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 Radio check, radio check
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HOGAN

RO# 3813



Posted - Jun 04 2013 :  08:33:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Instead of clogging up the airwaves, and hoping someone responds, you can use the Sea Tow automated radio check, which allows YOU to hear your own transmission - not someone else's interpretation of how it sounds. In the Haverstraw Bay area, use channel 24 - which will connect you to the antenna in Ossining.

http://www.seatow.com/boating-safety/automated-radio-checks
_________________________


1999 Trojan 440 Express
2005 Scout 175 Sportfish

MMSI# 338049724




Surly to bed, surly to rise...

Homeport: Haverstraw Marina, Haverstraw, NY

Audrey II

RO# 30499



Posted - Jun 04 2013 :  09:05:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very cool I keep meaning to try this out!

Dave

“Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time.” – T.S. Elliotcommon.
-----------------------------------------------------------

1996 440 Trojan Express

Homeport: Haverstraw, NY Go to Top of Page

mdoherty

RO# 12220



Posted - Jun 04 2013 :  13:25:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In the Annapolis area some clown has figured out he can extend his range by using the repeater to call his buddies and have a conversation over the repeater.

Mike

Homeport: Leesburg VA Go to Top of Page

rommer

RO# 12280



Posted - Jun 04 2013 :  13:37:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sea Tow in Sandy Hook uses channel 27. I was pleasantly surprised that I could reach from my marina which is roughly 17 miles.




Boats, yup, 5 of em...
WLC - We love Champlin's!

Homeport: Liberty Landing Marina, NJ Go to Top of Page

pocket change

RO# 31212



Posted - Jun 04 2013 :  20:20:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

These radio checks are wherever Sea Tow is. In Key Largo Fl it's ch 27. 24, 25, 26, 27,& 28 used to be the marine operator channels but with the advent of cell phones they are no longer needed.



Homeport: stony point bay marina ny Go to Top of Page

Audrey II

RO# 30499



Posted - Jun 04 2013 :  20:42:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rommer

Sea Tow in Sandy Hook uses channel 27. I was pleasantly surprised that I could reach from my marina which is roughly 17 miles.





17 miles sounds about right how clear was it? I was always taught it's a mile a watt or there about without interference. So 25 miles should be the outer limits, But this was what I remember from my classes as a teenager and that was a long time ago! I don't think radio signal has changed much in this time other the digital transmission.


Dave

“Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time.” – T.S. Elliotcommon.
-----------------------------------------------------------

1996 440 Trojan Express

Homeport: Haverstraw, NY Go to Top of Page

HOGAN

RO# 3813



Posted - Jun 04 2013 :  21:19:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's line of sight, not wattage that determines how far the signal goes. The higher the antenna, the farther the signal.

_________________________


1999 Trojan 440 Express
2005 Scout 175 Sportfish

MMSI# 338049724




Surly to bed, surly to rise...

Homeport: Haverstraw Marina, Haverstraw, NY Go to Top of Page

mdoherty

RO# 12220



Posted - Jun 04 2013 :  21:35:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Mars orbiter transmits 250 million miles with 100 watts.

Mike

Homeport: Leesburg VA Go to Top of Page

Audrey II

RO# 30499



Posted - Jun 04 2013 :  22:25:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They must have a really tall antenna on mars!

If wattage isn't a factor then why do have have a low power for close communication while using the same antenna? Of coarse line of sight will extend the range Hense the statement "it's a mile a watt or there about without interference" The interference I was referring to is structural and environmental such as buildings mountains or even trees. Naturally different frequencies have different range limitation based on the wave length.

I don't believe they are talking to Mars using a marine VHF radio! no matter how tall the antenna.

Interesting link

http://www.frugal-mariner.com/Ranges.html

"How far can I expect to be heard with my VHF radio? Easy; about 10 to 25 miles. What affects the range? Heights of the antennas (both transmit and receive) and the terrain between the two. These are the easy answers. But easy answers are often incorrect answers."

25 mile max which is a mile per watt obviously there are a number of factors when it comes to range. Keep in mind I was just repeating something I was taught in some electronics class 30+ years ago.


Dave

“Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time.” – T.S. Elliotcommon.
-----------------------------------------------------------

1996 440 Trojan Express

Homeport: Haverstraw, NY Go to Top of Page

rommer

RO# 12280



Posted - Jun 04 2013 :  22:35:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by HOGAN

It's line of sight, not wattage that determines how far the signal goes. The higher the antenna, the farther the signal.



