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wiseguy

RO# 19739

Posted - Mar 21 2009 :  19:19:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
where can I find how to use one of those oil less air compressors like from Home Depot with a long hose and diving regulator to clean my hull in say from 5 to 10 feet of water.
Is there some where I can find how to instructions.
Nick

Homeport: Punta Gorda,Fl,/Port Charlotte,Fl

Ghost

RO# 689



Posted - Mar 21 2009 :  22:44:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is a joke right?

Since I've had to play cleanup from stupid diving outings, consider this the nice response. But I'm also sitting prepared with both barrels cocked in case this looks like something more than just a shaker bite.

Home Depot...that's a gem.


What part of GALE WARNING did you not understand?

Homeport: Everett Wa Go to Top of Page

captchas

RO# 82

Posted - Mar 21 2009 :  23:18:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If your going to attempt a light job like changing zincs,cleaning intakes,etc a good shallow water oil-less compressor of 5 CFM and
60 psi will more the help your application.
First learn about diving!...Sh1t happens even in shallow water ...
Make sure you have a tender topside watching your u/w work.
If you don't drown the first time, you may have learned a good way to make some easy money doing what a lot of people are afraid to do!
Learn about diving, be careful and don't get stupid,safety first!



Calm Seas and Fair Winds
M/V Freedoms Choice

Homeport: Boynton Beach,Florida Go to Top of Page

wiseguy

RO# 19739

Posted - Mar 22 2009 :  11:04:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
At the marina I have been watching divers use these little 110 plug in type compressor with long air hoses to go under water in shallow water at the slip and clean the hulls of boats.
I now use my own air tank and scuba equipment to clean mine hull and also check prop and zincs.
I was thinking of leaving the tank on the deck and running 50 ft hose with regulator and go under and do my cleaning and checking.
But also looking to add one of these portable units.


Nick

Homeport: Punta Gorda,Fl,/Port Charlotte,Fl Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Mar 22 2009 :  11:18:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I suspect that dive compressors are much different than the typical HD unit but hey it is your lungs.

Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

froggy3k

RO# 4247

Posted - Mar 22 2009 :  11:50:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Personally, I use my full gambit of diving gear going under our boat. Granted, my vis is about 6" on a good day on the Chesapeake but if I get hung up, I don't want to be under a time constraint to get out (100 cf tank). I would feel uncomfortable with a hose hanging off me in 0 vis. I also try not to do it in a marina due to stray current. If I do, I always unplug my boat as well as not run the genny while at anchor. Doing it alone I don't take chances. Yes, I have a spotter and run the dive flag, even at the slip. I've seen others use the setup you're talking about but personally, it's just more stuff to lug around and have power nearby. I'd probably pull the compressor off the dock with the hose and fry. :) My dive stuff is always aboard.



Homeport: Sunny SW FL Go to Top of Page

Ghost

RO# 689



Posted - Mar 22 2009 :  11:55:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well the added description helped a bit. I think you will find that those are either professional, in which case your going to be in the 4 digit cost range, or something you don't want to touch. Yes, I know enough about compressors/regulators/filters to build one, but you will notice that I don't. Go talk to your local commercial store and ask how many of those guys build their own machines. Don't let anything come between you and the door.

There is an order that I would suggest.

1.) Continue to use SCUBA as usual. It's bulky and if its standard off the shelf fare, it swims around more than you do. Better than a Snorkel though, but only slightly. Standard recreational fare is a nightmare when you need control in the 1st 5 foot of the water column which is actually the hardest.

2.) Continue using SCUBA but reconfigure the gear to be a purpose rig for boat bottom cleaning. Note that a lot of the "professional" boat cleaners don't ever get this far. Get a ridgid backplate and stage rig the tank under your arm. Lose the BC and wear just enough weight for the surface. This works well with a standard aluminum 80, even better if you own a 40. Visit your local cave diving shop to figure out how to rig a stage. You will use all existing equipment and not have to purchase more than $10 bucks worth of stuff other than a backplate if you don't already have one. This will make you streamlined in the water. Yes, I did say lose the BC. In the 1st 5 feet of the water there is not a BC made that compensates faster than your own set of lungs. Learn to weight yourself neutral at the surface, eyeball to waterline, forget everything any recreational instructor ever mis-told you about buoyancy and you won't need a BC.

3.) Buy a hookah hose kit. It will sit between your 1st stage and 2nd stage regulator. The tank will stay on the boat. You will need just a basic backplate or web harness to wear. Even more streamlined, but hose supplied and tethered.

