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 Sailboat recommendation?
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Naut Home

RO# 30670

Posted - Nov 02 2009 :  20:12:05  Show Profile
Looking for any or all opinions on what type and manufacturer of sailboat to look at. We are looking at purchasing an early 2000 boat around 45 feet, used primarily for cruising for 2 in Georgian Bay for a couple of years then heading south.

Homeport: Port Severn, Ontario

saltysam

RO# 26



Posted - Nov 02 2009 :  21:06:33  Show Profile
Generally speaking, your local waters should show what is thought to be best available. Large numbers of a specific type or design is an excellent tip to what works best locally. Temper you desires with the realization that excellent ventillation is most desirable when cruising in warm environments found in popular southern cruising grounds. Ask lots of questions. I hope you get some additional advice, here, soon!


Cheers!
Bill

Homeport: New River, Ft Lauderdale Go to Top of Page

NorWester

RO# 27594

Posted - Nov 02 2009 :  22:00:52  Show Profile
This is a huge subject!

So, without knowing where you've been - it's tough to recommend where you should go.

I'll assume that you're a complete novice, and have never spent any material time aboard a 40' sailboat. (I don't mean to offend). Generally, you have two basic choices...

1) Modern, light displacement fin-keel, high-volume interior: eg: Hunter, Jeanneau, Beneteau, C&C, etc.

2) Classic, heavy displacement full (or Part-full) keel: eg; Pacific Seacraft, Gozzard, Mikelson, etc.

The "Modern" boats will sail noticeably faster in lighter winds, have far more interior room, etc. The "Classic" boats will have a more sea kindly motion in rough conditions swells. have heavier standing and running rigging, and be much more comfortable to live in for long periods of time. "Classics" will generally have a slightly shallower draft than their fin-keel brethren. (I've put "Modern" and "Classic" in quotes, because I'm not referring to the age of the yacht, just the style).

A third option is the cruising catamaran (Lagoon; P.D.Q.; Leopard; etc.). These have about double the interior living volume, are better in 'rolly' anchorages (most of the Caribbean), are generally faster, but have different (some say negative) characteristics as far as the type of motion underway and upwind performance. They can be difficult to find slips for due to their beam, but have generally very shallow drafts, and often have twin diesels for maneuverability.

As with most things in life, there are many compromises. What works best (for you and your family) for a weekend in Georgian Bay, may not work best for an extended cruise through the Windward Islands, or a Great Circle on the I.C.W. in the USA. The only important thing is whatever you get makes you feel that you are always safe, and generally comfortable!

The only way that you can find out what is 'right' for you, is to get onboard as many different boats as you can. (This actually is the fun part!) Go to boat shows, and prowl around yacht brokerages on weekends! Charter "Modern" monohulls and multihulls in the Caribbean, the Med, or here on the B.C. Inside Coast. "Classics" are harder to get hold of to demo, but their owners usually are willing to chat and even sometimes take you for a sail!


(And, what Bill said!)


Best of luck!




Homeport: Vancouver, BC Go to Top of Page

solar

RO# 12803

Posted - Nov 03 2009 :  06:30:35  Show Profile
You probably need a full keel boat that when you hit those rocks in Georgian Bay the keel will not fall off like bolted fin keels. Another option is a swinging keel. Years ago I sailed Georgion Bay with my boat that had a swing keel that made a great depth sounder as it slid over rocks.

SOLAR

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

Prospective

RO# 23085

Posted - Nov 03 2009 :  10:04:42  Show Profile
Wow, way to big a question to answer effectively. You need to start looking at boats and narrow down your preferences a bit based on layout, usage, price, etc.. Once you have a rough feeling what you're looking for you can check back in.

1990 Tiara 3600 Open
Twin 3208 CAT Diesels

Homeport: Barrington, RI Go to Top of Page

Naut Home

RO# 30670

Posted - Nov 03 2009 :  16:48:58  Show Profile
Thank you all for the quick response. All responses have given me lots to think about. FYI, I operate a 40' Carver at present time. I am hoping with-in a year I will be making the big switch. Any other thoughts or location of good articles would be greatly appreciated. Cheers


Homeport: Port Severn, Ontario Go to Top of Page

solar

RO# 12803

Posted - Nov 03 2009 :  17:07:29  Show Profile
A good magazine is http://gamonyachting.com/. It also has sail boats that you maybe interested in like Whitby 42, Bayfield, Gozard, Island Packet, Alberg, Westsail. All are ocean crossing capable yachts with full keels and are solidly built.

SOLAR

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Nov 03 2009 :  17:23:20  Show Profile
Hinckley Bermuda 40 MK III, best quarter mil (US) you will ever spend.