Which is why one can seemingly always here the CG on the radio but rarely hear the party they are talking to. The CG has very tall towers. They are limited to the same wattage as everyone else.




Boats, yup, 5 of em...
WLC - We love Champlin's!

Homeport: Liberty Landing Marina, NJ Go to Top of Page

Caryl-d

RO# 7966

Posted - Jun 05 2013 :  05:08:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Its actually both. Wattage is how strong the signal is and the terrain effects how the signal is recieved. The frequency used is also a factor. The CB radio which is only 4 watts AM and transmits at 27 MZ with perfect conditions can talk thousands of miles due to bouncing off the atmosphere. When I was in Europe we talked back to US often. Conditions where perfect and we were in a cycle they called skip that made this possible. Also during these events we could not talk 1/2 mile away unless you had a little extra power to help you.

I have often wondered if the coast guard had extra power or if the used different repeaters (stations they retransmit the signal from). There are times you hear the signal strength increase which would make me think they increased the power. Its also possible the switch to a direction antenna which I think they do use to find vessels that don't know where they are.

I could go on forever but I am late for work. Don't have to say that many more times!

End result both wattage and location effect the signal.


Butch
The Gov of "B" Dock

Homeport: SS3@Penny Bridge Marina Stony Point, NY Go to Top of Page

Billylll

RO# 24494

Posted - Jun 05 2013 :  07:54:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
1st deep space communications can't be compared to VHF signals or normal communications. They use a series of receiving stations positioned around the world. They communicate around 2GHz (microwave).

Now as far as the CG they use directional antennas which is why many times you hear them great then a few minutes later you can barely hear them.

VHF which is what mariners use is generally subject to line of site under normal conditions. The CG uses some of the highest commercial towers located along the coast and inland waterways. Their antennas are generally 300 to 1000 feet in the air. They have multiple antennas that can be configured as a directional array. They also use digital lines to transport the control & audio from their stations to the transmitting towers. CG stations rarely have these large towers at their post.
VHF is subject to Tropo or Tropospheric ducting. This can extend normal 10 to 25 mile communications to 100's of miles. Anyone with an AIS receiver can see this during early morning and late evening when there are stacked high pressure systems. The gradients produce a tunnel for VHF signals to travel great distances.
I have sat many a morning in Southern NJ and heard CG Charleston SC, or Miami Beach. It's very common to hear USCG Long Island Sound to Norfolk, Va from south Jersey. I have watched my AIS screen populate with 30 to 50 vessels from Long Island Sound to Norfolk, VA. This is not E-skip which is what happens on CB radio (27MHz) but Tropo ducting. E-Skip rarely happens above 54MHz however I have seen E-skip reach a MUF (maximum usable frequency) of 222MHz.
So it's possible that the VHF marine band could have E-skip but it would be rare and probably only happen for short durations (less than a hour) and perhaps happen a few times a year. It's much more common for the marine VHF band to have Tropo ducting.
Bill



Bill Lentz
Little Egg, N.J.

Edited by - Billylll on Jun 05 2013 07:56:58

Homeport: Tuckerton, N.J. Go to Top of Page

Audrey II

RO# 30499



Posted - Jun 09 2013 :  09:05:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I finally tried this out and it works great!

Dave

“Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time.” – T.S. Elliotcommon.
-----------------------------------------------------------

1996 440 Trojan Express

Homeport: Haverstraw, NY Go to Top of Page

Billylll

RO# 24494

Posted - Jun 09 2013 :  09:40:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Butch there is a saying when it comes to ham radio that hold true for the CG transmitter's it's location, location and then it's location! It's all about HAAT height above average terrain. They are also licensed to use more then 25 watts.
Bill


Bill Lentz
Little Egg, N.J.

Homeport: Tuckerton, N.J. Go to Top of Page

BoatCrazy

RO# 30843



Posted - Jun 09 2013 :  20:14:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks interesting.

Personally, when I do a radio check, I often ask for a location for the captain that responds. I am on 68 doing this, not 16. Thats the one downfall of this from seatow. Maybe it does it, and I missed it...



