BoaterEd Store      - Help Support This Forum - Join Today!      Hunting/Fishing Stuff
BoaterEd
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register

Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Avatar Legend | Statistics
[ Active Members: 9 | Guests: 117 ]  [ Total: 126 ]  [ Newest Member: Bumpo64 ]
 All Forums
 Forums
 Sailing and Sailboats
 Begineer Looking to buy a Sailboat
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: DUTCH TEENAGER COMPLETES WORLD TRIP Topic Next Topic: A big, badwater, what if?  

irish1

RO# 32230

Posted - Sep 04 2010 :  19:20:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi All
Wife and I recently took some sailing clases and are looking to buy a small cabin cruiser that could be easily single handed in the LI NY area. Figured on 20' or in that range. Appreciate all of the knowledge and wisedom brought to these forums by its members

Thanks

Irish 1 (Brian)

Homeport: NY

stmbtwle

RO# 7934

Posted - Sep 04 2010 :  19:29:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Look at the Catalina 22. Trailerable, sleeps two in relative comfort four if you're REALLY friendly. There's a BIG class association so you'll meet a lot of friends. Easy to sail easy to trailer and a tough little boat. Ex and I sailed one from Galveston Tx to Panama City Fl and back... the last 500 mi was nonstop in the Gulf of Mexico. No problems.

Willie: Look Ma no paddle!

Homeport: Tampa Bay, FL Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Sep 04 2010 :  21:01:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
any of the Cal, Pearson, Catalina boats will be a good choice. not much cabin in a 20' consider 26-27 for all the usual amenities.

Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 04 2010 :  21:28:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
i agree about the size, 20' with a cabin doesn't give a lot of space on deck, moving around is harder, etc... a 26 to 29 footer may actually be easier to handle than a 20 footer, although for a day sailer a J24 can be a good option too if you really want to keep it under 25

Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

stmbtwle

RO# 7934

Posted - Sep 04 2010 :  21:30:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bigger boats have more room and are steadier, and actually easier to sail; but smaller boats are trailerable, less expensive, and can be more "fun"

Your call.


Willie: Look Ma no paddle!

Homeport: Tampa Bay, FL Go to Top of Page

irish1

RO# 32230

Posted - Sep 04 2010 :  21:58:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think if we can get something we are both comfortable with is steady in the water and not too dificult to sail that would be the main thing. We will most likely be able to get a slip for the season thats a big factor. with this in mind would what you be inclined to think as far as boat size goes.
I really appreciate all your responses

Brian



Homeport: NY Go to Top of Page

stmbtwle

RO# 7934

Posted - Sep 05 2010 :  09:05:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
IMO none of them are "difficult" to sail. The heavier boats are steadier and therefore "easier". You'll learn faster and have more FUN on a light "tippy" boat. I think your original idea of something in the 20' range is good. Even if you slip it, a trailerable boat doesn't put you at the mercy of Marina Management, and allows you to access sailing areas you otherwise couldn't get to.

One of the most fun boats I ever sailed was the Alcort Sunfish. Look at the little beast wrong and you went swimming... but it wouldn't hurt you and you learned REALLY QUICK how to sail it too. A big heavy boat is more forgiving in light winds, and you can get away with a lot of bad habits. But screw up when the wind is up and that same boat can kill you.

Hang out at the marinas in your area and see what boats are the most popular (they're popular for a reason).


Willie: Look Ma no paddle!

Edited by - stmbtwle on Sep 05 2010 09:17:53

Homeport: Tampa Bay, FL Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Sep 05 2010 :  09:40:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"royce's sailing illustrated" is one of the best guides for new sailors.

Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Sep 05 2010 :  09:55:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It is true that you can more easily trailer centerboards but setting the rig each time is a pita. A 16-18’s great for day sailing and to learn the ropes but if you plan on cruising larger keel boats will be better than 20-22’ for many reasons. There are many 70s and 80s 26 and 27’ keel boats around at cheap prices. With practice they make great beginning cruisers. I sailed regularly between NY and cape cod and the islands in a 27’ Catalena.

Many small open sail boats have been used for low budget cruising with some camping gear. Going is more important than size. Catboats were very popular in NY in the past for their great interior space in short length.


Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 05 2010 :  10:00:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
or take look at catboats in the 20/24' range. they have a lot of beam (=more room) and are pretty stable, the mast it all the way forward leaving even more space and are VERY easy to sail since you dont' have to handle a job. We have a 12' Catboat (very similar to a Beetle Cat) as a tender and it's extremly easy and relaxing to sail.



Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

stmbtwle

RO# 7934

Posted - Sep 05 2010 :  12:43:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
BEFORE deciding on a boat you must FIRST figure out what kind of sailing you are most likely going to do, and go from there. Be honest with yourself.

