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AL8156

RO# 24300

Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  21:35:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Curious as to what folks thing about trawler -style boats vs. cruisers. Seems like you get better fuel economy and more space with the trawler, at the expense of speed and (for lack of a better word) style. One thing I'd be interested to know is whether folks view trawlers as more seaworthy/safe in rough seas than cruisers of equivalent length. Thanks in advance-

Homeport: Clinton, CT

Monterey10

RO# 12830

Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  21:49:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's all about fuel and range. If you have the time, the fuel efficient trawlers are a good way to move a large
cruising boat. I wouldn't recommend a trawler for fishing. Fishing requires some speed.



Homeport: Capitola, CA Go to Top of Page

New Salt

RO# 16327

Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  21:49:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AL8156


Curious as to what folks thing about trawler -style boats vs. cruisers.



I am interested in this too (we aren't avid fishermen). Do any of us have a trawler?

Linda R.
.....who had a nice day at the Miami Boat Show and drooled over a Nordic Tug.



Edited by - New Salt on Feb 15 2007 21:51:04

Homeport: South Florida Go to Top of Page

AL8156

RO# 24300

Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  22:06:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, Nordic Tugs are what got me thinking about this, too - specifically a 32 footer.


Homeport: Clinton, CT Go to Top of Page

Greg Schoenberg

RO# 20280

Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  22:13:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by New Salt

quote:
Originally posted by AL8156


Curious as to what folks thing about trawler -style boats vs. cruisers.



I am interested in this too (we aren't avid fishermen). Do any of us have a trawler?

Linda R.
.....who had a nice day at the Miami Boat Show and drooled over a Nordic Tug.



Did you get a chance to look at C-Ranger's 25' foot tug? Seems to me to be the best of both worlds....slow enough but fast enough.




Homeport: Kalama, Washington Go to Top of Page

New Salt

RO# 16327

Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  22:27:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Al8156, the 32 is what we were actually on and drooling over. My only complaint at first look (and try) is that the bed is rather short for 2 adults to sleep on.

Greg, we did see that tug...saw it and thought it was "cute" but didn't go on it as it is quite a bit smaller than we would want.

Linda R.



Homeport: South Florida Go to Top of Page

PascalG

RO# 12212



Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  22:28:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
hi linda... we were drooling at the boat show too.. but over cats at Stricly sail :-) the dark side is calling loud and clear :-)

AL. depends how you define cruiser and which trawler you're looking at. the economy of the trawlers is very appealing as well as the styling; regardless of style (classic,fast trawlers, tugs, ) they look like real boats.

usually, trawlers will handle rough seas better than your typical "cruiser" although again there are exception. some trawlers will roll more for instance but again there are many different kind of trawlers, a word who mean different thing depending on who you ask.


Pascal
1970 Hatteras 53 MY
26' Starfish sloop
12' Westphal Catboat
16' Hobie Cat
13' Sandbarhopper

Homeport: Miami, FL Go to Top of Page

Chesagansett

RO# 9880



Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  22:45:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Keep in mind that if you want the good fuel economy, there is no such thing as a "fast trawler". Yes, there are trawlers than can go "fast" (14-17 Kts, but then they're not being used as trawlers. Then they're being used as a planing hull, or at least as a semi-displacement hull vessel. If you want the good fuel econmony, you need to keep it down to hull speed, which is often about 6-8 kts for trawlers.

Yes, trawlers usually are very seaworthy compared tosimilar sized cruisres. As for "style points", that's subjective.


Glenn
Herndon, VA
Four Winns Sundowner 245
"Going Coastal"

Edited by - Chesagansett on Feb 15 2007 22:47:16

Homeport: Upper Chesapeake Bay / Key Biscayne, FL Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  23:03:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Speed determines the power needed and fuel use not some marketing terminology such as the word trawler. Take any planing MY and run at displacement speeds and the fuel use will be 4-6 times better.
A pair of 400 HP engines dont require you to go fast but do allow it should weather threaten or you have a schedule you want to meet. Diesels produce about 20 hp for an hour on one gallon of fuel. That figure is independent of darn near everything. So buy the boat that fits your needs and slow down if you want to save fuel and speed up if getting there becomes more important than fuel.



Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

potterhead2002

RO# 13090

Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  23:06:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm a trawler man. 30' Island Gypsy Sedan (looks like a Grand Banks 32). Semi-displacement and full displacement boats are generally heavier than cruisers of the same length. They ride IN the water, not ON the water. They are definitely more seaworthy. O.K., they're slow. To me the journey is the fun. Mine is 30 years old. Original diesel engine with 3700 hours (just getting broke in).


Homeport: Friday Harbor, WA Go to Top of Page

Chesagansett

RO# 9880



Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  23:29:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
<<<...A pair of 400 HP engines dont require you to go fast but do allow it should weather threaten or you have a schedule you want to meet. ".....>>

Bruce,
That's true, but smaller diesels running at a more optimum speed can be more efficient than running big diesels slow. Also, with a trawler, you can go with a SINGLE small diesel, and run even more efficient. The sinlge diesel on a planing hull probably won't be enough to plane it.

By the way, I'm not a trawler guy. I like the ability to go fast. I'm just pointing out the pro-trawler argument.
It's not just speeds that defines trawlers. True trawlers have round bilges and no chines, which gives a "softer" ride.


Glenn
Herndon, VA
Four Winns Sundowner 245
"Going Coastal"

Edited by - Chesagansett on Feb 15 2007 23:33:32

Homeport: Upper Chesapeake Bay / Key Biscayne, FL Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 15 2007 :  23:41:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Glenn: not a big difference in fuel use per HP over the power curve. Keep in mind that a 200 hp diesel is frequently has all the same innards as the 400HP model.


Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

Iman

RO# 22808

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  01:18:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They definitely make a boat for whatever type use you intend or whatever style you like. Funny enough, I like the layouts of some trawlers so much that I'll probably get one and use it as a lake boat when really it was designed for waterway/intercostal type use. My favorites are most of the mid 30 feet Mainships. Maybe if I do get me a Mainship type boat, that will encourage me to eventually move it to the waterways and use it was originally intended.


Homeport: Go to Top of Page

Radioactive

RO# 3238



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  01:33:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is the trawler that I have been lusting for. Glen-L "Argossy" is 42 ft, "fast" w/ cruise at 10 kts max 12 kts, reasonable draft and plenty of room in and out.

For my playing area, this is a good vessel. It seems to be suitable for the coastal waters ( up to at least 50 nm out ) and cruising the GoMex and Bahamas.

The plans are for wood, and while I like the wood, I would prefer steel... In any event, this is a "coastal cruising trawler" type ( and is a semi-displacement hull, allowing about 2x 'hull speed' ). The Nordic tug, otoh, is an "ocean cruising trawler" type ( and closer to a true displacement hull ). Different animals.

In general, when you get over something like 200 hp, you are talking "cruiser" rather than trawler type.


Bill

"No matter where you go, there you are." -- Buckaroo Bonzai
"There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." - Kenneth Grahame

Homeport: MS Gulf Coast Go to Top of Page

inaforty

RO# 8815

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  02:18:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like the semi displacement hull much better for cruising. She is happy at 9 knots or 16 knots.She is not a fast boat but I don't stop for fuel that often either.
I would say the a full displacement hull with a full keel (read weight) would be more seaworthy just like a sailboat.
As far as looks go I guess that is a personal thing. Not to offend anyone but I like a boat to look like a boat not a Nike basketball shoe. Different boats for different people.


Regards Barry

Edited by - inaforty on Feb 16 2007 06:42:33

Homeport: New Bedford Go to Top of Page

Dusty Rhoads

RO# 10868



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  06:46:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We have always been faster boaters due to sch., however are having that trawler built as we speak now!! Twin John Deeres at 6gph. vs our twin cummins at 'who knows what?? Ya got to have the time for it, and we are ready to slow down, so the move to Trawler World.
Good to be back on after two days of no power from Ice storm.


