boat-ed.com
BoaterEd Store      - Help Support This Forum - Join Today!      Hunting/Fishing Stuff
BoaterEd
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register

Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Avatar Legend | Statistics
[ Active Members: 12 | Guests: 220 ]  [ Total: 232 ]  [ Newest Member: MikDee ]
 All Forums
 Forums
 Ask the Captain
 Sea Cock Valves
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: Jazz Funeral for Capt. Phil Topic Next Topic: Diesel fuel treatments???  

LuBell

RO# 30482

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  11:09:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
With this being my first season as a bigger boat owner (the boat and maybe me too) I've been reading about how my AC, electric toilet, and engines, etc have access to raw water through sea cocks. The more I read, the more concerned I get about being responsible for their management and maintenance. I'm glad to check them but I don't have the slightest idea where they are. I've got a 1990 Carver Montego 3257 and would appreciate somebody telling me where to look. Any emergency prep you can offer would also help.
LuBell
Playing, Being, Driving "SEA SHARP"

Edited by - LuBell on Jun 04 2010 11:11:26

Homeport: Chicago, Illinois

millsan1

RO# 25166

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  11:24:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
These will be holes in your hull where water comes through. They should have large handles on valves that control the water flow. Highly recommend hiring your dockmaster or a surveyor or captain to let you knwo details of your boat. It is not that difficult, but better safe than sorry.

2006 Meridian 391
8.1 SHO

Homeport: Bear, DE Go to Top of Page

MikeeH

RO# 6342



Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  11:36:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If your 1990 3257 is laid out like our 1988 was you should have at least 4 seacocks. One each is under the tranny for each engine (not a great location for easy access but that's where they are), one near the center of your engine bay for the raw water that serves the A/C unit and the last one under the access panel that's outside your head which services the raw water for the commode. You may also have one near the holding tank for the macerator; we did not have a macerator or overboard discharge of black water so I can't be certain of that. Keep in mind that each vessel can be different but I'll bet yours are laid out pretty much the same way.

Mike

I recently realized that at this stage of my life I'm now wise enough to know better, but old enough not to give a damn.

Homeport: Still Pond, MD Go to Top of Page

In the know

RO# 20824

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  11:39:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
With this being my first season as a bigger boat owner (the boat and maybe me too) I've been reading about how my AC, electric toilet, and engines, etc have access to raw water through sea cocks. The more I read, the more concerned I get about being responsible for their management and maintenance. I'm glad to check them but I don't have the slightest idea where they are. I've got a 1990 Carver Montego 3257 and would appreciate somebody telling me where to look. Any emergency prep you can offer would also help.
LuBell
Playing, Being, Driving "SEA SHARP"


Start at the systems they support and start following the lines back (also a good opportunity to inspect the lines)

Emergency prep - at each seacock put a tapered dowl in a bag and secure it to the sea cock handle.


--------------------------------------------------------

The enemy of society - the HUTAL

Homeport: The Ocean State Go to Top of Page

Robyns Nest

RO# 4846

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  11:52:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Did you get a survey of your boat. It's common practice to show all thru hull seacocks on a diagram.

Check that if you have it.


__________________________________________________
2003 56 Post Convertible 2x1300HP V12 MAN
1997 20' Boston Whaler Dauntless Mercury 225 EFI
--------------------------------------------------------
"The future ain't what is used to be."
- Yogi Berra

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

mintregila

RO# 13060

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  12:24:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Once you have located each valve, you should exercise it once per month to make sure you can close it easily. Unused, they get stiff and can become frozen making it impossible to close in the case of an emergency.

While you are inspecting the lines and checking the valves, make sure that each hose is double clamped.

Some captains close the valves whenever they leave the boat. I would only do that if it were for an extended period of time since forgetting to open them would also be a problem. However, I never use my raw water wash down so it is always closed.

You did the right thing to ask.



Mark I -
03 Blackfin/SaltShaker 29 Combi
05 290 Amberjack - Sold
90 Viking 38 - Sold
84 Trojan F36 - Sold

Edited by - mintregila on Jun 04 2010 12:25:55

Homeport: Long Beach, NY/Pompano Beach, FL Go to Top of Page

Sandy

RO# 1159

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  13:32:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Along with "good intent" to exercise the handles regularly and grease where axle meets the valve housing, I'd suggest keeping at least one length of pipe handy that will fit over the handle as a leverage extension if the valve sticks and needs to be closed or open or just exercised. It could save your boat and more if a hose or clamp breaks & sure beats a wooden plug if the valve still works. (I still have the plugs though. )

Sandy

Homeport: The Vineyard Go to Top of Page

rawidman

RO# 25110

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  14:13:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robyns Nest

Did you get a survey of your boat. It's common practice to show all thru hull seacocks on a diagram.