Willie: Look Ma no paddle!

Homeport: Tampa Bay, FL Go to Top of Page

irish1

RO# 32230

Posted - Sep 05 2010 :  19:47:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow Thanks again for all of your wisdom
By the looks of things I do have quite a few choices available to me and I do feel really lucky to havae this opertunity. Whatwe have done so far (wife and I)is completed a basisc sail course 10 classes and and 2 full days in he water on a sunfish in addition we have pent several evenings on the sunfishes since then , boat slip will be on the east end of Long Island NY and would like to be able to sail the bays and harbors of the east end with the hopes of eventually sailing across the sound to Conecticut and eventually further up to the cape and the Islands of Mass I didnt want to get too big of boat but we want to be able to have some adventure now that the Kids are gone and we a have few extra bucks and this window for the comming years. I have always admired and wanted a sail boat. Grew up and Boated/Fished off the west coast of Ireland many years ago and never lost that call.

Regards to All

Brian



Homeport: NY Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 06 2010 :  07:00:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
if want to leave the bays in your area, you're going to need something a little larger than a 22 footer. sure you can cross the sound on a good day but chances are you will be stuck on the other side waiting for weather to settle. also, the longer the boat the faster you can push the hull thru the water as your hull speed increases with length.

then for any kind of cruising in that area, beyond the bay entrance, you need radar due to the risk of fog and preferably an inboard instead of an outboard common on smaller sailboats to get reliable propulsion on choppy day.

you may want to start smaller for a year or two with a an easy to run 20/24 footer (again maybe a catboat) then step up to a 30 footer when you're ready to go beyond the bays.

one issue with sailing, obvious but often overlooked, is that when you get wind, you often get a chop sometimes making the ride miserable if the boat is too small


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

stmbtwle

RO# 7934

Posted - Sep 06 2010 :  07:09:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK now go back to the marina and talk to the folks that do that kind of sailing... Maybe join a yacht/boat club.

I'm not that excited about catboats, you don't have many options when the wind picks up, and they're even slower than a similar-sized sloop.
Also they're a "niche" boat and may be hard to sell later.

Agree with Pascal on the inboard (preferably diesel). When the weather kicks up (and it will) outboards are pretty much useless, you can't keep the prop in the water.


Willie: Look Ma no paddle!

Edited by - stmbtwle on Sep 06 2010 16:05:38

Homeport: Tampa Bay, FL Go to Top of Page

Prospective

RO# 23085

Posted - Sep 07 2010 :  09:06:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sounds like you want to start cruising, ie.. visiting various ports over several days and spending the night along the way. I think that's great. But keep in mind there's more involved than just learning to sail. There's navigation, reading charts, VHF usage, picking up moorings, reading weather, etc.. None of it is rocket science and can be easily learned. In fact you can learn a lot on this website.

As for boat choices, you can make almost anything work but for cruising purposes, a boat that was 28-30ft would be a good start. Tons of choices but check out the Catalina 30 Mark I. Catalina made a ton of them so they are plentiful and cheap. But they made a ton because they sail well and make good use of the the space. Another option would be an older Saber or Tartan 28. Both well made boats that generally hold up well. Don't get too caught up in finding the perfect boat. If you hate cruising you'll be selling it quick, and if you love cruising you'll be selling it quick so you can move up!


1990 Tiara 3600 Open
Twin 3208 CAT Diesels

Homeport: Barrington, RI Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Sep 07 2010 :  09:37:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Irish:
At this point you have received a lot of good suggestions. You have started the process of learning how to sail. Another important part of boating is to know the rules and techniques of boating. The Power squadron near you has some great and cheap courses in navigating sailing etc. USPS.Org will help you find a local squadron.

IMO your plans and budget will determine the boat you buy but experience shows that boats shrink much faster than we can sell them to get the next boat so If the budget allows go larger than you think you want at the moment. When cruising not “roughing it’ will probably be very important to the admiral and above all people should be happy when boating.


Bruce



Edited by - pdecat on Sep 07 2010 10:50:45

Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

solar

RO# 12803

Posted - Sep 07 2010 :  10:40:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you want a boat capable to circumnavigate the world a Contessa 26 will do the job. Tania Abie, a teenage girl, took one around the world. I owned one many years ago that I trailered, and put it through hell with no problems. Do a search of 20 Boats That Will Take you Around the World, or take you anywhere. There are many other smaller salboats that are trailerable and are very seaworthy.

SOLAR

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

Prospective

RO# 23085

Posted - Sep 07 2010 :  11:43:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by solar

If you want a boat capable to circumnavigate the world a Contessa 26 will do the job. Tania Abie, a teenage girl, took one around the world. I owned one many years ago that I trailered, and put it through hell with no problems. Do a search of 20 Boats That Will Take you Around the World, or take you anywhere. There are many other smaller salboats that are trailerable and are very seaworthy.



