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 steel house boat in water for winter
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lauriee15

RO# 9947

Posted - Dec 15 2016 :  18:13:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi I have a question about leaving a 36' steel house boat in the water over the winter to freeze. My marine owner is a little bit of a jerk...( when I say little bit I mean big jerk !!!). says he doesn't have room to take me out this year so he's leaving my steel house boat in the water which will freeze ... I am in Maryland Chesapeake Bay ...I told him the ice will crush my boat and he told me that it will be fine..??!!.. can anyone give me some advice .... and I do not have a bubbler or cannot afford one that's why I want to be taken out ..

Thanks... Laurie

Homeport:

Michael Clemensen

RO# 2006



Posted - Dec 15 2016 :  18:28:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What are the Marina's written rules and what does your contract state?.


Homeport: Winthrop Harbor, Illinois Go to Top of Page

lauriee15

RO# 9947

Posted - Dec 15 2016 :  20:10:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's a dump of a Marina, no contract ...my main question is will my boat be OK if it is frozen and the water over the winter ...


Homeport: Go to Top of Page

cwms

RO# 7357

Posted - Dec 15 2016 :  20:49:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Could stuff happen? Yes. But chances are very good your boat will be fine. I remember many years ago, before de-icers, our marina had 8-9 inches of ice. Many boats were in it and probably more than half were wood. To the best of my knowledge, no boats suffered any damage. By the way, I'm on the lower Potomac.


Homeport: VA Go to Top of Page

Kevdon22

RO# 32964

Posted - Dec 15 2016 :  21:48:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I had a wooden boat, I used to leave it in the water in the Marina without ice eaters all the time.
Several considerations: The boat should not have significant leaks, Is it necessary to run the bilge bump, then anti freeze should be used at the pump (not ethylene glycol).
The boat was tied in a lagoon off the bay, no ice flow which could push the boat around.
There were quite a few boats moored in adjoining slips so that the ice was broken up into sections between each boat. Some boaters would break up the ice between the boats, but I don't think that was necessary.
Is there someone in the marina to check things out and take action if necessary?
What does your insurance say?


Kevdon
Forked River,
Barnegat Bay
NJ

Homeport: Forked River, NJ Go to Top of Page

lauriee15

RO# 9947

Posted - Dec 15 2016 :  22:16:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you so much for your reply ...I feel a lot better now ...since I'm already in the water I guess I'll be ready for spring early ha ha


Homeport: Go to Top of Page

lauriee15

RO# 9947

Posted - Dec 15 2016 :  22:18:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes someone happens to be a live aboard three boats down and said he will keep an eye on it for me ...


Homeport: Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Dec 15 2016 :  23:45:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Where? No informed opinion is valid without knowing WHERE.

My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

Good Grief

RO# 13137



Posted - Dec 16 2016 :  07:50:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
IF you are on the Chesapeake in an area known for hard freezes, then you have some other considerations besides the hull. Your engines/genset are seawater cooled (either raw or FWC), as such your engine room will need heat to prevent freezing and damage to the engines (in fact, even with ice eaters interior seawater systems could freeze w/o heat). Same w/ freshwater systems not properly winterized. So you'll need to ensure the boat has electric ALL WINTER LONG - may be worth the investment in an notification system for loss of power.

hope this helps.


-Gene
If you're not a liberal at 20, you don't have a heart. If you're not a conservative at 40, you don't have a brain - Winston Churchill

Homeport: Viking Boat Yard, Verplank NY Go to Top of Page

Audrey II

RO# 30499



Posted - Dec 16 2016 :  08:04:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I would assume the boat will be winterized same as if it were on land so the motors should be fine! I'm also assuming being there is a live aboard a few boats down that the is power at the docks when I won't not be concerned as long as the marina is going to install an ice eater. Without the ice eater I would find another place to keep my boat!

Dave

“Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time.” – T.S. Elliotcommon.
-----------------------------------------------------------

1996 440 Trojan Express

Homeport: Haverstraw, NY Go to Top of Page

New2Me34C

RO# 25024

Posted - Dec 16 2016 :  08:08:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Can't you bring the boat to another marina that can haul and store it out of the water?

