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GeeBee

RO# 385



Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  09:41:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Early report of 34 people either in the water or on Santa Cruz Island in CA after boat catches fire and they are unaccounted for. Sounds bad. Our own November Charlie is just up the coast, he may have info or is on the scene.

https://fox5sandiego.com/2019/09/02/34-dead-after-boat-fire-near-santa-cruz-island-according-to-officials/
"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Homeport: Lake Lanier, GA

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  11:05:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Reporting is all over the road - some are saying fatalities, others saying unaccounted for and poor search conditions (heavy fog). CNNís report makes it sound like pax were all trapped below decks, crew made it out because the crew cabin wasnít engulfed. Reporting is terrible thus far, though, and itís still a very much active case, so Iíll anxiously wait for better details.

My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  13:52:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is the layout of the boat... 46 berthed crowded into one compartment below deck with only one stair up. There are pictures of the compartment on line. Tight and packed with wooden berths. A death trap. Crew was reportedly sleeping on the main deck.


https://www.truthaquatics.com/conception/


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  14:01:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I saw that too, but this had to have been a certificated subchapter T boat - would have required alternate egress for the COI to have been issued. A berthing diagram from their advertising is hardly enough to draw many assumptions from. I just wonder why the alternate egress was insufficient - my guess, and it is merely a guess based on what Iíve seen in the news - is that whatever started and fueled the fire was efficient enough that it was a mass conflagration almost immediately and obstructed and/or obscured primary and alternate egress before anyone could even react. What I CANíT get my head around is what that was?

My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  14:24:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
On a diesel boat it can only be propane... if it went kaboom Iím the galley the stairs were blocked

I also wonder how many fire extinguishers were required below deck


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

getakey

RO# 32379



Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  15:08:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
there's a pic in this article of the boat just before it sank. Basically burnt everything down to the waterline

https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2019/09/02/dozens-missing-charter-boat-fire-off-ventura-county-coastline-santa-cruz-island/



Homeport: CA Go to Top of Page

Phillbo

RO# 2553

Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  16:08:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How would scuba tanks react in a fire like this one? Boom?


Homeport: Arizona Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  17:51:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Phillbo

How would scuba tanks react in a fire like this one? Boom?



Donít know how hot theyíd have to get to reach a high enough pressure to fail, but metal fragments would be the primary hazard. I donít think 80-100 cubic feet of compressed air is enough to significantly fan the flames, considering theyíd be stowed on an open deck.


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

GeeBee

RO# 385



Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  18:02:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks like the firewall to the engine room held off flames to the ER which makes Pascals propane comment all the more valuable. Note the galley is forward.



"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Homeport: Lake Lanier, GA Go to Top of Page

GeeBee

RO# 385



Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  19:37:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How about NOx?



"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Homeport: Lake Lanier, GA Go to Top of Page

Stephen

RO# 14

Posted - Sep 02 2019 :  21:06:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Those down below probably secumbed to smoke inhalation before the fire reached them. This and two different drownings near me and hurricane Dorian. Not a great Labor Day weekend.


Homeport: Matts Landing, NJ Go to Top of Page

getakey

RO# 32379



Posted - Sep 03 2019 :  20:23:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
there was an escape hatch

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-I0eibYtM9w



Homeport: CA Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Sep 04 2019 :  09:36:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Propane is not allowed on a USCG Inspected vessel. Scuba tanks have a high pressure relief disc that will pop before the tank explodes and tanks hold atmospheric air, not O2. Divers have a lot of little gadgets (lights, cameras, computers, ETC) that are battery powered and need recharging between dives. An overheating Lithium Ion battery in the wrong place, maybe? Do a USCG PSIX search for the "Conception". You can set the start date for the search back to time of new construction. With the number of deaths involved, the Cause and Origin guys will do their best to find the source of the fire. A complete and thorough investigation by the Regulatory Agencies and private interest should highlight the issues. The bunkroom is not fitted with fire sprinklers, just portable fire extinguishers. A roving fire watch by a competent crew would have prevented or greatly altered this outcome. The NTSB will be involved.


Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

getakey

RO# 32379



Posted - Sep 05 2019 :  00:22:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
interesting that the person interviewed said propane was used


Homeport: CA Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Sep 05 2019 :  03:09:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by L. Keith

Propane is not allowed on a USCG Inspected vessel. Scuba tanks have a high pressure relief disc that will pop before the tank explodes and tanks hold atmospheric air, not O2. Divers have a lot of little gadgets (lights, cameras, computers, ETC) that are battery powered and need recharging between dives. An overheating Lithium Ion battery in the wrong place, maybe? Do a USCG PSIX search for the "Conception". You can set the start date for the search back to time of new construction. With the number of deaths involved, the Cause and Origin guys will do their best to find the source of the fire. A complete and thorough investigation by the Regulatory Agencies and private interest should highlight the issues. The bunkroom is not fitted with fire sprinklers, just portable fire extinguishers. A roving fire watch by a competent crew would have prevented or greatly altered this outcome. The NTSB will be involved.



Are you sure on the propane? I honestly donít know - donít deal much with subchapter T stuff. Just canít think of what else could causes mass conflag that fast. Only thing I can think of - and the presence of propane has NOT been confirmed that Iíve read - is a steady leak that went undetected until it reached the LEL. Fire sprinklers Iíve never seen on a small passenger vessel - Iíve also never looked, so Iím certainly not arguing the point. But a roving fire watch I donít think would have made a difference in this one particular case. All points to a sudden and overwhelming mass conflagration. I just canít figure out what could have caused that.


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Sep 05 2019 :  08:52:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If there was propane of any source on board that US Flag, United States Coast Guard Inspected Passenger Vessel, the vessel owner, master and others are going away for a very long time, or this was an intentional act. I have been dealing with USCG Inspected Passenger Vessels for Forty (+) years, propane is not allowed. Now you will see Propane Grills on USCG cutters, but the rules don't apply to the enforcers. Ask your OCMI. A crew member on a roving fire watch, should have entered the bunk room on regular basis during the night. A live person on patrol should be able to smell a small smoldering fire/see smoke, notice lights flickering, ETC. and SOUND THE GENERAL ALARM (required equipment) to wake EVERYONE. When you have 34 souls in your charge, you just can't get by with "Well, that's the way WE have always done it".


Edited by - L. Keith on Sep 05 2019 09:03:13

Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Sep 05 2019 :  09:37:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Reread my original post and read this current story from today's LA Times. https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2019-09-05/what-caused-fire-aboard-the-conception


Edited by - L. Keith on Sep 05 2019 09:45:36

Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

getakey

RO# 32379



Posted - Sep 05 2019 :  11:40:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
if it started in the Galley charging area, I'm surprised it would spread that quickly to block the escape hatch toward the stern


Homeport: CA Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Sep 05 2019 :  13:23:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The vessel designer and original owner theorizes that the fire started in the bunkroom. I'm sure he based that on the photos of the vessel while burning. You can see that the hull sides in way of the bunkroom are in flames and completely burned through. Fire investigation 101 tells you that either the fire started in that area (and had more time to burn) or the area contained more fuel for the fire and received a larger volume of air to feed the fire. This is a wood boat, the wreck, if recovered will tell a lot of the story through burn patterns and what melted and what didn't melt. The materials in the bunkroom should have been fire resistant, but that does not apply to items brought aboard by the passengers, including extra pillows, blankets, bedding, Etc. Lithium Ion batteries can explode with considerable force and spread fire quickly. Some folks take sleep aids to help them sleep, some folks use noise cancelling head sets. The dirty little secret about boat fires in a confined space, is that a smoldering fire can generate enough poison/deadly gases to incapacitate/kill a person, before a standard smoke/CO alarm will sound. The investigation will tell most of the story.


Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Sep 05 2019 :  16:11:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After reading that article I agree that your theory is more plausible.