4.) Go full meal deal hookah. Go talk to Brownie's next time you cross to the East side and do it right. It will cost you. Few people do it because its overkill to clean a bottom that frankly you could easily clean with just a snorkel (if you really know how to use one).

5.) About 15 foot of PVC pipe from HD and a broom head. Use if often and only go swimming for barnacles.


What part of GALE WARNING did you not understand?

Homeport: Everett Wa Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Mar 22 2009 :  12:03:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
my divers use regular tanks on the dock with a long hose.

Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

padfor

RO# 10176

Posted - Mar 22 2009 :  16:46:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you want a compressor driven hooka, spend the $2,000.00 for a safe unit. The small oilless will not operate a second stage scuba regulator; they are generally designed to work at at least 150 psi.

Due to the depth limits of a compressor driven hooka system, I could not justify the cost just to clean the bottom of my boats. I just strap on the tank and other scuba gear and jump in. I use suction cupped handle to keep me in place while I service the bottom and drives. I think a hose to the surface would just be something else in my way.

If you think that scuba is expensive, price a funeral. Be safe.





Homeport: Texas Go to Top of Page

cmariner32

RO# 7269

Posted - Mar 22 2009 :  23:31:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I guess I'm really dumb, but I've used a Huffy oiless compressor from HD and a Hookah regulator with 50' of diver airhose (the yellow one) for the last several years. A dockmate who is really into scuba sold me the regulator and airhose because he didn't use it anymore. He used the same brand compressor. I bought a stainless steel inline air filter from an online scuba supply house in Texas just to give me some added protection. I only use it sparingly-basically to change the propshaft zincs or check my running gear 3-4 times over the season. What danger am I putting myself in with a setup like this? (I am actually serious-I told you I was really dumb) And, by the way, I saw an ad in a magazine q while back for a company selling the exact setup.

The only thing that works on an old boat.....is the Owner.

Homeport: Clearwater/St. Pete Florida Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Mar 24 2009 :  15:42:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ghost, I'm genuinely curious. You mentioned rigging the tank as a stage. Why sling the back gas instead of keeping it on the plate?


Wiseguy, if you're diving under the boat, I'd STRONGLY recommend wearing at least a hood, no matter how warm the water. I've got a great scar on the top of my head from a prop blade 5 or 6 years ago.


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

Ghost

RO# 689



Posted - Mar 25 2009 :  02:38:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just find that being able to take a small 40 with me will still get me ample time under the boat, without all the "stuff" hanging off me. I do it just tank & reg and just the plate as a harness to attach to. Depending on what you are doing, its a pain having that tank always hitting the bottom of the boat sticking out around your head. I find having a small stage hanging under my arm is more clearance than a large tank on my back and at some point I just got used to having them there and don't notice them.

Just preference I guess. I try to be very streamlined when climbing under the boat. Just got to where I liked it that way. Like I said, weight yourself and go sans BC for even more control.

In fact I liked the setup of a 20 even better and lets face it, in less than 5 foot of water I can make a 20 last a long time. My only problem is that my 20 is usually filled with 02 and even as shallow as it is, I don't like working under the higher PP and went back to the 40 instead.

I also recommend a hood, but for a different reason and Mike. The neoprene grabs on the hull better. I kind of found that sometimes I use my head to "hold on" with :), hey my arms are busy! A tiny bit of positive buoyancy and you can plant yourself on the bottom of the boat! I'm gonna wish I never posted this...


What part of GALE WARNING did you not understand?

Homeport: Everett Wa Go to Top of Page

Capt. Bill1

RO# 2017

Posted - Mar 25 2009 :  18:04:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"The small oilless will not operate a second stage scuba regulator; they are generally designed to work at at least 150 psi."

I take it you've never breathed a tank dry. :-) A second stage works until the bottle is empty. And they make low pressure second stages for hookah use.

A small oil less compressor works just fine as a shallow water hookah rig. I've seen them rigged and sold for just that purpose. (See below)

"Our original system was the 1000 Hookamax. The system utilized an oil-less electric compressor to supply air to the diver. With the introduction of oil-less home compressors, our design was chosen."









Homeport: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Mar 25 2009 :  19:18:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have used an "oiless" compressor to feed a ScubaPro 2nd stage for many years. The first stage is not needed, just connect the airline directly to the 2nd stage. Works great. Biggest fear, a slug of water coming down the line. Make sure you drain your compressor reserve tank before each use. I have gone to 14' to 18' with no problem. I worked with a ship salvage crew that used an oiless compressor to do inspection dives, they claim they have been to 300' with the same unit.


Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

Ghost

RO# 689



Posted - Mar 26 2009 :  12:32:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Okay, well if were going to let the genie out of the bottle, which I'm still not convinced is a good idea for the intended audience then I'll add something here.

Scubapro produced a number of 2nd stages, some much more finicky than others, but yes most of them will certainly operate at a lower pressure though your ability to adjust them at lower pressures "depends" and I'm not going to get into any discussion here about spring pressures (we have to have limits somewhere). At some point if you can't adjust them into range, they will still work but breath like pigs. Depending on the compressor the delivered pressure is going to spike within a certain range. If it varies too much, often due to the size of diaphram in used in the regulator attached to the compressor itself if there is one, then your 2nd stage is not going to be very happy. The size of the tank attached to the compressor helps with buffering the pressure spikes. Traditional balanced rigs like G250's and newer but similar designs are not going to like this pressure moving around just as when their sticky seat issues years ago caused everyone to hate their 2nd stage for awhile even though the culprit was the 1st stage. For a work rig, you want something you can huff and puff through so you don't want it entirely locked down to where it will always behave either (which is why Octopus rigs are the worst reg to give an out of air diver).

Anyhow, what I'm really trying to say is this. I would not have confidence that just connecting a 2nd stage with the right fittings to a hookah hose is going to be enough and we don't know what people have on their shelves ready to be put into service. Even from scuba 1st stage to scuba 1st stage you are going to need to tune the 2nd stage each time you switch one. Usually, there is a screw of sorts inline inside the hose of most 2nd stage units where the 2nd stage connects. There is a special tool that makes this easyer but you can also do it without, albeit a bit slower through trial and error. Depends upon the mfg. If you don't get some balance into this thing your are going to be at risk of overbreathing the reg and that means your co2 curve is going to spike. Plan on some good headache's. Remember these are shallow working dives. I have a suspicion we have guys breathing some of these things and saying "it works" and yet still can't figure out why they are so tired afterwards and can't concentrate.

Which again is why in the vacuum of having a dedicated, purpose built unit done right, it can just be easier to sling a small bottle under my arm with an already adjusted high performance reg. My stage rigs are the ones with the best stuff on them anyway and ready to go.

Still not sure this is a good idea, given the reason for doing it is budget savings. If these guys want to do hookah I'd personally still be more cofortable with the tank on the boat and a longer hookah hose between a standard 1st and 2nd stage. All considered, just seems less complicated.





What part of GALE WARNING did you not understand?

Homeport: Everett Wa Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Mar 26 2009 :  13:55:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The ScubaPro 2nd stage (mid 70's vintage, rebuilt about 30 times) I use, has a small knob on the diaphragm housing that allows you to adjust the air flow from very minimal to full free flow. The compressor supplies 3 cfm at approximately 90 psi with an approximate 15 gallon tank. I always blame tired on being 50+ in age and lack of concentration on rum and beer.


Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

Ghost

RO# 689



Posted - Mar 26 2009 :  16:19:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The old metal ones were good. In a lot of regs the small knobs don't have enough adjustment to them.

Rum is okay, but you better have some lime in there somewhere or your going to catch scurvey.


What part of GALE WARNING did you not understand?

Homeport: Everett Wa Go to Top of Page

Capt. Bill1

RO# 2017

Posted - Mar 26 2009 :  20:50:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Okay, well if were going to let the genie out of the bottle, which I'm still not convinced is a good idea for the intended audience then I'll add something here.

>big snip<

Still not sure this is a good idea, given the reason for doing it is budget savings. If these guys want to do hookah I'd personally still be more cofortable with the tank on the boat and a longer hookah hose between a standard 1st and 2nd stage. All considered, just seems less complicated."


Good God, just buy a hookah second stage and be done with it.

As to an oiless compressor making you sick, what the heck do you think a Brownie's or Air Sink is? That's right, it's just an oiless compressor hooked to an electric, gas or diesel motor. No fancy air filtation either. You can come up with all kinds of buts and what ifs. But it can be done, has been done and is being done everyday. If the compressor has the right pressure at the right CFM you should be good to go.

If you think this is some kind of home made death trap then stick with a tank and reg.

Both of which of course have turned into a professionally made death traps from time to time over the years. ;-)



Homeport: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Mar 27 2009 :  08:38:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Someone mentioned using such a rig down to 18 FSW.

