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 Marine Detailing & Fabrication
 Buffing and Waxing
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Author Previous Topic: Mildew Topic Next Topic: cleaning parts after small water leaks  

timjet

RO# 32060

Posted - Jul 21 2012 :  17:34:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After reading Mike Ryans sticky on buffing I have a few question and comments.
My '98 Carver has never been waxed and least not in the last several years and the gel coat is heavily oxidized. My plan is to use my Craftsman buffer with a Schlegel #1 Buff wool pad and 3m Super Duty Compound to start. I estimate it will take 3 application of the super duty compound to get a shine.
Next I will use 3M Marine Rubbing Compound which should take one application using the Schlegel #1 pad.
Next up is 3M Finess-It glaze again applied with the Schlegel pad. However I'm not sure the Schlegel #1 pad is the correct one at this step.
Lastly I'll use a wax and I'm open to suggestions.

One final question, what is the best way to clean the wool pad?

Thanks for any help.
Tim
Carver 355 ACMY
Cummins 6BT 5.9 M3 Diesels
Tampa, FL

Homeport: FL

Rick D

RO# 32381



Posted - Jul 21 2012 :  18:16:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I used different products and different procedure but when it came time to clean the pad because it was caked, I used the edge of a tongue depressor against the pad a moderate speed. It pulls a lot of the caked stuff off and the pad springs back to life.

My boat when I bought it had no shine the hull sides were chaulky. I cleaned it and used Buff Magic followed by Pro Polish... although it was the Buff Magic that brought it back looking like new... simply amazing. The yard I kept it in at the time stopped to ask me what I had used because it was night and day and they only use 3M products. Stuff works... but I've heard glowing reviews about the 3M stuff as well.

--Rick


1997 Larson Cabrio 310

Edited by - Rick D on Jul 21 2012 18:16:38

Homeport: Guilford, CT Go to Top of Page

timjet

RO# 32060

Posted - Jul 22 2012 :  06:29:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Rick for the info and your experience. I'm certainly open to suggestions and that's why I started this post. I plan on doing the top sides and then when I haul the boat in a year or so the hull.
When you used Buff Magic was more than one application required? The reason I mentioned 3 applications in my previous post is that's what it took for a detailer to show me what he could do and what the gel coat could look like if I hired him. I don't know what he used. Did you use a wool pad to apply Buff Magic and the same wool pad to remove it?

Tim


Tim
Carver 355 ACMY
Cummins 6BT 5.9 M3 Diesels
Tampa, FL

Homeport: FL Go to Top of Page

Gregory S

RO# 2620



Posted - Jul 22 2012 :  13:08:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I put Buff Magic on with a wool pad, medium speed and take it off by hand with a terry cloth towel. I do 2 to foot sections at a time. I avoid wax after the polish like the plague. It yellows the gel coat and attracts dirt when the sun beats down on it. I only use polymers like pro Polish or Rejex.


Homeport: Norfolk, Va Go to Top of Page

Stephen

RO# 14

Posted - Jul 22 2012 :  19:30:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I use terry cloth covers. When they load up, I just switch them inside out. I have 5 that I use each year and don't bother trying to clean them up on-site. I do throw them in the washer a couple of times with extra soap and hot water to clean them. BTW, I've used the heavily oxidized 3M cleaner and I found it too thick. You might want to bring an old sprayer filled with water to cut the paste if you need to.


Homeport: Matts Landing, NJ Go to Top of Page

Rick D

RO# 32381



Posted - Jul 22 2012 :  20:32:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by timjet


When you used Buff Magic was more than one application required? ..... Did you use a wool pad to apply Buff Magic and the same wool pad to remove it?

Tim



No. Just one pass with buff magic brought my boat back very nicely. I used a nice clean cloth (by hand) to remove it and the results were nothing less than amazing. Followed up with Pro Polish, but to be honest, the Pro Polish didn't make the finish look any nicer so I'm assuming it protects the newly brought out gel coat. Anyway, a big part of the equation I believe is the electric polisher you use. I think the polisher you use on your car would not work well on a boat with heavy oxidation.

