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 U-Line Ice Makers
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Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Aug 16 2007 :  16:59:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It'll get hot to the touch; you won't be able to keep your hand on it more than a few seconds. But it shouldn't be so hot that you can't touch it at all.

-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

happyhour

RO# 4143

Posted - Aug 17 2007 :  12:52:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just diagnosed a problem with my uline, another failed cold control. It operates the compressor OK but the contacts do not close for the ice eject cycle. I have had to replace micro switches in the past and the off arm overcenter locking piece of metal is so worn that I cannot keep the arm in the up position. Basically it is wearing out yet the compressor section works fine. I was thinking of just buying a universal Ice maker off ebay for about $ 40.00. I would bypass my fill solenoid and disconnect the cold control connection to the ice maker. Seems like this might work fine assuming that the unit will physically fit (yet to be measured). Has anyone done this in the past?


Homeport: Newport Beach, Ca Go to Top of Page

GPAUL

RO# 11873

Posted - Sep 03 2007 :  12:28:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic I have a U-line BI 95 ice maker that still works. I only run it a few weeks a year. It has an extremely small leak that needs R12 about once a year and then only a quick puff. I have looked for leaks in the obvious spots, but have decided it must be in the condensor coil. I have tried with a detector, but still have not found anything.

Do you have any thoughts on how to proceed?

Also, U-line said the unit requires 3 oz of R12 and the low side should operate between 1 to 5 psi. This seems low??

Thanks, Paul



Homeport: JAX, FL Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Sep 03 2007 :  21:21:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The most common place for a refrigerant leak (sorry to say) is at the rear of the unit, where the copper refrigerant lines come up the back of the cabinet and are joined to the aluminum tubing coming out of the evaporator. There is a sharp 90 degree bend at this point, and the aluminum and copper tubing are joined via a crimp-type joint. You'll have to cut away the black rubatex insulation in the area of where the refrigerant lines go into the rear of the cabinet (at the top). Then do a leak test with a halogen-type leak detector. I'll bet you a good cigar that you'll find the leak there.

How to repair it? Turn the machine off and leave it off for several hours. When everything has come up to room temperature and is good and dry, cut away the stiff shrink-tubing that covers the joint in question. Then gook up the area with two-part epoxy and let it set up overnight before turning the machine back on. There's a special low temperature epoxy available that's just for that type of repair job. You can get it in places like United Refrigeration. I've used it in the past and have had good results with it. Then replace the black rubatex insulation and turn the machine back on. You should be good to go.


-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

AustinPaul

RO# 17353



Posted - Jan 09 2008 :  12:21:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Vic Willman

David, on the bottom of the cover are two notches. You put screwdriver blade in one of them and twist it. Have no fear, you usually wind up cracking the cover when you remove it. But it doesn't actually "break" - it just cracks a little in one of the corners.

The motor is MUCH easier to change out than replacing the whole icemaker unit. It can be changed out in about 20 minutes - you'll need a couple wire nuts to do the job - the factory uses "crimp-on wire nuts" that will be destroyed when you remove them. Orange wire nuts should be the right size - get the small ones, not those with the wings on them. Just two screws to change out the actual motor, and the wire nuts to join the motor wires with the rest of the wires inside.

Changing the whole icemaker unit out will require at least a twelve pack - and maybe a few shots of Jack; also be sure there are no women present within hearing range, and it'll likely take 2-3 hours. Contrary to what most women seem to think, swearing actually does help...!

Hey there Vic. Happy New Year to you.

I have acquired a new-to-me boat with the U-Line BI-95. I haven't had a chance to monitor it too closely yet, but it seems that the cubes are not being ejected without my giving the wire arm a little jiggle. It then goes down and appears to start another cycle. Does that sound like a bad ejector motor?

It's an '87 vintage with a few rust spots inside, so I was just thinking about starting fresh with a new icemaker, but it sounds like, given the hassle of replacing it, I should at least give repair a try first-- yes?

Many thanks for your invaluable help here!

Paul


*************************
"SNARE'D"

Homeport: Austin, Texas Go to Top of Page

Ted Williams

RO# 22065



Posted - Jan 09 2008 :  21:22:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic, I have the same problem as Navman, above: the water appears to run down the back of the icemaker (on the inside) and freeze along the back wall and under the bucket. Is there a seal that could be leaking? I have tried adjusting the cube size to smaller cubes and it doesn't seem to help.