Check that if you have it.



If that didn't happen or even if it did, it would be a good idea for the OP to pay a pro to spend a couple hours on the boat pointing out what is what and what it does.

I have a friend who is a boat mechanic and he has a friend/customer that bought a 40 something foot boat as a first boat and moved onto it. He has no idea what does what. For example, he somehow moved all his fuel into one tank and then couldn't start the engine connected to the empty tank.


Ron
2000 Camano Troll

Homeport: Charleston, SC Go to Top of Page

dancerscap

RO# 20150

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  14:31:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you just bought the boat and didn't get a survey my bet is that you will pretty soon, since most insurance companies require a survey to insure. If your co. doesn't, I'd check with others with that company to be sure they are reputable and aboveboard.

I have no idea what that has to do with thru hulls and seacocks.



Homeport: Hudson,Fl. Go to Top of Page

rawidman

RO# 25110

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  17:04:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dancerscap

If you just bought the boat and didn't get a survey my bet is that you will pretty soon, since most insurance companies require a survey to insure. If your co. doesn't, I'd check with others with that company to be sure they are reputable and aboveboard.

I have no idea what that has to do with thru hulls and seacocks.



My surveyor surveyed the boat, provided a several page bound written report with a drawing showing the locations of the seacocks, He also provided suggestions for correcting any deficiencies and suggestions for non-required, but desireable equipment.


Ron
2000 Camano Troll

Homeport: Charleston, SC Go to Top of Page

JimPend

RO# 5022



Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  17:43:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If I were you I'd get some help, you should not take a boat out without knowing everything about it. Seacocks are first on my list, hoses are next, checking for loose wires or loose mounted wires, and on and on and on. The Great Lakes and the Oceans are not very forgiving, it seems like you are clueless. Get someone that knows boats to go over the boat with you.

Jim P.

Edited by - JimPend on Jun 04 2010 17:50:50

Homeport: Port Clinton, OH Go to Top of Page

talexander38

RO# 31109

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  19:00:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
not to beat up on you but.. you really should find someone who knows the ins and outs of a bigger boat they are a different type than you are use to it will help you in the long run..and save you a trouble and money.

HTC(SW) U.S.N. Retired
You'll Know I'm pissed when you hear the breech lock.

Homeport: Hayes Va. Go to Top of Page

walterv

RO# 12640



Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  19:46:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lubell,
All good info above, best advise IMHO, is to get a fellow boater on board to show you the ropes. If you don't have someone, hirer a captain or a surveyor to get you acclimated with your boat.

All of us here were at some point where you are now, your questions are great and we are here to help. A couple hours with someone on your boat would be great for you. Once you get a better foundation the questions you ask (many) will make more sense.

Hey,
If I was in your neck of the woods (and I feel most boaters would do the same) I would be more than happy to run through your boat with you over a few beers and share what I know, IMHO, it would be fun.

You need to get acclimated with a ton of things on your boat, below are a few that come to mind.

Bilge pumps
hoses for all your thru hulls
Sump pump
Dipsticks (motor and transmissions)
Electrical system including battery's, battery chargers, 110 side and all fuses and breakers
Air conditioning (filters, hoses, pump, seacock
If you have any electronics like radar, gps, depth finder you need to know how they work.

There is more, but this would be a good start. The more you know about your boat the better you will feel and it will make you a better captain.

It just takes time and will be a never ending process, but as mentioned I think it is a lot of fun. I have been boating on my own for 32 years, there is not a season that goes by that I don't learn a ton of stuff.

Good luck with the new boat and continue to pick the brains from the people from this site, the more you ask the more you will learn.

Walter


And always remember, life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by those moments that take our breath away.

George Carlin

Edited by - walterv on Jun 04 2010 19:48:55

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  19:52:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The first thing anyone should do on a new to them boat is spend a few hours learning the boat. And i don't mean playing with the gadgets like stereo and electronics but the critical stuff: open every hatch and locate every sea cock, circuit breaker, switch, pump, float switch, hose, sump, tank, etc.

This is critical to your safety and your passengers. On a small boat it doesn't take very long.