My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

getakey

RO# 32379



Posted - Sep 05 2019 :  16:16:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
seems as thought the escape hatch may not have been easy to get to and get out

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2019-09-05/ntsb-investigator-probing-boat-fire-taken-aback-by-small-escape-route-for-passengers



Homeport: CA Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 05 2019 :  20:21:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I didnít know propane wasnít allowed on inspected vessels but it is something i never want to have on board. All cooking is electric even the grill on th boat I run although charcoal on my own.

33 pax means at least 66 devices to charge. Figure at least a phone and a GoPro each. Thatís many strips n cords


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

Radioactive

RO# 3238



Posted - Sep 05 2019 :  20:46:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My original thought was hot cooking oil spill ( NO EVIDENCE OF THIS ), but the "charging incident" idea might work as a hypothesis. Esp since I just recently had a LiIon cell short and RUD on my desk. ( 3 watt battery, fully charged, + dead short = big hot mess )



Bill

"No matter where you go, there you are." -- Buckaroo Bonzai
"There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." - Kenneth Grahame

Homeport: MS Gulf Coast Go to Top of Page

GeeBee

RO# 385



Posted - Sep 06 2019 :  10:01:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
High capacity lithium batteries continue to be life threatening. Not to hijack the thread, but I loaned my hangar to a guy from Canada who is the brother of a.fellow owner at the airport. They departed for Osh Kosh in July. Along around Chatanooga, the entire electrical system quit. This airplane was a Glasair homebuilt and the owner elected to use electronic ignition sources for both ignition systems. With the electrical failure the engine quit, he glided down through an overcast he was on top of, broke out, was gliding to an open field, overshot that, tried to put it into a smaller field, crashed, dragged himself from wreckage, airplane consumed by a fire that was started by a LITHIUM ION battery. The FAA is getting ready to certify these things for certified aircraft and I think it is the worst idea in the history of aviation. I have been all over the aviation boards trying to spread the word. The owner of the Glasair is still in the hospital in Nashville.

You need to be very wary of these batteries.





"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Homeport: Lake Lanier, GA Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Sep 06 2019 :  10:37:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
ATF now involved in the investigation. Vessel owner has filed for "Limitation of Liability" action, which is expected. Portable chargers and battery packs appear to be a point of focus. Lack of a roving Fire Watch mentioned. This is a wood boat, but I think the hull was sheathed in fiberglass, which is really rare in an Inspected, multi passenger, over night vessel. Did that cause the fire? I doubt it, but it certainly added to the deadly gasses, once the fire got going. You don't want a fixed CO2 fire suppression system in a bunkroom for obvious reasons, but there are Salt Water Mist Sprinkler Systems that could be used to protect a bunkroom. You do run the risk that the system could be accidentally set off and you end up spraying salt water on your passengers as they sleep and wetting a bunch of expensive gear (but hey it's a dive boat). But I would rather deal with a bunch of pissed off passengers than have to deal with what this vessel owner will be going through. If the vessel's crew did not demonstrate the location and how to use the emergency escape hatch during the vessel's pre-departure brief the crew was, in my opinion, negligent. To protect themselves from criminal prosecution, the crew will say they did a complete brief, but the problem is that no one survived to counter that assertion as Dead Men tell No Tales. The passengers have been described as "having been on the dive boat for several trips and were experienced with the ways of the vessel". That, along with a complacent/poorly trained crew may be the part that killed them all. One thing that is missing from all this, is the concern for pollution in a National Sea Park, in California. The Master may end up serving more time for oiling a few sea birds than for the deaths of his passengers.


Edited by - L. Keith on Sep 06 2019 13:04:04

Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

GeeBee

RO# 385



Posted - Sep 06 2019 :  13:16:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Question Why would ATF be involved other than to lend analysis to accelerants, which I assume the FBI is equally competent and the NTSB is no slouch either.