After running for awhile, there will be a 1/2" of ice on the back inside wall and under the ice bucket.

Thanks, Ted


Ted Williams
Silverton 442 / Cat 3126's
Topsail Island, NC

Homeport: Topsail Island, NC Go to Top of Page

Mike McManus

RO# 958

Posted - Jan 10 2008 :  08:41:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic I bought an old u-line ice maker. in order to trigger the action and make it work, or see if it ran i removed the larg gear on the front of the ice maker. I turened the gear and it was off and running, seem to be working great. My question is what possition should the fingers be in when the ice is beeing made, mine is stopping in the straight up possition.


Homeport: Port charlotte , Florida Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Jan 10 2008 :  14:29:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Paul, the wire arm opens and closes a microswitch inside that turns on and turns off the ejector portion of the machine. Given that it's 20 years old, I'd guess that the microswitch is hanging up and needs to be replaced. The trick is getting access to it. First, turn off the machine. Then remove the cover from the front of the ice mold mechanism inside the machine (put screw driver in slot at bottom of cover, then twist). Next, remove the 3 screws that hold the metal plate with the gear, etc. on it in place. From the top of the metal plate, bend the metal plate outward like a door on a hinge.

You'll see a little bump on the wire shutoff arm that contacts a switch, mounted inside the "black box." That switch is most likely the the cuplrit. It's a standard micro switch, about $5 or $6 at Radio Shack. Note where the wires go before disconnecting them, as the new switch will have a terminal that doesn't get used. The old one may also have this unused terminal, or it may not, depending on the age of the unit. Remove the switch from the black box, and install the new one. If there is a spacer installed behind the switch, be sure to replace it with the new switch. Reconnect the wires.

Now, slowly push the metal plate back into position, note that the "tang" on the end of the wire arm MUST go through a small hole in the metal plate, and the spring attached to it must be tucked inside the black box - the spring simply presses against the side of the inside of the black box. Then turn the machine on and see what happens. It should now work correctly.


-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Jan 10 2008 :  14:44:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ted, there are two possibilities - let's hope it's the first one.

1) The fill tube at the rear of the ice mold unit may be misaligned and the water is splashing out of the mold as it fills. Locate the fill tube and watch it at the end of the ejection cycle, when the water comes in. If the water is splashing out, grab the fill tube with a pair of pliers and realign it. It is simply held in place with a thick lump of putty, pressed in from the rear side of the cabinet, and is fairly easy to move around.

2) If that isn't the case, it is most likely a burned out mold heater. Listen when the machine shuts off and switches to the ejection cycle. If it takes more than 7-10 minutes to complete the ejection cycle, drop the cubes, add water, and compressor and fan start back up, you've likely got a burned out mold heater. Replacing it will require a service technician and a new mold. The heater is part of the mold assembly, and cannot be replaced by itself.

What happens if the mold heater is burned out, is that the cubes stay inside the mold until the interior of the actual compartment warms up enough that they loosen on their own. The compressor and fan stay turned off until the ejection cycle has completed, regardless of how long it takes - possibly as much as an hour. After the cubes have finally loosened, it will continue the ejection cycle, push the cubes out, add water, then park, and the cooldown cycle will start back up. When this happens, all the frost inside the machine melts, and runs down to the bottom and causes an accumulation of ice there.



-- The Head Master --

Edited by - Vic Willman on Jan 10 2008 14:51:25

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Jan 10 2008 :  14:47:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, the fingers should be anywhere between 12 o'clock and 2 o'clock, when in the parked position during the cooldown cycle. So it sounds as though everything is OK.

-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

AustinPaul

RO# 17353



Posted - Jan 11 2008 :  09:59:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Vic Willman

Paul, the wire arm opens and closes a microswitch inside that turns on and turns off the ejector portion of the machine. Given that it's 20 years old, I'd guess that the microswitch is hanging up and needs to be replaced. The trick is getting access to it. First, turn off the machine. Then remove the cover from the front of the ice mold mechanism inside the machine (put screw driver in slot at bottom of cover, then twist). Next, remove the 3 screws that hold the metal plate with the gear, etc. on it in place. From the top of the metal plate, bend the metal plate outward like a door on a hinge.