Dusty "Moon River"

Edited by - Dusty Rhoads on Feb 16 2007 06:51:22

Homeport: Annapolis, MD Go to Top of Page

Veebyes

RO# 11224

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  07:23:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks like there are a lot of closet trawler people here. My name is Doug & I am one too.
The switch from fuel sucking go fast boat to miserly go slow boat is certainly more common than the other way around. 'Style' is measured by the eye of the beholder. The various trawler styles change little over the decades. The high production cruisers change every few years appealing to those who simply must have what is percieved as the latest & the greatest.

If I want to feel safe crossing open rough water I'd prefer to do it with a displacement or semi displacement hull under me rather than something that was designed to ride at speed on top of the water.

I don't have a trawler. A trawler in the mid 30s plus length is beyond our boating needs & the ability to trailer a couple times a year requirements. We do have a full keeled boat & a single diesel like so many trawlers & we do most of our traveling at displacement speed although the boat is capable of 18kts. We seldom need more than an hour to get to wherever we are going. We don't need speed.

Now, if we were to get a trawler, this would be in the short list of possibilities. http://www.northpacificyachts.com/

I'll take one with a big single & a hydraulic bow thruster please.



Homeport: Bermuda Go to Top of Page

Flatsflyer

RO# 16388

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  07:47:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Been there, done that and now we have a Trawler.
The Trawler gives us space, comfort and economy ffor a fraction of what we would have to spend on "boating" with ax express crusier, or motor yacht. Our CT (Chao Tao) is 35' with twin 90 hp natrals and cruises comfortably at anywhere from 7 to 10 MPH. Two staterooms with 2 heads, a large flybridge, good size salon and sundeck provide for everything we need.

What finally convinced me to consider a trawler was the fact that I would pass sailboats on the ICW and then pull into a marina. A few hours later the same sailboat would pull in, seemed to make they where doing the same distance each day, spending a lot less on fuel and enjoying the process.

We've spend a ton of money in restoring this old trawler, fuel tanks, electronic, canvas, new upolstry, etc. But we know what we've got and 785 miles a day is plenty of distance to cruise on most days. Went down the St. Johns River last summer and we'll be going to the Key's this summer.


John Coffey

Homeport: Palm Coast, Fl. Go to Top of Page

abalmuth

RO# 13885

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  07:51:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Flatsflyer


But we know what we've got and 785 miles a day is plenty of distance to cruise on most days.


I hope this was a typo

what is your fuel burn at the 7-10 MPH?


_
Cruisers 5000 Sedan Sport/CAT 12LTR's -
Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright
until you hear them speak.........

Homeport: Long Island, NY Go to Top of Page

Grady Wahoo

RO# 16408

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  08:48:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm not a salesman but I was reading about the new Camano 41 last night and they seem to have a new twist to the displacement hull:

All Camanos utilise a revolutionary hull form — the KEELFORM® hull. This hull is a combination of a displacement hull and a planing hull, drawing on the strengths of both of these traditional hull styles. Forward, the stem is deep as it would be in a displacement hull. Aft, the bottom flattens out into hard chines just like a planing boat, but with a large keel that would never be found on a planing yacht. This keel, which provides much of the boat’s displacement, is one of the key elements that make the Camano an adept performer at any speed. As the boat accelerates, the keel provides buoyancy that helps keep the transom from digging a hole as the Camano moves quickly onto a plane. The bow lifts ever so slightly as the boat approaches its maximum cruising speed and there is very little bow wave at any speed.

If I had the dough:

http://www.camanomarine.com/articles/C41specSheet.pdf

Note the hydrostatic data listed on the last page!