Yeah, but that was just one small girl and a cat... :-)

Just kidding, you're right. When it comes to boating you can make almost anything work. I used to think we were roughing in when we packed six of us into a 28ft express. Until I saw a couple sleeping under the mooring cover of their bowrider in sleeping bags.


1990 Tiara 3600 Open
Twin 3208 CAT Diesels

Homeport: Barrington, RI Go to Top of Page

solar

RO# 12803

Posted - Sep 07 2010 :  11:52:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
irish1 wants a small boat.

SOLAR

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 07 2010 :  13:07:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Define "small" :)

Reason I mentioned catboats is that they are easy to sail and since irish1 only experiences is with sunfishes I think leaving the headsail out of the picture is a smart move at this point so he can ficus on everything else. Sure cat boats may not be the best performers (although they are very fast on a run) but they are very easy for beginners

Also up north they are NOT a niche market


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Edited by - PascalG on Sep 07 2010 13:22:32

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Sep 07 2010 :  14:04:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Folks that haven’t sailed a catboat dont understand how comfortable they are. They dont beat well but other than that they’re the easiest boats to sail.

Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

irish1

RO# 32230

Posted - Sep 07 2010 :  18:03:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well I certainly thank everyone fo their responses. I ordered the book "royce's sailing illustrated" yesterday. Have looked at a lot of boats for sale on line in the 20 to 28 foot range and promise to spend time at the marinas asking questions and seeing what the most popular boats in my budget range are. I will also look into taking some courses you mentioned again thanks for all your help

Brian



Homeport: NY Go to Top of Page

Hyperfishing

RO# 3223

Posted - Jan 07 2011 :  23:36:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you plan to sail in Great South Bay and enjoy Fantastic Fire Island and the NY State Boat channel, nothing bigger than the 22 with fold up keel. If you draw over three feet, much of that area will be off limits to you.

Chris

Homeport: Sand Bar, Great South Bay Go to Top of Page

Seadaddler

RO# 31074

Posted - Jan 08 2011 :  04:56:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We need more info like how much are you willing to spend on a sailboat and dock fees amd repairs.
Go to Hunterowners.com and ask like many newbies every and talk to long time sailboat owners of many different places and sailboats,tons of info and help.
But choosing a first sailboat is not easy,some say go slow but if your sure you want a sailboat than for what you are saying go at least 30 ft sailboat,I started with sunfish than 16 hobie cat than my first real sailboat on LI with 20001 Hunter and than a 2007 Hunyer 36 and had it in Greenport for 2 season than sailed her to west coast of Florida in 08 and been living in Florida full time.
Like I said not easy picking a boat a Hunter Catalina or if you have the $$$$ Saber and now good deals or to be had,the newer boats are much easier to tail also wi8th inmast like I have.
Nick



Homeport: FL Go to Top of Page

irish1

RO# 32230

Posted - Feb 01 2011 :  19:42:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was looking 30" or in that range I have a slip in CT I like the in mast furling and was leaning towards a Hunter / Catalina / Cape Dory in that range . Safety is important so If I do get caught out there in bad weather I want a boat that will take care of me. Budget wise I can go out to 40K going to be in Miami next week so Hope to take in the show for a day. What made you opick a Hunter and what are the pros and cons Appreciate all your responses



Brian



Homeport: NY Go to Top of Page

Peleka7

RO# 691

Posted - Feb 04 2011 :  22:27:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm not a Hunter fan and I've owned one. The hull is the cheapest part of building a boat. Outfitting is the most expensive. A Hunter has cheap deck hardware and thin stainless steel. It is not an offshore boat and I sold mine to get something to cruise in. A used Catalina will not set you back too much, is much better built, and is a fun boat to sail (I've owned one of these also).
In mast furling reduces the performance as there are no battens. In the boom furling is much better for sail performance. Lazy jacks, dutchman, lazy bags, all work well for much less cost.

Anyone telling you to cruise in a 26 ft boat has never cruised. Yes there are a very few who do this but all they talk about is getting a bigger boat, how slow their boat is, and getting beat up from weather.

You don't need to start with a smaller boat to learn to sail. Get the boat you want and learn to sail it. It's not that hard, which is why there are idiots circumnavigating in a 26 ft boat.