You'll see a little bump on the wire shutoff arm that contacts a switch, mounted inside the "black box." That switch is most likely the the cuplrit. It's a standard micro switch, about $5 or $6 at Radio Shack. Note where the wires go before disconnecting them, as the new switch will have a terminal that doesn't get used. The old one may also have this unused terminal, or it may not, depending on the age of the unit. Remove the switch from the black box, and install the new one. If there is a spacer installed behind the switch, be sure to replace it with the new switch. Reconnect the wires.

Now, slowly push the metal plate back into position, note that the "tang" on the end of the wire arm MUST go through a small hole in the metal plate, and the spring attached to it must be tucked inside the black box - the spring simply presses against the side of the inside of the black box. Then turn the machine on and see what happens. It should now work correctly.

Big thanks Vic. I am printing this to take with me down to the boat.

Paul


*************************
"SNARE'D"

Homeport: Austin, Texas Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Jan 11 2008 :  10:04:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Paul, have fun, and good luck with it! While I was writing up the answer, I dug out an old U-Line mold assembly to look over and refresh my memory - it's been a while since I worked on one. But the info I gave you should be accurate.



-- The Head Master --

Edited by - Vic Willman on Jan 11 2008 10:08:14

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

Ted Williams

RO# 22065



Posted - Jan 11 2008 :  22:34:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic, many thanks!! I'll check the fill tube and ejection cycle on my next trip to the boat (hopefully next week).

This is really helpful, thanks.

Ted


Ted Williams
Silverton 442 / Cat 3126's
Topsail Island, NC

Homeport: Topsail Island, NC Go to Top of Page

davita

RO# 16378

Posted - Jan 13 2008 :  08:49:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Reading these posts about ice-makers makes me realize my Martini ice cubes have melted. You see, I'm sitting near the swim-up pool in the Kartika Plaza in Kuta Beach, Bali.... and the temp. is 83*F. Now where is that pretty waitress?
The dockmaster at my marina in Vancouver has just emailed all tenants that he is shutting off the water due to a freeze warning. I did not winterize my U-line, just switched it off, so, fingers X-sed.
David



Homeport: Vancouver Go to Top of Page

navman

RO# 16259

Posted - Jan 30 2008 :  14:33:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
David, forget the ice maker on the boat and get them cubes refreshed, now tell me about the waitress :-)


Homeport: Tacoma Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Jan 30 2008 :  16:10:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The compressor will get good and hot after it's run for a few hours. You can touch it, but you can't keep your hand on it. Also check that the fan is running at full speed. When it's running, the blade should be just a blur - you shouldn't be able to see it clearly. Sometimes dust and dirt will get into the fan motor bearings and slow down the fan, causing the compressor to overheat.

-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

davita

RO# 16378

Posted - Feb 21 2008 :  17:39:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic...I've not been on the forum in a while coz cruising with some friends on a 66 ft Alaskan, currently in El Cid marina, in Mazatlan MX.
They have a problem with their U-lane combo CO29FB, about 5 years old, and hoping you can help. They tell me it has always been a problem...so here is their explanation of the issue..
The water enters normally but drains from the front of the ice tray. They have turned the fill adjuster to a lower setting, as you have previously advised on this topic, but it still spills and causes an ice stallegn(t)ite to form at the front of the ice maker part of the combo.
I'm thinking that they should shim the front of the machine, but the deck is already convex and appears to permit the ice-maker to lean aft.
We would love to hear your opinion. I've said that ...given an airline ticket.....you might consider to come and fix... but I'm sure that you are toooooo busy!
I'm watching the sports-fishing guys on the dock carving dorado and marlin...all that blood and guts makes me feel sick!...... so i'm having a margareta.
david



Homeport: Vancouver Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Feb 26 2008 :  09:29:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
David, sorry I missed your posting and didn't answer sooner. What I suspect might be the problem is the solenoid valve. The solenoid valve is a water valve that is opened and closed via an electric solenoid. As the machine goes through the harvest cycle (ejecting the cubes), there is a cam inside that rotates along with the ejection "fingers," etc. When it reaches a certain point in the cycle it activates the water valve switch, which sends power to the solenoid valve, opening it to let water come in for the next batch of cubes. It usually remains open for about 5 seconds or so, then closes. However, sometimes this valve doesn't close tightly, and water seeps beyond it. The water trickles into the rear of the ice mold, and eventually overfills it. It could take several hours sometimes, especially when the ice bin is full and the machine isn't cycling. The water will run out the drain hole that is drilled in the side of the ice mold. That's what that is - a drain hole. The solenoid valve should be located, removed (turn off the electric power first - at the circuit breaker, not just via the on-off switch on the machine), disassembled, and cleaned - then reassembled.