And yes seacocks need to be excercized every month


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

btoran

RO# 19401

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  20:15:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
make sure the wife is around when you're exercising any seacocks. they tend to get upset if you do it with someone else.

Bruce Toran
1996 Carver 320 Voyager
-------------------------
"Don't Eat Anything Bigger Than Your Head"


Homeport: Northport, NY Go to Top of Page

Radioactive

RO# 3238



Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  20:25:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What PascalG sez...

One of the very best things you can do with any "new to you" boat is to do your own personal "survey". You do not need any particular skills. Open, look at, touch, everything on the boat. See where it is, what it looks like, how it works, what it is connected to. It can be a bit tedious, but it is also quite interesting. And what you learn about the boat will serve you throughout the boat's life. You will likely find a few things that need to be corrected, and a few thins you never expected to find. And "in the event" of a problem, you will have a much better idea of what is wrong, where it is, how to get to it, and what the consequences of a failure might be ( and how you might attempt a fix! ).

Enjoy your boat!


Bill

"No matter where you go, there you are." -- Buckaroo Bonzai
"There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." - Kenneth Grahame

Homeport: MS Gulf Coast Go to Top of Page

seabug

RO# 18861

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  21:16:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If I were you, first I'd be greatful for the above comments: A few years ago, such good advice would not have been so easily obtained. I had a 40 footer that was sunk by a company replacing an engine -- too late I learned that the well-known company had little big boat knowledge. Also, when your boat is laid up for the season, I recommend the following read and reference book: BOATOWNER'S MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL MANUAL. Best to you for a safe and happy boating season.


Homeport: Ms. Go to Top of Page

HaveADay

RO# 30763

Posted - Jun 04 2010 :  23:01:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey LuBell,

Where are you keeping the boat. I'm in Chicago and could well be able to spend a few hours with you going over the boat.

Ben


-----------------------------------------
Have Another Day - 2003 Carver Voyager 570

Homeport: Chicago, IL Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Jun 05 2010 :  06:51:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lu: all good advice. Boats are not like modern cars that never require the owner to open the hood. Boat are failure prone without regular maintenance and owner inspection. In addition to learning what everything looks like and what its for if you become familiar with the systems when they are working properly then when you make your inspection every time before leaving the dock you will be familiar enough with stuff to spot impending problems.
It takes just a few minutes but before starting engines you should check oil, check seacocks to be sure they are open and examine seacocks, hoses and shafts looking for leaks or changes in condition.
I suggest you take some detailed pictures for study and future reference as somebody shows you around.



Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

rawidman

RO# 25110

Posted - Jun 05 2010 :  08:36:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Sea Cock Valves"

Just for the record, a "sea cock" (also spelled "seacock") is a "valve". "sea cock valve" is redundant.


Ron
2000 Camano Troll

Homeport: Charleston, SC Go to Top of Page

LuBell

RO# 30482

Posted - Jun 05 2010 :  21:26:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks to everybody that jumped in to help out. I've followed and admired this forum for quite a while, so I respect what you all have said. Ben I'd be glad to have you come by and spend some time showing me the ropes while we toast the occasion. I just left 59th Street Harbor and am now docked in Hammond. Get to me at lubellrb2rb2@gr5tgr5tfwparker.org and we can talk about hooking up. Thanks.

LuBell
Playing, Being, Driving "SEA SHARP"

Homeport: Chicago, Illinois Go to Top of Page

LuBell

RO# 30482

Posted - Jun 05 2010 :  21:40:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ben, The email address that showed up is foreign to me. My address is my name at fwparker.org without all the other graphics.

LuBell
Playing, Being, Driving "SEA SHARP"

Homeport: Chicago, Illinois Go to Top of Page

Veebyes

RO# 11224

Posted - Jun 09 2010 :  00:30:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I know builders are in the habit of locating seacocks in the most awkward of places but it is an excellent habit to shut off the seacocks every time you leave the boat for more than a day trip ashore. Hose failure must be the most common reason for boats sinking at the dock or on a mooring. Non operation of seacocks by owners, because the seacocks are in such awkward places, must be one of the most common maintenance neglects by owners.


Homeport: Bermuda Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic: Jazz Funeral for Capt. Phil Topic Next Topic: Diesel fuel treatments???  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Jump To:
BoaterEd © BoaterEd Go To Top Of Page
This page took 0.86 seconds to load
Forum Guidelines and Privacy Notice

Shop BoatStore.net!     Shop for Toys & Games!    Shop for Housewares!

Boatered.com