"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Homeport: Lake Lanier, GA Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Sep 07 2019 :  10:34:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
US Flag Passenger Vessel, US Citizens on US Flag Passenger Vessel, Unknown cause and origin of a fire on US Flag Passenger Vessel, Dead US Citizens on US Flag Passenger Vessel, US Flag Passenger Vessel Operating as a Concessionaire to US Park Service, US Flag Passenger Vessel has fire of unknown cause and origin while in the confines of a US Park Service (partially) owned island, Possible Criminal Charges against vessel crew and vessel owner/operator. I'm sure there are some other reasons but take your pick from the above list. A fatal fire on any boat operating in the US has a very formal protocol that must be followed for the final investigation report to mean anything. The use of an accelerate is one of the easiest conditions to identify in a boat fire, especially on a wood boat. NTSB's role is to investigate and report to Congress what, if any possible Regulations or Laws are needed to prevent future incidents. I don't know if NTSB has arrest powers or if they can pursue criminal charges.


Edited by - L. Keith on Sep 08 2019 09:23:10

Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

getakey

RO# 32379



Posted - Sep 11 2019 :  21:55:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
last body found


Homeport: CA Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Sep 12 2019 :  15:33:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Preliminary NTSB report.

https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Reports/DCA19MM047-preliminary-report.pdf



Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 12 2019 :  15:46:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So the fire started at the aft end of the salon. Also says the crew tried to come in thru a window near the forward end, what about doors? No doors? If the fire was near the aft end, the main stairs would have been clear

Mystery gets deeper


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

L. Keith

RO# 1615

Posted - Sep 12 2019 :  17:21:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nothing in the preliminary report even remotely deals with where the fire originated. One crew member described what he saw when he woke up, he saw fire reaching the height of the pilothouse deck level. There were no doors on the forward section of main deck level house. The windows were to be used as emergency exits, but the release handles are on the inside of the window, not accessible from the outside. No roving fire watch as the crew was asleep. With six crew aboard, the night watch could have been split 6 and 6, then everybody would have been well rested the next day. I hope you operators of Rule Beater Charter Yachts take note, some of these guys are going to end up in a world of $hit and they operated an inspected vessel. The local USCG Office of Marine Inspection will end up with egg on their faces before this is over.


Homeport: N. Gulf of Mexico Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Sep 12 2019 :  21:41:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by L. Keith

Nothing in the preliminary report even remotely deals with where the fire originated. One crew member described what he saw when he woke up, he saw fire reaching the height of the pilothouse deck level. There were no doors on the forward section of main deck level house. The windows were to be used as emergency exits, but the release handles are on the inside of the window, not accessible from the outside. No roving fire watch as the crew was asleep. With six crew aboard, the night watch could have been split 6 and 6, then everybody would have been well rested the next day. I hope you operators of Rule Beater Charter Yachts take note, some of these guys are going to end up in a world of $hit and they operated an inspected vessel. The local USCG Office of Marine Inspection will end up with egg on their faces before this is over.



Iíll readily admit Iíve come around to your opinion on this one. The lithium ion battery thing is the leading theory, and a live roving watch likely may have made a difference. I donít know that OCMI will take a hit on this, though, depending on how the COI is written. I WOULD bet weíre going to see an NVIC from NMC about lithium ion batteries, though.


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 12 2019 :  22:04:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lithium Ion batteries are on every boat... small like GoPro and drones and large as in seabobs and eFoils. Time to reconsider how they re charged

That said in this case earlier information pointed to the charging station being forward near the galley which is not where the fire appeared to have started

How could the USCG sign off on a boat carrying up to 46 overnight pax in a below deck bunk room with only one exit is just plain mind boggling

Poke fun at ďrule beater charter yachtsĒ but EVERY stateroom has a fire extinguisher, CO and Smoke detector and more than one exit... in this case an inspected vessel was clearly deficient to the point that the USCG has to issue an emergency notice ... donít get me wrong.. I have the upmost respect for the USCG but I think itís inspectors dropped the ball there. L


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Sep 12 2019 :  23:20:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by PascalG

Lithium Ion batteries are on every boat... small like GoPro and drones and large as in seabobs and eFoils. Time to reconsider how they re charged

That said in this case earlier information pointed to the charging station being forward near the galley which is not where the fire appeared to have started

How could the USCG sign off on a boat carrying up to 46 overnight pax in a below deck bunk room with only one exit is just plain mind boggling

Poke fun at ďrule beater charter yachtsĒ but EVERY stateroom has a fire extinguisher, CO and Smoke detector and more than one exit... in this case an inspected vessel was clearly deficient to the point that the USCG has to issue an emergency notice ... donít get me wrong.. I have the upmost respect for the USCG but I think itís inspectors dropped the ball there. L



There WAS alternate egress. Iím trying to make sure I limit my comments to whatís been published in the news, but the most recent articles based on the NTSBís initial report (the ďvanillaĒ report with few details) indicate the fire may have originated, or at least been more intense when discovered, in the after end of the salon, where the alternate egress (ďescape hatchĒ) has previously been reported to be.