The problem is that on the Combo units, the solenoid valve is at the very rear of the machine, and it will have to be pulled out of any cabinetry where it is mounted, to get to it. Another problem: cleaning the valve doesn't always solve the problem and sometimes the valve must be replaced. They aren't all that expensive, and they can call U-Line and order one. They'll ship to just about anywhere in the world. After cleaning and re-installing the valve, it is best to try and run the machine for at least a few hours with the water line connected and turned on, before re-mounting it in the cabinetry - to be sure water isn't still passing through it.

Another possibility is that the water valve switch that activates the solenoid valve may be bad and "stuck on" all the time. However, they'd have a flooding situation if that were the situation, so I doubt that it is the problem. Plus, with the machine only being approx. 5 years old, it isn't likely that the switch has failed this soon. They're normally good for 10(+) years before they start acting up.



-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

davita

RO# 16378

Posted - Feb 27 2008 :  21:19:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic,
I flew home last night from Puerto Vallarta and left my friends to continue their cruise.
We de-frosted the combo icemaker and I showed them how to open the unit to lubricate everything, as you have previously advised. The unit works well and has not lumped up yet, but it is now being used a lot.
My friends are not members of the forum but I will copy/paste and email your reply.
Many thanks
David



Homeport: Vancouver Go to Top of Page

bobalong

RO# 19429

Posted - Dec 14 2008 :  19:04:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just recently acquired a U Line ice maker in my new to me 93 boat. The ice maker makes ice in a timely fashion (full cycle in just a few minutes) But there is a very small drip, all the way toward the rear of the cube mechanism, on the cube tray side, it drips just enough to put about an inch to an inch and a half of water in the tray. (ultimately it is ice) during the course of filling the bin to the top. I have tried adjusting the cube sizer to the negative, but it didn't seem to make any difference in the cube size (made half turn increments) all I can figure is the excessive city water pressure (80-90 PSI) is too much. Unit is level. Shut off valve doesn't let any water pass after filling tray. There is no additional water after the bin is full and ceases making ice.

Also the black finish is flaking off of the cub mold, looks like paint chips on the surface of the cubes, what are those chips ?



Homeport: Sutherrrn Indianannna Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Dec 15 2008 :  10:25:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Bob; yes the water pressure is about twice what it should be, and my guess is that it's overfilling the mold. The water fill is timed by a rotating cam when the maching is going through the ejection cycle. So with twice the water pressure that you should have, you're going to get much more water into the mold during the same elapsed time. You'll need to get a pressure regulator on the incoming water supply to the boat. Pressure that high is unsafe, and it could also cause a line on the boat to break or pop loose. The regulator will knock the pressure down to the standard 40-50 PSI. They aren't all that expensive, see following links:

http://www.boatfix.com/bypage2index.asp?page=588
http://www.boatfix.com/catalog/588.pdf

The black chips are from the epoxy lining inside the ice mold. This is caused by winterized the machine in the past with RV anti-freeze.

No anti-freeze of any kind should ever be used to winterize an icemaker, as it attacks the epoxy lining of the mold. Your mold needs to be replaced. Eventually, you'll start getting flecks of aluminum oxide from the mold captured inside your ice cubes. Consumption of too much aluminum is one of the suspected causes of Alzheimer's disease.

Correct Winterization: The machine should have the water supply disconnected from it, and the plastic tube removed from the bottom of the water supply valve. The machine should then be allowed to run for about 2 hours without any water attached to it. Turn the machine off and allow the inside to thaw. Wipe up any moisture that results from the inside thawing. Then prop the door open at least an inch, and leave the machine dry for the winter.

In the spring, reconnect both lines to the water supply valve and restore power to the machine.





-- The Head Master --

Edited by - Vic Willman on Dec 15 2008 10:27:05

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

bobalong

RO# 19429

Posted - Dec 15 2008 :  13:41:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Vic, and thanks for your reply. I am assuming that replacing the mold tray is going to be a job that requires disconnecting & evacuating of refrigeration lines and then re attaching same ??

The ice maker has been removed from the boat and is in my shop (hence the high water pressure). If repairing it requires disconnecting the refrigeration lines and a lot of parts expense, then I am going to see if my appliance parts supplier has any suggestions for a epoxy coating or similar that may extend the life of the mold, even if I have to re coat it every season or two.