Mike
1971 35' Bertram Caribe
"Black Bart"

Homeport: .Salem, MA Go to Top of Page

KnottyBuoyz

RO# 20406

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  09:13:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Radioactive

Here is the trawler that I have been lusting for. Glen-L "Argossy" is 42 ft, "fast" w/ cruise at 10 kts max 12 kts, reasonable draft and plenty of room in and out.


Bill, I've got the study plans for the Argosy in Adobe PDF format e-mail me if you want them.

knottybuoyzii at personainternet.com

Rick


Yours Aye!
Rick
"It's not the boat "you built" until you've sworn at it, bled on it, sweated over it, cried beside it and then threatened to haul the POS outside and burn it!"

Homeport: Iroquois, ON Go to Top of Page

KnottyBuoyz

RO# 20406

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  09:14:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Greg Schoenberg
Did you get a chance to look at C-Ranger's 25' foot tug? Seems to me to be the best of both worlds....slow enough but fast enough.

Did you see the pricetag? $110K US base plus options for a 25' trailer trawler? Sheez, things are gettin' expensive!!!!


Yours Aye!
Rick
"It's not the boat "you built" until you've sworn at it, bled on it, sweated over it, cried beside it and then threatened to haul the POS outside and burn it!"

Homeport: Iroquois, ON Go to Top of Page

interj

RO# 11531

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  09:17:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm sure that is a typo.

I make a few long trips every year, Maybe 80-100 miles. With an express you can get there in 3-4 hours. A trawler would be 10-12. I guess this is expected. Do people with trawler not have children?




Homeport: Sayville Go to Top of Page

KnottyBuoyz

RO# 20406

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  09:17:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dusty Rhoads

We have always been faster boaters due to sch., however are having that trawler built as we speak now!! Twin John Deeres at 6gph. vs our twin cummins at 'who knows what?? Ya got to have the time for it, and we are ready to slow down, so the move to Trawler World.
Good to be back on after two days of no power from Ice storm.

Can you post some pics/specs on your project Dusty? We're going down that road (building) next year. Always nice to see/hear about other builders projects.

Rick


Yours Aye!
Rick
"It's not the boat "you built" until you've sworn at it, bled on it, sweated over it, cried beside it and then threatened to haul the POS outside and burn it!"

Homeport: Iroquois, ON Go to Top of Page

inaforty

RO# 8815

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  09:19:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Grady,
This basic design (more or less) that the Camano uses has been used by Novi and Maine boat builders for many years. Some of the boats have round chines and others are hard chined.

Interesting read here about the Cape Island hull which has a rich history in the Canadian Maritime.
http://www.novatrawler.com/35history.html


Regards Barry

Homeport: New Bedford Go to Top of Page

Grady Wahoo

RO# 16408

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  09:41:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Barry, I'll take that dark blue one with the forward tilted pilothouse windows!
I'd like to see some of that at the Maine Boatbuilders show next month!


Mike
1971 35' Bertram Caribe
"Black Bart"

Homeport: .Salem, MA Go to Top of Page

Tlawler

RO# 3272

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  09:44:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Greg Schoenberg

quote:





I am interested in this too (we aren't avid fishermen). Do any of us have a trawler?






I sold my twin 454 gas guzzler for a 46' trawler with a single 143 HP diesel since I'm gearing up for retirement. Sailboats pass me at about 7 knots, but once retired, I don't expect to be in a hurry. With an average fuel burn of 2-3 gallons per hour and a 1000 gallon capacity, I shouldn't have to stop too often for fuel.

I assume that they are seaworthy since a few sisterships have circled the globe. Once I quit the "Penny Factory", I'm hoping to stay put on the weekends and cruise during the week when the anchorages are empty and there are less crazies on the water.

Give me one horn as you pass me...

...in the slow lane,

Tom
Emily Grace
Nordhavn 46




Homeport: Connecticut Go to Top of Page

JoeBTB

RO# 517

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  09:54:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I love the style of trawlers, but I'm not ready for 6-8 knots -- that's a little TOO slow. Downeast-style semi-displacement is a nice compromise. I get close to 4 mpg at displacement speeds, and 2 mpg at 12 knots, which suits me just fine.