"Seas the Moment II"
2003 Silverton 35C
Buzzards Bay, MA

Homeport: MA Go to Top of Page

cwms

RO# 7357

Posted - Dec 16 2016 :  09:57:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Good Grief

IF you are on the Chesapeake in an area known for hard freezes, then you have some other considerations besides the hull. Your engines/genset are seawater cooled (either raw or FWC), as such your engine room will need heat to prevent freezing and damage to the engines (in fact, even with ice eaters interior seawater systems could freeze w/o heat). Same w/ freshwater systems not properly winterized. So you'll need to ensure the boat has electric ALL WINTER LONG - may be worth the investment in an notification system for loss of power.

hope this helps.



Any prudent boat owner will winterize all systems and not depend on heaters.



Homeport: VA Go to Top of Page

Ironworks

RO# 20174



Posted - Dec 16 2016 :  12:43:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I would plug the exhaust so water cant enter there if the ice gets flooded with water while the boat is frozen in place.

44' Viking ACMY Diesel
28 ft Omega 454 Gas IB

Homeport: Toledo Ohio. Go to Top of Page

mixman

RO# 25362



Posted - Dec 16 2016 :  20:52:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cwms
Any prudent boat owner will winterize all systems and not depend on heaters.



I guess I'm not "prudent" but I rely on heaters (Xtreme brand USCG approved engine room heaters). I've been doing this for nearly 10 years off the Chesapeake with no issues. The low last night was 10F and my most exposed area stayed in the upper 30s.


--Kurt

20mph cruise at 5-7gph. Two hulls are better than one!
This is an ethanol-free boat.

Homeport: Chesapeake Bay Go to Top of Page

mixman

RO# 25362



Posted - Dec 16 2016 :  21:35:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Laurie, as NC asked, exactly where are you on/off the Chesapeake? There's quite a difference in winter temps depending on location. Steel hulls hold up very well in ice (http://www.allatsea.net/chilling-alvah), but be sure your engines and systems are winterized if not heated. If you're close to me (Baltimore area) I can loan you a deicer for this winter as I have an extra currently. However, I'd be very surprised that a marina wouldn't protect their piers from heavy ice.

--Kurt

20mph cruise at 5-7gph. Two hulls are better than one!
This is an ethanol-free boat.

Homeport: Chesapeake Bay Go to Top of Page

boatbum

RO# 36

Posted - Dec 17 2016 :  07:37:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Someone will keep an eye on it for me".

Famous last words.




Homeport: Go to Top of Page

32carv

RO# 24150



Posted - Dec 17 2016 :  08:10:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Right along with "hold my beer, I'm going to show you something cool"
Jim



Homeport: Sacandaga Lake Go to Top of Page

Audrey II

RO# 30499



Posted - Dec 17 2016 :  08:40:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Question for those who count on heaters, what happens it there is a power outage for a few days? You will be hard pressed to find the supplies to winterize your boat at the last second assuming have time or ability to even get to it.

Dave

“Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time.” – T.S. Elliotcommon.
-----------------------------------------------------------

1996 440 Trojan Express

Homeport: Haverstraw, NY Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Dec 17 2016 :  08:55:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have seen pilings be jacked up out of the bottom by water freezing to them with repeated freezing and tide

Bruce



Edited by - pdecat on Dec 17 2016 08:56:18

Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

cwms

RO# 7357

Posted - Dec 17 2016 :  18:32:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mixman

quote:
Originally posted by cwms
Any prudent boat owner will winterize all systems and not depend on heaters.



I guess I'm not "prudent" but I rely on heaters (Xtreme brand USCG approved engine room heaters). I've been doing this for nearly 10 years off the Chesapeake with no issues. The low last night was 10F and my most exposed area stayed in the upper 30s.



Some years ago, we had a bad ice storm right around New Years. We lost power for a week and temps rarely got above freezing and I live in a heavily populated area...Surburban Richmond. I'm sure that the very rural area where we keep or boat, lower Potomac, they didn't fare any better.