You need to use something more heavy duty... like the one I bought from Harbor Freight:

http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/polishers/7-inch-variable-speed-polisher-sander-92623.html

Gets a bit heavy when doing the side of your boat... especially working overhead... but the combo of rotating polisher (not orbital) with Buff Magic worked very well.

If you buy one of these rotating polishers DON"T use it on your car, it will most likely blister the paint.

--Rick

Edit - You know, someone at your marina must have a dab of buff magic they will let you try (on a true rotary polisher) and see what kind of results you get. Stuff's expensive... but if you can cut out a step (Buff Magic then Polish) it's worth it IMO.


1997 Larson Cabrio 310

Edited by - Rick D on Jul 22 2012 20:38:08

Homeport: Guilford, CT Go to Top of Page

Rick D

RO# 32381



Posted - Jul 22 2012 :  20:42:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I second both what Gregory S and Stephen said... I worked on area's no larger than 3 to 4 feet. And I as well bought 6 or 7 of the pads so I don't waste my time on site cleaning. Your boat is 35 ft? It will cake up well before you are done with your first coat... you may want to buy a bunch of pads.

--Rick


1997 Larson Cabrio 310

Homeport: Guilford, CT Go to Top of Page

JVM225

RO# 28365

Posted - Jul 22 2012 :  21:24:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Npt sure about the specs on your Craftsmn machine. But I can tell you that if it's a random orbital you will be killing yourself for very little, if any, return.
You need to use a good rotary machine on the gel coat.
I use a Makita 9227 and wool pads on my boat. It brings the 25 year old Gel Coat to a nice level of shine.


2002 Sea Ray 410 Sundancer
95 Eastern 22'
05 Maxum 18' Bowrider
C6 Corvette Convertible
68 GTO


Homeport: Farmingdale NY Go to Top of Page

Pa Mikee

RO# 32785

Posted - Jul 22 2012 :  21:28:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sometimes just buffing the gelcoat is a waste of time and the first step should be wet sanding. Buffing will certainly improve the appearance. Gelcoat when left to get chalky is more than on the surface. It tends to get pitted. Trying to buff it will load up the pad very quickly. You'll spend as much time cleaning pads as you will be buffing.


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cmariner32

RO# 7269

Posted - Jul 22 2012 :  21:46:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
+1 on what Mikee said. My new-to-me Carver Santego was heavily oxidized. I first wet sanded, then compounded with 3M heavy duty compound, buff magic and finally pro polish. Did an amazing job of rejuvenating the finish and 5 months into the Florida season....holding up very well. I am a Buff Magic and Pro Polish believer.

The only thing that works on an old boat.....is the Owner.

Homeport: Clearwater/St. Pete Florida Go to Top of Page

Robyns Nest

RO# 4846

Posted - Jul 23 2012 :  18:22:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
+2 on what Mikee says.

Test with some wet sand paper. Start with 600 then 800, then 1000, then buff Magic.


__________________________________________________
2003 56 Post Convertible 2x1300HP V12 MAN
2018 30' Sea Hunt Gamefish 2x300HP Yamahas
--------------------------------------------------------
"The future ain't what is used to be."
- Yogi Berra

Homeport: Monmouth Beach NJ Go to Top of Page

Pa Mikee

RO# 32785

Posted - Jul 23 2012 :  20:48:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If it is heavily oxidized, tape of a small area and wet sand it. Then buff out that area and an adjectent area. Look at both areas when the sun is low in the sky. That should give a good indication as to what your approach should be. You have to look at the gelcaoat from an angle (essentially looking down the length of the boat) and not looking at it by standing straight in front of it. My boat, 1992, sat a few years and had some oxidation. I did a very slight wet sand, 1500 sand paper, above the rub rails and have buffed the boat every year for the past 4 years. I always get compliments on the boat. I just had some ask me if it was a 2006. While I thought the gelcoat below the rub rail was in great condition, I can now notice some cloudeness to it; white hull. I felt that the sides were in good condition but after buffing over the years I realized it wasn't. The cloudeness is due to the fact that much of the gelcoat is good/shiney and some areas are not as good. At this point I'm not concerned about it. With a couple more buffings it should go away. Above the rub rail is a differnt story. I still can maintain a shine during the season and it does not get chalky. However, it does not get the glossy look like a new boat. It may evetually come around.




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