If I had a spare 295k, I'd snap this up in a heartbeat (well, maybe a heart flutter?):



I have the 28' model, but this 40' is beautiful. And rare -- I think they only made about a dozen of them. Drooooooooooooooooooool.



Homeport: Go to Top of Page

inaforty

RO# 8815

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  10:29:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom,
We saw a Nordhavn while cruising around Narragansett Bay this pass summer. I had I tough time not drooling.
Awesome looking boat! The one we saw was a light gray color.


Regards Barry

Edited by - inaforty on Feb 16 2007 10:32:31

Homeport: New Bedford Go to Top of Page

KnottyBuoyz

RO# 20406

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  10:42:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by inaforty

Tom,
We saw a Nordhavn while cruising around Narragansett Bay this pass summer. I had I tough time not drooling.
Awesome looking boat! The one we saw was a light gray color.

Something like this Barry? We crossed paths with this one on the Rideau last summer. Very nice boat and wonderful people!




Rick


Yours Aye!
Rick
"It's not the boat "you built" until you've sworn at it, bled on it, sweated over it, cried beside it and then threatened to haul the POS outside and burn it!"

Homeport: Iroquois, ON Go to Top of Page

ocean

RO# 18039

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  11:16:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We switch from a 36 foot sailboat to a 38 Ocean Alexander trawler the sailboat had an Av. speed of 6 Kts the trawler cruises nicely at 8 Kts. The differnce is I now go in a straight line and have tons more room. we have cruised about 800 miles the last 2 summers and love it.





Acclaim
38 Ocean Alexander

Food is an important part of your diet

Edited by - ocean on Feb 16 2007 11:25:19

Homeport: Toronto On. Go to Top of Page

KiDa

RO# 16492



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  11:48:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As a general observation, I have found folks to be more sailors than boaters. For the most part, they navigate better as they know the odds on getting from A to B w/o darkness in the equation is a long shot. They handle their boats very well in close quarters. They are very laid back and usually older. The way I see it is cruiser folks have money to burn and no time. Trawler folks have time to burn...and money.

____________


Best Regards,

David
Saint Max
'99 330 Sundancer

==========

Capitalism is to this administration what Judaism was to the Third Reich.

-- Me

Homeport: Hopewell, VA Go to Top of Page

oldfishboat

RO# 24623

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  12:19:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

I have included a link to some pics of my conversion in progress. Its a UT ( ugly Trawler ) with a DS (dry stack ) round bilge etc etc.

453 DD ( 90 - 100 BHP ) burns around 2.5 gal an hour at 7.5 knots 1750 -1800 rpm. I carry about 450 IMP gal in a couple of tanks. Range safe around 1200 miles.

Very sea kindly just a nice heavy boat to run in heavy weather. I have never had a lot of success trying to outrun weather so might as well enjoy it if your in it.

Hope the link is OK with Les and such. Some might get a charge outa the old wood boat <grin>

http://www.vancouvermarina.com/ayc-invader.htm

Now if I had some cash a Nord or Duck , passagemaker etc would be my dream boat.


Oldfishboat guy

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

OARLOX

RO# 6476

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  12:51:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've owned both cruiser and trawler style boat. Two different Sea Sport, a 2400XL w/single I/O and a 27 foot Navigator w/twin I/O. Both were wonderful boats! Currently We own a TRUE TRAWLER a Willard 40 foot Pilot House powere by a single 120 Ford Lehman Diesel. The Lady Anne is a full displacement hull with a top end speed of about 8 knots, we cruise at an average speed of 6.8 knots. Owning a trawler is truely a lifestyle. We live and cruise in Alaska where getting in and out of the elements is always an issue! The trawler is warm, stable, comfortable and safe in most normal sea conditions. Did I mention fairly economical? We burn an average of 1.8 gph and this includes running the Gen Set about 50% of the time. This is a figure that I worked out over 3000 miles of cruising. The cruisers were were far better fishing boats for sure. When you want to make a hundred mile run to a fishing spot with the cruiser you just allow a couple of hours extra travel and a couple of hundred dollars for fuel, with the trawler you had to leave yesterday but the cruise allowed you lots of time to drink coffee and listen to your ipod over the Bose Sound system.