Edited by - cwms on Dec 17 2016 18:33:44

Homeport: VA Go to Top of Page

mixman

RO# 25362



Posted - Dec 17 2016 :  21:57:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If a boat is in the water in the Chesapeake there is some warmth from the water. I've been through a 48-hour power outage via a sleet storm a few years ago when highs were only in the single digits (F) and the boat survived just fine. In the MD (and south) areas the real threat is to boats that are out of the water. Cold air below the boat is much worse than warmer water under it. Note: I'm a product tester for Xtreme Heaters. 10 years and so far, so good! I'll be installing Xtreme Heaters on my Gulfstar "Trawler" as soon as I launch it.

--Kurt

20mph cruise at 5-7gph. Two hulls are better than one!
This is an ethanol-free boat.

Homeport: Chesapeake Bay Go to Top of Page

cwms

RO# 7357

Posted - Dec 17 2016 :  22:28:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I also remember some years ago going to our marina and the creek it is in had 9 inches of ice. This was in the days before de-icers. I do understand how water stays warmer than air, but I strongly believe no non-winterized boats would have made it thru that cold spell without mechanical damage. I'm guessing Baltimore, being about 100 miles further north was probably a degree or two colder.

A few years ago, one of my marina neighbors decided to go the heater route instead of winterizing. No problems, all went well. In the spring, I just happened to be standing on the dock behind his boat when he fired up his engines for the first time. What I saw coming out of his exhaust would make anyone sick and be convincing evidence that wInterizing engine blocks with anti-freeze is the only way to go. What came out of the exhaust looked like mud and took a good minute before it cleared up to look like sea water. It was nasty to say the least. My engines when fired up after months of not running had perfectly clear water/AF.



Homeport: VA Go to Top of Page

mixman

RO# 25362



Posted - Dec 17 2016 :  22:53:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
RWC or FWC engines? There's a difference. And then there's outboards, which are (in some cases) self-draining.

--Kurt

20mph cruise at 5-7gph. Two hulls are better than one!
This is an ethanol-free boat.

Homeport: Chesapeake Bay Go to Top of Page

cwms

RO# 7357

Posted - Dec 17 2016 :  23:24:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mixman

RWC or FWC engines? There's a difference.



Totally agree. While a FWC engine has much less to freeze, replacing an ice damaged heat exchange ain't cheap.



Homeport: VA Go to Top of Page

Sandy

RO# 1159

Posted - Dec 18 2016 :  01:38:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll throw in, with no offense intended, if you can't afford a bubbler or Ice Eater, owning a houseboat or other boat that size may not be the wisest situation for you.

You might start looking around for old tires or logs to hang all along each side to help relieve ice pressure on the hull.
But additionally , all parts of the engines RW cooling system must be properly winterized, plus the vessel's whole freshwater plumbing system, head , any wash-downs and the like. Plus bilge and bilge pumps including any trap-dips in their discharge hoses.

I read on a houseboat forum steel hulled house boats rust from the inside out so if yours is somewhat older the hull may not resist ice pressure as strongly as a new hull might.

What exactly DO you have for engines and RWC or FWC , and what through hulls are there? And WHERE are you?

Hopefully for you the marina owner does not read this forum .

CWMS- I believe high-mounted heat exchangers on FWC engines are generally pretty safe from freeze damage since the RW side drains down to the W/L. But low-mounted oil and transmission coolers, and fuel coolers and mufflers and low RW hoses and U/W exhaust ports and other hose-associated U/W thru-hulls are certainly vulnerable to freeze damage.



Sandy

Edited by - Sandy on Dec 18 2016 17:18:43

Homeport: The Vineyard Go to Top of Page

lauriee15

RO# 9947

Posted - Dec 19 2016 :  20:40:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well I have a houseboat with an 90 hp outboard motor that doesn't work ..no exhaust ..it's pretty much just a floating condo ( haha) I've had it for 12 years ..it has always been taking out of the water just this year the guy is being a jerk and says he has no time or place to put it ... there is no contract ...it is a dump of a marina ... my real concern was it being in the water without being crushed .. yes after the winters over I most likely will find a new marina but for now I have no choice ..

Thanks for all the replies !!
#128549;Laurie



Homeport: Go to Top of Page

cwms

RO# 7357

Posted - Dec 19 2016 :  21:31:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chances are slim you will have any problems. Boats have been locked up in ice for years without being damaged. Assuming you are in a somewhat small, protected creek without a strong current, no problems.


Homeport: VA Go to Top of Page
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