How do the various gases you are breathing (the 79pct N, 20.9pct O2, and whatever else your Home Depot compressor is picking up and pushing to you) behave under slightly increased partial pressures? (Granted, only just over 1.5ATA)

And what's your plan to bail when the compressor dies? Certainly within swimming distance. Ever seen the pink foam from an embolized diver, either from holding their own breath or being shot up while unconscious?


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Mar 27 2009 :  09:20:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Does a worn out compressor at a dive shop pull in a different mixture of air? Ever been around commercial diving operations and seen the air compressors driven by air cooled "Lister Diesels" pumping air to a diver working at 80' to 100', the air mixture is the same. Only air intake filter is a foam pad, like your lawn mower has. When I was first certified by a local diving club, before all the national alphabet companies got their wallet in the training line up, a requirement for certification was a 50' free ascent. The instructor (retired Navy UDT) had you pull out your regulator and start your ascent. You exhaled the entire way up and still had air when you broke surface. It taught me two things, 1. Never, never, never hold your breath while breathing compressed air. 2. You have sufficent air with in your lungs to make a safe controlled ascent from any depth. Back in those days the "Octopus" was not used, we used the "J" valve tank with a reserve and the knowledge you could make a free ascent. Another requirement was to tread water, not using your hands, for One hour. The course lasted for three months and included everything from regulator maintainance to repetitive dive tables. If you practice safe diving, an oilless compressor works fine for shallow air work.


Edited by - L. Keith on Mar 27 2009 16:06:00

Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

Capt. Bill1

RO# 2017

Posted - Mar 27 2009 :  10:31:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"And what's your plan to bail when the compressor dies?"

The same as if my $3000 Brownie's hookah dies, a controled blow and go. Which I have done. (Well, not really any more. As I've bought a couple of their cumberbun belts which hold a small bailout bottle.)

"Certainly within swimming distance. Ever seen the pink foam from an embolized diver, either from holding their own breath or being shot up while unconscious?"

Luckily no. But just take a Spare Air along and you don't need to worry about it.

Breathing compressed air can be deadly no matter how it was compressed.





Homeport: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Mar 27 2009 :  11:59:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by L. Keith

Does a worn out compressor at a dive shop pull in a different mixture of air? Ever been around commercial diving operations and seen the air compressors driven by air cooled "Lister Diesels" pumping air to a diver working at 80' to 100', the air mixture is the same. Only air intake filter is a foam pad, like your lawn mower has. When I was first certified by a local diving club, before all the national alphabet companies got their wallet in the training line up, a requirement for certification was a 50' free ascent. The instructor (retired Navy UDT) had you pull out your regulator and start your ascent. You exhaled the entire way up and still had air when you broke surface. It taught me two things, 1. Never, never, never hold your breath while breathing compressed air. 2. You have sufficent air with in your lungs to make a safe controlled ascent from any depth. Back in those days the "Octopus" was not used, we used the "J" valve tank with a reserve and the knowledge you could make a free ascent. Another requirement was to tread water, not using your hands, for One hour. The course lasted for three months and included everything from regulator maintainance to repetitive dive tables. If you practice safe diving, an oilless compressor works fine for swallow air work.



Was really a generalized 'food for thought' statement with those in mind that DON'T know the first thing about diving but think they'll be okay with a second stage, long-ass LP hose, and the 12V compressor from their trunk. But you brought up a point that struck me - we've had a commercial outfit doing some work on our piers, and I was floored that the only filtration in the same arrangement that you described, was just as you described.


Afterhtought: Your last sentence pretty much hit it dead on - "If you practice safe diving..."


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Edited by - November Charlie on Mar 27 2009 12:02:50

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Mar 27 2009 :  12:11:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Capt. Bill1

"And what's your plan to bail when the compressor dies?"

The same as if my $3000 Brownie's hookah dies, a controled blow and go. Which I have done. (Well, not really any more. As I've bought a couple of their cumberbun belts which hold a small bailout bottle.)

"Certainly within swimming distance. Ever seen the pink foam from an embolized diver, either from holding their own breath or being shot up while unconscious?"

Luckily no. But just take a Spare Air along and you don't need to worry about it.

Breathing compressed air can be deadly no matter how it was compressed.






But again, is a nondiver or inexperienced diver, or a card-buyer, going to blow and go, or are they going to shrb2rb2@gr5tgr5t+ a kitten, clamp down and bail?