Rob Hays
"Lady Anne"
Willard Pilot House 40
Girdwood, Alaska

Edited by - OARLOX on Feb 16 2007 18:48:36

Homeport: Alaska Go to Top of Page

The Other Gary

RO# 143



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  13:08:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I guess I have a bit of a compromise in my boat. twin 330 diesels but I get over two nmpg at hull speed. If I have to run I can easily get 20 knots at 1 mpg. Last spring a run from the Jersey shore to Toronto I put $600 in the tanks and arrived home with more fuel on board than when I started.





Gary Peck 1997 Bayliner 3988 MY, twin 330 Cummins

I saw a movie where only the military and the police had guns,,,,, It was called Schindler's List

Homeport: Toronto, Lake Ontario Go to Top of Page

abalmuth

RO# 13885

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  13:40:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by The Other Gary

Last spring a run from the Jersey shore to Toronto I put $600 in the tanks and arrived home with more fuel on board than when I started.


Sounds like you were smoking more than the cigars on your last trip to cuba


_
Cruisers 5000 Sedan Sport/CAT 12LTR's -
Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright
until you hear them speak.........

Homeport: Long Island, NY Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  14:11:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In their posts above TLawler reports 2-3GPH for 7 kts, Oldfishboat 2.5 GPH at 7.5 KTs Both are between 2-3 NMPG. I get better than 2 NPG on my 44’ Carver aft cabin boat, at 7-8 KTs.

My point is that you need not be restricted to a particular style boat to achieve decent economy at slow speeds. Call it a cruiser, motor yacht or whatever you want but the fuel use is similar to that reported by those special “trawler” operators but I have the benefit of more room. Just because it is named a trawler doesent mean much interms of actual fuel use.



Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

The Other Gary

RO# 143



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  15:02:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Andy, just to clarify, I left NJ with half tanks and fueled up on the Erie canal. I got to Toronto reading over half. Due to an engine problem we shut down the Starbord engine and ran entirely at 8 knots on a single engine with the genny running all the way.



Gary Peck 1997 Bayliner 3988 MY, twin 330 Cummins

I saw a movie where only the military and the police had guns,,,,, It was called Schindler's List

Homeport: Toronto, Lake Ontario Go to Top of Page

oldfishboat

RO# 24623

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  15:07:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yup its all true if ya run slow there be some large savings on the fuel. I have had several older wood express cruisers over the years. 32 foot Grenfell express with a single ford big block. At 1800 rpm and 8.5 knots under 3 gal an hour as an example. Thats a gas boat but it would get up and run at 16 knots all day long or till the next fuel barge <grin>

Also its great to carry like 450 gal fuel but if ya aint using it you are storing it. That can be a real bear or pita.

Then there is that diesels dont like to be underloaded and there can be problems with doing that. For better life running them at or closer to rated rpm is better.

Lots to think about.




Oldfishboat guy

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  15:09:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gary: I too have run on a single as a test, fuel use seems to go to the 3NMPG range but i would have to go a lot further than the 60 mile trip I made on one engine to get good data. I didnt use enough fuel in the 130 Nmi to be certain of the data.


Bruce



Edited by - pdecat on Feb 16 2007 18:50:10

Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  15:10:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ocean and Oarlox please resize your pix.


Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

MEfirst

RO# 21005

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  15:13:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Seems like every boat test you read for a 40 footer (plus or minus) puts them at 2+ mpg at displacement speeds, even if they are planing hulls. If this is true in real life and not just in boat tests, seems like any 40' sedan or convertible would be the best of both worlds. Good economy at slow speeds and the ability to get somewhere fast if you need to.