I am glad you made me aware of the potential hazards of ingesting aluminum.

All else fails, i will have a nice sized ICE Cream freezer. Not near as cool as an ice maker though.

Thanks Bob



Homeport: Sutherrrn Indianannna Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Dec 15 2008 :  15:20:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob, actually no. On a U-Line machine, it's just a matter of unbolting the existing mold assembly, removing it and bolting in the new one. The refrigeration lines don't get distrubed (only on the Raritan-built units). The only thing is that there is a complete wiring harness on a U-Line unit that needs to be spliced back into the original harness. But the wires are all color-coded, so it shouldn't be too daunting of a job. Your best bet would be to replace the complete icemaker unit that goes inside the machine, rather than just the mold and heater unit. A ballpark guess for the cost is somewhere around $150.00 for the complete icemaker unit.

Note: on the newer Raritan-built icemakers, it is no longer necessary to disturb the refrigeration lines when replacing the icemaker unit inside the machine. The change went into effect about a year ago.



-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

bobalong

RO# 19429

Posted - Dec 15 2008 :  16:53:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic, once again a big thank you. My RV place that I obtain parts from had told me refrigeration lines were going to be an issue. When I called back, the parts guy this time asked one of the technicians, and they repeated what you said. No refrigeration line issues.

So now the RV place had to call the parts distributor to get part info. And I am waiting for a return call. The tenative price I was quoted was $257.50 for the complete assembly. I am losing faith in the RV place, so I will be trying somewhere else for the part.

But that is just the way it is in so many places these days. It's like going to Auto Zone or any of those franchise auto parts stores. (the exception around here seems to be NAPA, but I think they are mostly independently owned). If it ain't on the computer screen, then it doesn't exist.

I will keep you posted.

Thanks Again, Bob



Homeport: Sutherrrn Indianannna Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Dec 16 2008 :  08:55:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow!!! That price sounds pretty inflated...

Bob, try calling one of these two places (Indiana):

All Brand Parts
800-252-7500

Appliance Parts Depot
800-527-2343



-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

bobalong

RO# 19429

Posted - Dec 16 2008 :  09:53:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, I ordered the part today from Appliance Parts Depot, $165.00 plus about 8 bucks shipping. Said they had 40- or 50 in stock. I tried to remove this assembly to lube, clean and see if I could determine the source of the leak a few weeks ago. Couldn't see how to get it apart very far, and I was convinced that the refrigeration tubes were soldered to it, so I stopped. When I receive the new assembly I will be able to see exactly how it all is attached.

Any secrets to removal ?



Homeport: Sutherrrn Indianannna Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Dec 16 2008 :  13:03:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
3 screws under the mold; 2 screws that hang it to the inside of the cabinet on the left side. Then, you'll need a putty knife to pry it loose from the evaporator "shelf." There will be "alumilastic" sealant between the evaporator shelf and the bottom of the ice mold unit. Simply reuse what is already there.

Note: the thermostat probe comes in from the rear of the machine, into a small tube that is part of the ice mold unit - be careful not to bend this tube when handling the ice mold unit. You must have access to the rear of the machine, to pull out the thermostat probe from the rear. Then there's the issue of the wires. They also, are spliced in from the rear of the machine. When re-installing the thermostat probe, push it all the way in, until it "bottoms" inside the tube.



-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

bobalong

RO# 19429

Posted - Dec 24 2008 :  12:22:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic:

Just an update. . . . received the new ice maker assembly. Hope to install it this weekend. Also it came with a large tube of Alumilastic sealer to make installation easier. Thanks.



Homeport: Sutherrrn Indianannna Go to Top of Page

Captain Crunch

RO# 6460

Posted - Jan 04 2009 :  12:21:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic,
Need to join in this rather long thread of U-LIne problems. I have a model 95 Ice maker and it will not cool the box at all. When I first power it up the fan will run for a minute or two then stop. The cube harvester in the box is slightly warm to the touch and can feel the slight vibration, thus unit is getting power. There is no sound from the compressor or motor as I have the front panel grill removed and can hear the fan behind for a short minute but that's it.
Any ideas as to what is failing?
tks
cc



Homeport: Olympia, Washington Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Jan 05 2009 :  08:54:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sounds like a bad limit switch (part # 109). This is basically a one-time fuse. When it "pops," the unit hangs up in mid-ejection cycle, with the fan and compressor turned off. In essence, the machine doesn't do anything at all, and for all intents and purposes, is "dead." Replacing the limit switch will most likely solve the problem. It is located in the ice mold unit, behind the metal plate with all the switches on it. It is right in the center of the "black box" when you fold the metal plate back. It kind of looks like a little thermostat, but is actually a fuse.