Homeport: O'ahu Go to Top of Page

cwms

RO# 7357

Posted - Feb 05 2011 :  08:01:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For 40k, you can find a pretty nice Catalina 30, even an older Catalina 34. I started with the 30 and now have an '87 - 34' that I paid just over $40k for


Homeport: VA Go to Top of Page

irish1

RO# 32230

Posted - Feb 06 2011 :  17:11:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for your posts

I am going to be sailing in the LI Sound mostly in the begining would like to thing that I could go to Block ISland or MV within a year. what sort of instruments should I be looking for on a boat how do i narrow the search that seems to be the biggest issue at this point. there are so many choices out there

Thanks

Brian




Homeport: NY Go to Top of Page

cwms

RO# 7357

Posted - Feb 07 2011 :  12:18:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Google yachtworld. Highlight sailboats, put in your size and price parameters and the area you are willing to travel to and see what pops up.
I'll probably get flamed for this, google sailnet. Boatered is a great web site for power boaters, not so much for sailboaters. Sailnet will have 100 sailors for every 1 here.



Homeport: VA Go to Top of Page

Seadaddler

RO# 31074

Posted - Dec 16 2011 :  09:11:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I sailed my Hunter 290 from Va. to LI in 2001 and now have a hunter 36 that I sailed all over Ct. and LI and out to Block Island a few times and in 2007 sailed from Montauk to east coast of Fl all ocean and than east coast of Fl around keys and up to Punta Gorda and since also sailed back to Keys and Dry tortugas and also up to tarpoon Springs and back to Punta Gorda,whee i sail on west coast of Fl arer many Hunters that sail all over.
What ever boat maybe for what you want should be 30 but it should be in good condition and not need too much repair and than add your own electronics.
Nick



Homeport: FL Go to Top of Page

saltysam

RO# 26



Posted - Dec 18 2011 :  19:31:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
AS you can see there are many ways to handle this small problem :-)

First, get into some active sailing group where you can be welcomed and helped through the inbitial issues. "Learn the ropes". After a while try to get invited aboard some of your new friends' boats for an afternoon or evening sail. You'll learn fast. Lottsa boats to select from. Go and Have Fun!
I agree with those who say a small boat is more difficult to work with than one in the 27-32 ft range. Deck space helps and really makes for a more safe environment.



Cheers!
Bill

Homeport: New River, Ft Lauderdale Go to Top of Page

stmbtwle

RO# 7934

Posted - Dec 18 2011 :  19:48:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hmmm this thread is over a year old.

Irish1 do you have any updates????


Willie: Look Ma no paddle!

Homeport: Tampa Bay, FL Go to Top of Page

rtribble

RO# 15208



Posted - Dec 19 2011 :  13:09:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Are things realy so slow that we need to resurrect old threads just to have something to do?
However an update request would be appropriate.



Homeport: Beaver Lake Arkansas Go to Top of Page

Bliss

RO# 2743

Posted - Dec 19 2011 :  15:10:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I left sailing in 1999. Last boat was a Cat 400 with all the goodys including MarineAir. The Admiral loved it. I had a Paceship PY 23, PY26 and Beneteau 35s5 as well. For far less than $40,000 a used PY26 with a diesel Yanmar or BMW should not be hard to find. Very similiar to the O'Days of that era as they were designed by Hunt. If you are working for a living be realistic about cruising. Most find enjoyment in day sailing with friends and very rarely go far from their home marina. The top speed of a displacement hull in knots - pretty much anything with a fixed keel is 1.34 x the square root of the waterline. I have spent many a day covering 60 to 80 miles a day and their was never much energy left at the end of the day for frivolity. If I went back to sailing at my now advanced age I would look hard at something that comfortably broadreached a couple of miles from the marina. Four miles this way, turn 180 degrees four miles that way "Please pass the cheese". Back to the dock and a beer or two with my new friends. I will now show my age. I like the Cape Dorys, Tartan 30 not 300, Tartan 34, Pearson Ensigns,Islander 36 -----


Edited by - Bliss on Feb 08 2012 07:42:29

Homeport: Reef Point Racine, WI Go to Top of Page

stmbtwle

RO# 7934

Posted - Dec 19 2011 :  15:26:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think I gave up sailing in about 1993 or so, shortly after I bought my first houseboat. It wasn't any faster than the sailboat, but it was more comfortable and a LOT less work!

Willie: Look Ma no paddle!

Homeport: Tampa Bay, FL Go to Top of Page

saltysam

RO# 26



Posted - Jan 31 2012 :  20:40:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Maybe Irish has become attracted to New York State ice boating...


Cheers!
Bill

Edited by - saltysam on Feb 07 2012 19:34:22

Homeport: New River, Ft Lauderdale Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic: DUTCH TEENAGER COMPLETES WORLD TRIP Topic Next Topic: A big, badwater, what if?  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Jump To:
BoaterEd © BoaterEd Go To Top Of Page
This page took 0.48 seconds to load
Forum Guidelines and Privacy Notice

    

Boatered.com