Sorry, the embolized diver thing was a random thought. I've pulled floaters out of the water from fresh to a month ripe, from too young to elderly, and the nastiest, second most bothersome one, was a seriously embolized diver. Might not be germaine to this discussion, but Captain ADD here has random thoughts sometimes.


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

Ghost

RO# 689



Posted - Mar 27 2009 :  15:21:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lets just sum it up this way. You can home build just about anything if you know what you are doing and more importantly why. If you don't, buy something purpose built where the engineers solved the problems for you.

What part of GALE WARNING did you not understand?

Homeport: Everett Wa Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Mar 27 2009 :  16:33:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Better hope it was a Engineer that solved the problem and not a Marketing Director. I've never seen an embolized diver, but I have seen a few tourist die from Lipoid Pneumonia from vacation diving on cattle boats run by dive shops with worn out, oil lubed compressors. For sport, I prefer to free dive, less equipment to hassel with and all the good reef (and fish) are in 40' or less anyway.


Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Mar 28 2009 :  17:02:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fun picture.



My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

Gregory S

RO# 2620



Posted - Mar 28 2009 :  18:26:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
CESA Controlled Emergency Swimming Assent. Wasn't taught 40 years ago when I first certified. Buddy breathing was, don't teach that anymore with alternate air source.


Edited by - Gregory S on Mar 28 2009 18:27:18

Homeport: Norfolk, Va Go to Top of Page

Capt. Bill1

RO# 2017

Posted - Mar 28 2009 :  22:07:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Can't see the pic.


Homeport: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Mar 29 2009 :  11:25:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Never have had any luck posting pics.

Anyways, it was a picture of a stage bottle marked as "OXYGEN" with MOD stickers "70".


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

Capt. Bill1

RO# 2017

Posted - Mar 29 2009 :  13:15:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, that's one way to die.


Homeport: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale Go to Top of Page

Capt. Bill1

RO# 2017

Posted - Apr 06 2009 :  03:30:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"INFORMATION ON AIR COMPRESSORS

How to make your own diving setup

Select an OILLESS compressor with a suitable pressure tank and automatic pressure switch. They are readily available from places like WalMart, Home Depot etc., for $100 to $200 depending on size. For diving, the compressor should be at least 1 horsepower with a minimum output of 2.5 cubic feet per minute at 100 psi. Get a 2HP one if you want to dive with a buddy. The one pictured is 2.6 SCFM rb2rb2@gr5tgr5t 90 PSI and should handle two divers. Unless it is a big boat with a genset, you are only going to be able to run it on shore power or I run mine for short dives from a 2KW inverter. Make sure you get one with a pressure shut-off switch. Some cheaper ones just run all the time with a safety valve that vents the excess and you don't want to be wasting that energy if you are running from an inverter.

You will need a water separator/air filter fitted to the output from the compressor if it doesn't come with one. They are about $20 to $30. Due to humidity on a boat, a water separator with an automatic drain is a good feature but not essential. For a more versatile and permanent installation, you can purchase a belt driven compressor to run off your engine. I ran permanently installed PVC schedule 40 pipe to an outlet in the cockpit to make connecting quick and easy. You will need a bunch of quick connect air couplings to make assembly and disassembly easy when diving. Always use the all brass couplings, the galvanized ones will only last about 7 minutes. Even the "all brass" female couplers use steel balls so rinse with fresh water and spray a little WD40 on them to keep them working. I use a 2HP Gast brand electric compressor that has maintained compressed air on my boat now for over 12 years with (virtually) no maintenance. The compressor should be bolted down so it doesn't move around while underway so remove the manual valve from under the air tank and plumb it to a ball valve to make draining water much easier. If you can plumb the outlet from the ball valve so it vents overboard it will be easier as it is hard to catch the water when it comes out under pressure. (How do I know that?)

You will need to purchase a "Hookah" type diving set that lets you dive to about 40 feet with a compressed air line tether to the boat. Check you local dive shop - the valve is not that expensive - it is made to work from the 80 to 100 lbs per square inch from the compressor, but otherwise it is just like a scuba valve. There are no tanks and it comes with a small harness that anchors the air line to your back. The dive shop may try to sell you a stainless pressure equalization tank that floats on the water surface to provide cooling and give you a small reserve if the compressor shuts down. You don't need this. Always use a long hose (40 ft minimum) for diving to provide cooling and you can hear the compressor from under the water so if it doesn't come on periodically you can head for the surface before the tank on the compressor runs out. I used regular neoprene style air hoses although some have reported problems using commercial air hoses so use with care or use the ones sold for diving.