Edited by - L. Keith on Nov 03 2009 17:24:08

Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

Hyperfishing

RO# 3223

Posted - Jan 07 2011 :  23:55:35  Show Profile
Bayfield is a popular full keel Canuck boat for a reason. But, the shallow Keys and BeeHomms really make a cat the best choice IMO.

Chris

Homeport: Sand Bar, Great South Bay Go to Top of Page

Radioactive

RO# 3238



Posted - Jan 08 2011 :  00:14:59  Show Profile
Chris, uh, the OP likely already bought the boat, used it for two years then moved south.

The OP is dated Nov 02, 2009.

Just wondering.


Bill

"No matter where you go, there you are." -- Buckaroo Bonzai
"There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." - Kenneth Grahame

Homeport: MS Gulf Coast Go to Top of Page

Peleka7

RO# 691

Posted - Jan 14 2011 :  22:54:46  Show Profile
Yep but a good topic!


Edited by - Peleka7 on Jan 14 2011 22:55:29

Homeport: O'ahu Go to Top of Page

Naut Home

RO# 30670

Posted - Jan 16 2011 :  13:00:32  Show Profile
You would think that would be the case....but sadly no. We are still power boaters, but have the Carver up for sale now with a broker and looking for our sailboat. My wife and i still want a less than 10 year old boat, with modern convienences, which always seems to lead us back to the Hunter boats for our price range. We will be heading to south Florida a week today for work, but then taking a week off and getting some sailing in for a few days. We are currently trying to find a good location to get a few days of sailing with instruction on a 35ish foot boat....any suggestions?


Homeport: Port Severn, Ontario Go to Top of Page

Peleka7

RO# 691

Posted - Jan 20 2011 :  18:24:16  Show Profile
Stay away from Hunter!!!!!

There is a reason that they cost less. The hull cost is only 1/3 the price of building a boat, the final 2/3 is in hardware and fitting out. Guess how Hunter gets a lower build cost.

I bought a new one, kept it for a single month, then sold it (yes, I did take a bath on this). Cheapest and thinnest stainless steel deck rails, bimini frame, etc. Also the rig is setup like a catamaran rather than a mono-hull. Unsurprisingly, this works well for a catamaran and not for a mono-hull. Keep away from Hunters unless you are going to be a marina queen.

Okay...anyone who wants to beat me up on this go ahead. My sensibilities were influenced into buying by the great cockpit rail seat Hunter had, disregarding advice of sailors and family members that I respect their opinion about these matters.



Homeport: O'ahu Go to Top of Page

Radioactive

RO# 3238



Posted - Jan 20 2011 :  18:45:12  Show Profile
"a good topic!" -- Peleka7

True.


"anyone who wants to beat me up on this go ahead." -- Peleka7

Not me... my sailing experience is limited to the reason they call the horizontal stick located at the bottom of the sail a "boom". Ouch. I still remember.


Bill

"No matter where you go, there you are." -- Buckaroo Bonzai
"There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." - Kenneth Grahame

Homeport: MS Gulf Coast Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Jan 21 2011 :  08:32:16  Show Profile
great topic even though the OP is over a year old.

I had never heard of Gozzard until last fall when I stopped in Rock Hall MD. You dont' see too many of them down here. I got to get on board a 40ish and was really impress by the design, layout and workmanship.

i'd like to sell my boat in a year or two and get a sailboat instead. havent' decided which way to go just yet, we're heavily leaning towards a catamaran in the 40/44 range. the big advantages of the cat are

-more space
-less rolling on the hook
-no cave effect, saloon has nice views
-shallow draft
- no healing underway

the draft is the big one... most monohulls in the size we're looking for draw over 6' and that is just too much as we loose many anchorages and passages in the bahamas, as well as most of the keys

on the downside, they obviously don't point as well as monos and i cant' say that I've seen a good looking catamaran yet.



Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

Naut Home

RO# 30670

Posted - Feb 13 2011 :  08:52:22  Show Profile
""Stay away from Hunter!!!!!""
I am always surprised at this response! There is no regard to someone elses needs or desires, but quotes like' friends don't let friends buy Hunters'. I would not say Hunters are the ultimate boat, but isn't life about give and take. Like I wrote in my last posting, my wife and i have curtain needs and wants...and the Hunter/ Beneteau/ Catalina type of boats seem to fit them the best. I have done some research and find no substance to your claims other than for some reason you had a very bad experience. I once had a sailor tell me that the only sailboat to buy is one with a steel hull. I asked him why he would only recommend one with a steel hull, and he told me because the amount of times he run her aground, a 'plastic' boat would be in pieces, but his steel boat was still afloat. I feel with my boating knowledge, charts, GPS, and excellent availabiliy of up to date weather, I will hopefully be able to keep my 'plastic' boat afloat and off the rocks. I have sailed a 41' Hunter with the fractional B&R rigged boat with manual winches, and found it sailed great for what I am expecting.
I did get a chance to look at a Gozzard...WOW!!!...but out of my price range.
We just got back from Florida and now have our ASA 101 and 103 certificates, and look forward to continuing my search for a sailboat.



