high school sailing team in the spring and fall. I love working with the kids and teaching racing sailing skills.
I also love cruising in my powerboat. My user name is what I own. I like getting to my favorite anchorage at 20 knots. The missus and I do a bunch of weekend getaways in the summer. I also like the fact that I only need 3' of water instead of 7' at anchor. My boat and I do race commitee several times a year for my yacht club when we host regattas.
Funny thing though, none of my sailing friends give me any crap about having a powerboat, but several of my motorboat buddies never miss an opportunity to crack on me for being a blowboater. Go figure...

Larry



Homeport: Niantic, CT Go to Top of Page

Prospective

RO# 23085

Posted - Aug 20 2009 :  15:02:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
[i]Funny thing though, none of my sailing friends give me any crap about having a powerboat, but several of my motorboat buddies never miss an opportunity to crack on me for being a blowboater. Go figure...

Larry



Ditto what you said. I too race, in Narragansett Bay and love it. But your sailing buddies are alot nicer than mine. I take a beating!


1990 Tiara 3600 Open
Twin 3208 CAT Diesels

Homeport: Barrington, RI Go to Top of Page

Ghost

RO# 689



Posted - Aug 20 2009 :  18:21:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Concorde27

Since this thread has surfaced I shall add this guy's two cents. I like all boats, motor and sail. I crew with a pretty intense bunch on a J27 in Long island Sound. I do the bow. I absolutely love racing sailboats. Heart pumping, nail biting, adrenalin excitement at 6 knots. Anyone that thinks sailing is for wussies come for a ride with me when its blowing 30 or better. I coach a high school sailing team in the spring and fall. I love working with the kids and teaching racing sailing skills.
I also love cruising in my powerboat. My user name is what I own. I like getting to my favorite anchorage at 20 knots. The missus and I do a bunch of weekend getaways in the summer. I also like the fact that I only need 3' of water instead of 7' at anchor. My boat and I do race commitee several times a year for my yacht club when we host regattas.
Funny thing though, none of my sailing friends give me any crap about having a powerboat, but several of my motorboat buddies never miss an opportunity to crack on me for being a blowboater. Go figure...

Larry



In all honesty I'd like to. But tell me exactly how posting something balanced adds to this thread???

If you like sailboats, here's a fun thing to try next time you take your morning walk. My FIL actually turned me on to this one. You know you can by those round cotter pin thingy's at west in an assortment bag for just a couple bucks. You know the little things that hold the rigging pins in and look like the ring on your keychain. As you take your morning walk, every now and then throw a couple of those onto the decks of the sailboats as you walk by. Later on, get your binoculars out and watch the sailors staring up in the rigging for an hour trying to figure out where they came from.

Yeah...sailboats are the best!


What part of GALE WARNING did you not understand?

Homeport: Everett Wa Go to Top of Page

Radioactive

RO# 3238



Posted - Aug 20 2009 :  18:30:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ghost, you have an Evil, Wicked side.

Is that sort of like dropping a 0.75 inch #8 SS screw on the deck of a powerboat?


Bill

"No matter where you go, there you are." -- Buckaroo Bonzai
"There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." - Kenneth Grahame

Homeport: MS Gulf Coast Go to Top of Page

Ghost

RO# 689



Posted - Aug 20 2009 :  19:29:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bill, no. that only works if you bank shot off an open hatch into the engine compartment. When I find screws lying about, I throw them over so I don't trip on them. Actually the lazarette would be best because generators are the marine equivalent of helicopters, always suspect and ready to fly apart at any moment.

What part of GALE WARNING did you not understand?

Homeport: Everett Wa Go to Top of Page
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