Homeport: Grand Rapids, MI Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  15:21:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Scott: you got it. Just because the engines can produce a zillion HP doesent mean the boat uses that to go through the water at hull speed. Your logic is how i decided to buy my boat. Best of both worlds. It sound simple but people get all caught up in the trawler marketing hype.


Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

oldfishboat

RO# 24623

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  15:49:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you want to take the next step look at some of the cats. Like a PDQ or such. Not my kinda boat but another great option IMO.

Oldfishboat guy

Homeport: Go to Top of Page

abalmuth

RO# 13885

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  15:53:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
These are the factory specs for my 1999 sedan
according to this chart I should be able to run at idle or a little above 6.5-7.5 knots and get about 3mpg
I only travel at these speeds in no wake zones etc so I never tracked it
I typically run at 21knots at .67-.7 MPG
but i guess if I run at 'trawler' speeds I can get close to a trawlers economy - i'm just not ready for that yet




_
Cruisers 5000 Sedan Sport/CAT 12LTR's -
Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright
until you hear them speak.........

Homeport: Long Island, NY Go to Top of Page

ocean

RO# 18039

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  16:30:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce
Sorry for the photo size I am sending another as a test let me know if its ok



Acclaim
38 Ocean Alexander

Food is an important part of your diet

Homeport: Toronto On. Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  17:06:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
yes Bert much better, thanks.


Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

pdecat

RO# 842



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  18:58:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
oldfish: diesels have died from running hard but as long as they are at proper operating temp not from running easy. That is an oldwives tale. Remember the same most popular ever 5.9L Cummins engine is rated from 150HP to 380HP, so tell me how running that engine easy is a problem??
An interesting Cat spec is time to overhaul. It is spec’ed in gallons of fuel used, 30,000 IIRC. Therein lies the clue to diesel life, use fuel slowly and live forever or quickly for a short happy life. Take your pick.



Bruce



Homeport: Gulf Coast FL Go to Top of Page

Tlawler

RO# 3272

Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  19:55:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the kind words about Nordhavns and their crusty old owners. The one in the picture is a 35 foot model. It's the only coastal cruiser that they make. The mast and crows nest are great for watching for coral bommies in the Carribean.

Mine is a 46. They did make a few of the Nordhavn 46s with a ketch rig sail although mine has only the steadying stail common to many types of trawlers. Emily Grace has a seperate 30 HP diesel wing engine with independant shaft and feathering prop that moves her only about 4 knots in emergencies. I understand that having a main engine failure half way across the Atlantic makes for a very bad experience.

We'll be in Narragansett Bay in late July this summer. Our hull is Stars & Stripes blue with a white bootstripe. Wave if you see us. We love all types of boats.

Tom
M/V Emily Grace



Homeport: Connecticut Go to Top of Page

Dusty Rhoads

RO# 10868



Posted - Feb 16 2007 :  22:42:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rick : I will post some pics, when our guy gets back from China with a progress report. We are going in July when things are about 70% finished, for delivery in Sep07. If you do the Annapolis show, you may see it in person!
General specs can be seen on Yachtworld. and enter Seahorse for manuf. and hit enter. It is a 52 PH and the one now in Hong Kong is similar, however we have made numerous changes to that one.


Dusty "Moon River"

Homeport: Annapolis, MD Go to Top of Page

rtribble

RO# 15208



Posted - Feb 17 2007 :  12:00:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
These are some realy awsome looking boats, I've always liked looks of trawlers and am like Pasco in my perference for the older "traditional" looking boats. However I must say the spacious interiors of the "Euro" style boats are pretty impressive.
If your intended purpose is to go off-shore the full heavy displacement hull is your best choice, if inland/coastal cruising then a semi-displacement hull may be best. My choice would be keyed towards safety and sea kindlyness rather than speed for an off-shore cruiser.



Homeport: Beaver Lake Arkansas Go to Top of Page
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