Homeport: Port Severn, Ontario Go to Top of Page

Seadaddler

RO# 31074

Posted - Feb 13 2011 :  13:51:33  Show Profile
A 49 Hunter has made a circumnavigation and there is a few Hunters and catalina's in my marina who are cruising around from Texas and canada,I sailed my 2007 Hunter 36 from NY to Punta Gorda all off shore and 2 days in to ICW in N.Carolina for a Auto repair and than back out off shore around the keys to Punta Gorda.
I plan to sail my Hunter over to the Dry Tortugas,Key West and Bahama's.
You can get alot of boat and all new latest electronics on a Hunter for alot less,more boat for your money and will get you any place you want to go or buy a much older more pricey sailboat and pour more money to up date it.



Homeport: FL Go to Top of Page

Joeshoes

RO# 1967

Posted - Feb 14 2011 :  10:08:00  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by Naut Home

""Stay away from Hunter!!!!!""
I am always surprised at this response! There is no regard to someone elses needs or desires, but quotes like' friends don't let friends buy Hunters'. I would not say Hunters are the ultimate boat, but isn't life about give and take. Like I wrote in my last posting, my wife and i have curtain needs and wants...and the Hunter/ Beneteau/ Catalina type of boats seem to fit them the best. I have done some research and find no substance to your claims other than for some reason you had a very bad experience. I once had a sailor tell me that the only sailboat to buy is one with a steel hull. I asked him why he would only recommend one with a steel hull, and he told me because the amount of times he run her aground, a 'plastic' boat would be in pieces, but his steel boat was still afloat. I feel with my boating knowledge, charts, GPS, and excellent availabiliy of up to date weather, I will hopefully be able to keep my 'plastic' boat afloat and off the rocks. I have sailed a 41' Hunter with the fractional B&R rigged boat with manual winches, and found it sailed great for what I am expecting.
I did get a chance to look at a Gozzard...WOW!!!...but out of my price range.
We just got back from Florida and now have our ASA 101 and 103 certificates, and look forward to continuing my search for a sailboat.




Around here they call these boats "Hunterbenelina", Hunter Beneteau, Catalina. Quality wise they are all about the same. If you wish to spend the weekend or more sitting on them, you are buying the right boat.

For serious offshore I would look elsewhere. Also your price range is probably your number one consideration.

Me, I might buy an Island Packet.


To learn who rules you, simply find out whom you are not allowed to criticize. Voltaire

Homeport: Manhasset, NY Go to Top of Page

Peleka7

RO# 691

Posted - Feb 19 2011 :  01:14:07  Show Profile
Joe...They aren't the same quality. I've owned a Hunter and a Catalina. The hardware on the Catalina was far superior to the Hunter. Not even close.

Totally agree about the Island Packet...except for the Packet Cat. That was a real dog.

Best boat out there will be a catamaran, especially above 40 feet. SOME of the South Africans are decent but many have low clearance or structural problems. Do some research. Lagoon, Alliaura, Dean,Pajots all have some nice stuff. A few out of business cats are worth looking at (Manta in particular).
NOTE...keep the beam below 24 feet or it will be difficult to haul out (300t travel lift maximum).

Also...some of these boats have stupid features, not enough clearance, no trampoline (keep away from this)...Manta has a winch in the middle of the cockpit, one of the Pajot models had entry into the front cabins being a hole 3 feet off the floor (structural problems required a bulkhead), Voyager as an anchor locker so shallow that you have to have an assistant kicking the chain over, etc. Some things can't be fixed, or lived with, other ar ejust a nuisance.



Homeport: O'ahu Go to Top of Page

Joeshoes

RO# 1967

Posted - Feb 25 2011 :  14:07:13  Show Profile
Peleka

Yes, I would agree with you. the generalization is too strong. I think that Hunter is at the bottom of the quality level while the Catalina is perhaps much further up the chain.

In our fleet there a both and I find the Catalina to be nicely appointed and outfitted.



To learn who rules you, simply find out whom you are not allowed to criticize. Voltaire

Homeport: Manhasset, NY Go to Top of Page
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