I also question the arrangements where a mass conflagration blocking the alternate egress blocks primary egress by default. Thatís an odd bit of logic to me, too. Blocked primary is the reason for alternate egress - but if the arrangement is such that primary is definitely blocked when alternate is, that fails the logic test in my mind.


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

GeeBee

RO# 385



Posted - Sep 13 2019 :  06:52:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Actually, any watch, let alone a roving watch would have mad a difference here.



"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Homeport: Lake Lanier, GA Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 13 2019 :  09:53:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Apparently both lead to the same space (main deck) which only had exits aft where the fire was. The crew was tying to open a window from the outside, no door.

Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

getakey

RO# 32379



Posted - Sep 13 2019 :  11:37:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
both exits led into the Galley on the main deck. Have not seen any description of exits from the galley


Homeport: CA Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Sep 13 2019 :  12:40:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by getakey

both exits led into the Galley on the main deck. Have not seen any description of exits from the galley



The report (linked above) states the crew couldnít get to help passengers in thru the doors at the rear of the main deck as that section was engulfed in flames. It also states they tried to open a window in the forward section but were overwhelmed by smoke.

The fact they were trying to open a window indicates there were no doors by the galley. None can be seen on the side in the picture shown in the report

It also raises more questions

- They couldnít open the window and apparently had nothing to smash it. A fire extinguisher would have done the trick. Did they leave the top deck without a fire extinguisher? Or were there none on the flybridge?

- if indeeed there were no doors at the forward end, this is a major flaw both design and inspection. How could there be only one exit, Above the engine room no less

- how could there not be more than one ladder/stairs to access the flybridge? One crew broke a leg jumping...


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Sep 13 2019 :  18:27:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GeeBee

Actually, any watch, let alone a roving watch would have mad a difference here.





I've come around to the same opinion.


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

November Charlie

RO# 824

Posted - Sep 13 2019 :  18:34:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by PascalG

quote:
Originally posted by getakey

both exits led into the Galley on the main deck. Have not seen any description of exits from the galley



The report (linked above) states the crew couldnít get to help passengers in thru the doors at the rear of the main deck as that section was engulfed in flames. It also states they tried to open a window in the forward section but were overwhelmed by smoke.

The fact they were trying to open a window indicates there were no doors by the galley. None can be seen on the side in the picture shown in the report

It also raises more questions

- They couldnít open the window and apparently had nothing to smash it. A fire extinguisher would have done the trick. Did they leave the top deck without a fire extinguisher? Or were there none on the flybridge?

- if indeeed there were no doors at the forward end, this is a major flaw both design and inspection. How could there be only one exit, Above the engine room no less

- how could there not be more than one ladder/stairs to access the flybridge? One crew broke a leg jumping...



I'm not going to pretend to be an expert on 46CFR subchapter T, but if memory serves me a portable fire extinguisher is required at the main control station. I remember having to look that up - the specific requirements for the extinguisher - when I sat for my license ages ago...long enough that I don't remember the details, but I'm pretty sure one is required. I'll send you a PM with further.


My signature line is cooler than your signature line.

Homeport: Northwest Go to Top of Page

Phillbo

RO# 2553

Posted - Sep 14 2019 :  12:03:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This incident will sink the operating company. No Insurance company will carry them going forward....


Homeport: Arizona Go to Top of Page

getakey

RO# 32379



Posted - Sep 14 2019 :  12:14:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
was that a pun?


Homeport: CA Go to Top of Page
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