I made float with a "DIVER DOWN" flag on it and terminated a (multiple) 50 foot air line at the float that came from the outlet in the cockpit. This line has a Tee and two couplings so you can plug in one or two diver lines. That way you can work in a radius around the boat and only use the final length of line for the vertical part of the dive which keeps a control on depth. The float also makes a great storage area for tools, fishing gear, and occasionally fish, out of the water for safety from predators.

You can't get into too much trouble if you restrict your diving to 30 feet but for your own benefit I strongly suggest you enroll in a scuba diving course and get your diving certificate. They teach you a lot more than the problems with nitrogen at depth, and the safety techniques are very important even at 6 feet under your boat.

A reader pointed out that there are significant dangers diving at 30 feet, in particular concerning rate of ascent. I can't stress the necessity too much of doing that diving class and getting certified for your OWN safety.

Another reader pointed out that PVC is not advisable for compressed air lines due to the explosive nature of a failure. He recommends as follows:- "Use of semi-rigid flexible plastic tubing works quite well as a substitute in this application as it is easy to string from place to place, uses common brass compression fittings, and is non corrosive. It will, of course, leak if damaged or excessively heated, but will not explode!"

From yandina (dot) com under "hints".




Homeport: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale Go to Top of Page

wiseguy

RO# 19739

Posted - Apr 06 2009 :  09:00:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys for all helpful info.
I did get certified a few years back but have not been diving since,I will go for refesher.
I am new to florida and just want to see best way to clean the hull of my sailboat and maybe do some more diving down the road.
I will most likely use my tanks with buddy for now and than get other equipment like hooka hose setup in time.
I will use all the great info every one here has suggested as I enjoy all this great Florida boating related activity.
Thanks Cap.Bill and every one.


Nick

Homeport: Punta Gorda,Fl,/Port Charlotte,Fl Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Apr 06 2009 :  09:14:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
40 feet with unfiltered air? Not the greatest thing in the world to do. Again, the contaminants that might not have a serious effect at 1ATA (surface pressure) very well may under an additional one and a third atmosphere of pressure.

My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

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PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Apr 06 2009 :  12:11:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
timely thread as i've been looking into this also for hull and running gear clean up, and the occasional zinc change. 6 to 7' is all i need...

yes, the thought of building my own has crossed my mind... Hookah is widely used in mining and prospection, I've found links and sources for the compressor, tank, etc... but Airline has a basic model for $930 so i'm not sure it's worth trying to rig something... Airline and Brownie seem to be the main players, each claim better experience, etc... Airline seems just as good and significantly cheaper.


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

Capt. Bill1

RO# 2017

Posted - Apr 06 2009 :  12:36:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by November Charlie

40 feet with unfiltered air? Not the greatest thing in the world to do. Again, the contaminants that might not have a serious effect at 1ATA (surface pressure) very well may under an additional one and a third atmosphere of pressure.



Brownie's makes gas engine powered systems that go to 150ft with no special air filtration on them that I'm aware of. As long as you are not sucking in exhaust fumes I can't see what else you'd need to be worried about?

And on a DC or AC powered systems there are no fumes to be concerned with.



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L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Apr 06 2009 :  12:37:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The true leader is DESCO Diving Equipment. They still manufacture the old Navy Mark V heavy dress. Check out the full face air mask.
https://www.divedesco.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=23&products_id=108&osCsid=faff9663741baaa968c2ffb9d33ad194



Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

Capt. Bill1

RO# 2017

Posted - Apr 06 2009 :  13:01:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"but Airline has a basic model for $930 so i'm not sure it's worth trying to rig something... Airline and Brownie seem to be the main players, each claim better experience, etc... Airline seems just as good and significantly cheaper."

Check on Ebay. There is a new 120V Hookahmax system on there right now for $579 "Buy it now" price as well as others.



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sabrejocky

RO# 12195

Posted - May 12 2009 :  17:29:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pascal the diver that is been cleaning my boat uses a standard oilless compressor with a non rubber hose. I have asked him about this set up and he told me that he found this easier than using a tank as there is less chance of him to get hung up on something and this way he has unlimited air for a full day of working under boats. The compressors he has been using are straight from HD, the ones that go for about $150 to $250. I have been looking to install one in my engine room for incase I need to go over the side to cut a line out of the runninggear.

Cor


"Pretty Penny"
1990 50' High Tech Euro
Wellington, Florida
You ain't much if you ain't Dutch

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