1988 StarCraft Bluewater 240 250hp Yamaha OX66

Homeport: Freeport NY Go to Top of Page

mdoherty

RO# 12220



Posted - Jun 09 2013 :  20:30:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It broadcasts their location and you hear your own voice back to gauge quality, voice level etc.

Mike

Homeport: Leesburg VA Go to Top of Page

BoatCrazy

RO# 30843



Posted - Jun 09 2013 :  21:05:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sounds good. When I get around to getting the boat in, ill give it a shot.

Thanks!



1988 StarCraft Bluewater 240 250hp Yamaha OX66

Homeport: Freeport NY Go to Top of Page

Audrey II

RO# 30499



Posted - Jun 10 2013 :  07:12:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BoatCrazy

Sounds good. When I get around to getting the boat in, ill give it a shot.

Thanks!





Make sure you wait for a winding day so you can practice docking:)


Dave

“Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time.” – T.S. Elliotcommon.
-----------------------------------------------------------

1996 440 Trojan Express

Homeport: Haverstraw, NY Go to Top of Page

BoatCrazy

RO# 30843



Posted - Jun 10 2013 :  09:25:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
No need to practice docking a 17ft center console.

But again, when I had the bigger boat I never kept it in a marina, it was behind my house. When I did go out and practice docking, it was in an empty marina. So when it came time to dock behind the house, I had 120ft of bulkhead, no boats near me, which didnt matter.

Dont knock it till you try it Dave. If you can dock your boat in the wind, you can dock your boat at any point. Knowing how your boat is going to respond and react in a windy situation is key for close quarter docking. I rather know what I can and cannot do, what the limits of the boat are, ahead of time, instead of ending up in that situation not knowing...

It may sound funny, but again, dont knock it till you try it.



1988 StarCraft Bluewater 240 250hp Yamaha OX66

Homeport: Freeport NY Go to Top of Page

Audrey II

RO# 30499



Posted - Jun 10 2013 :  19:03:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have docked my boat in the wind many times but not because I choose to go end in the wind, I have been caught in a surprise storm and yes I did just fine but I would never knowingly go out just to practice in the wind!

I glad to hear you weren't in busy marina when you practiced this make a lot more sense to me now!


Dave

“Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time.” – T.S. Elliotcommon.
-----------------------------------------------------------

1996 440 Trojan Express

Homeport: Haverstraw, NY Go to Top of Page

Delivering Happiness

RO# 33144



Posted - Jun 10 2013 :  19:05:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For some reason there is wind in my slip 24/7!!

____________________
Allen
1998 Trojan 440 Express
____________________
GeeVeeBee

Homeport: Haverstraw, NY Go to Top of Page

BoatCrazy

RO# 30843



Posted - Jun 10 2013 :  19:19:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"I glad to hear you weren't in busy marina when you practiced this make a lot more sense to me now!'

I might be young and dumb, but I am not that dumb lol




1988 StarCraft Bluewater 240 250hp Yamaha OX66

Homeport: Freeport NY Go to Top of Page

Billylll

RO# 24494

Posted - Jun 10 2013 :  20:12:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Delivering Happiness

For some reason there is wind in my slip 24/7!!


Well it's pretty much the same here there is almost always wind most of the time out of the South which makes me look like an expert at docking. When it's a Northeast wind well that pushes me away from the dock and into the marsh. Hogan, Walter V and Dave R have seen my docking arrangement I have to spin the boat 180 degrees and my bow pulpit actually hangs over marsh. No real room for error. Speaking of storms Harlan got to watch me spin it in 60mph plus gusting winds, to this day I'm not sure how I did it.
Bill


Bill Lentz
Little Egg, N.J.

Homeport: Tuckerton, N.J. Go to Top of Page

rommer

RO# 12280



Posted - Jun 10 2013 :  21:16:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Billylll

Harlan got to watch me spin it in 60mph plus gusting winds, to this day I'm not sure how I did it.
Bill



Skill!




Boats, yup, 5 of em...
WLC - We love Champlin's!

Homeport: Liberty Landing Marina, NJ Go to Top of Page

Billylll

RO# 24494

Posted - Jun 10 2013 :  21:38:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rommer

quote:
Originally posted by Billylll

Harlan got to watch me spin it in 60mph plus gusting winds, to this day I'm not sure how I did it.
Bill



Skill!



And that day a lot of luck.


Bill Lentz
Little Egg, N.J.

Homeport: Tuckerton, N.J. Go to Top of Page
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