Unless you're comfortable working with electricity, I'd suggest you get a technician to work on it.



-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

bobalong

RO# 19429

Posted - Jan 05 2009 :  21:25:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic, final update !!

Installed the new cube mechanism this evening and everything seems fine. I didn't hook it up to water, but as soon as I powered it up, it cycled. It ejected the non existent cubes, arm came up and checked ice bin level and I heard the water switch come on momentarily to fill the cube tray. Then the compressor and fan came on and it began to cool.

I have to thank you again for your help. Your explanations made everthing come together.



Homeport: Sutherrrn Indianannna Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Jan 06 2009 :  08:48:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sounds good! Now, as long as your thermostat (cold control) is good, the machine should function properly for a good, long time. Good job!



-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

jhowenstine

RO# 14337

Posted - Jan 27 2009 :  14:31:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic
Is there a way to test the cold control thermostat?
My Uline SP18 stays very cold on the inside but it never ejects the cubes. The motor on the cube ejector works fine, it fills with water etc. Sometimes it will make one or 2 batches of cubes in a 24 hour period



Homeport: Port Clinton OH Go to Top of Page

Y2K996

RO# 17794

Posted - Jan 28 2009 :  14:39:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic,

My U-Line icemaker (I think it's a BI-95) was working OK until recently when my automatic water pump pressure switch broke and left the water pump running constantly. I shut off the icemaker until I could replace the water pump. After replacing the water pump, I turned the icemaker on and left the boat. As I was leaving I heard the water pump cycle for about five seconds but didn't really think about it. Next time I boarded the boat the icemaker was warm inside and the ice bin was full of water. I shut the icemaker off and went for a cocktail. Any suggestions besides more cocktails?

Nick


1993 Carver 350 Aft Cabin
MMSI# 338066392

Homeport: Longboat Key, FL Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Jan 28 2009 :  15:23:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim, you're describing the classic symptom of a failed thermostat (cold control). That's the most common failure with the machine. A replacement costs somewhere between $75 and $100, through U-Line.

-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Jan 28 2009 :  15:27:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nick, what position were the ejector fingers in, the ones that push out the cubes? their normal position is pointing nearly straight up in the air. There are a couple of possibilities, but those possibilities hinge on what position the fingers are in.



-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

Y2K996

RO# 17794

Posted - Jan 31 2009 :  13:26:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The fingers were in the down position. However, when I turn the power switch on the fingers move continually and water keeps being added to the mold. The compressor makes no noise and it is not cooling at all.

1993 Carver 350 Aft Cabin
MMSI# 338066392

Homeport: Longboat Key, FL Go to Top of Page

Y2K996

RO# 17794

Posted - Jan 31 2009 :  14:48:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The fingers were in the down position. However, when I turn the power switch on the fingers move continually and water keeps being added to the mold. The compressor makes no noise and it is not cooling at all.

1993 Carver 350 Aft Cabin
MMSI# 338066392

Homeport: Longboat Key, FL Go to Top of Page

Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Feb 02 2009 :  09:46:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nick, either the Holding Switch has failed, and is stuck, or the thermostat (cold control) is stuck in the ejection mode. The holding switch is a common microswitch, located behind the metal plate where the white gear wheel is. It is activated by the rotating cam back there. There is a wiring diagram sticker on the inside of the square white cover on the front of the ice mold unit, to aid you in locating the holding switch. Check to be sure the little plunger on the switch can move in and out, that it isn't stuck in the "in" positon. If it is stuck, it will have to be replaced. You can get a suitable replacement at any Radio Shack for less than $10. Wait until you get the new one before removing the old one, so you don't get the wires mixed up. When putting the metal plate back in position, note that there is a spring attached to the wire bail arm that checks the ice level in the ice bucket. The spring has a tang on it, that must go into a hole in the metal plate, before it will go back together properly. If replacing the holding switch doesn't solve the problem, it is the cold control, which is only available from U-Line or one of their service outlets. Expect to pay between $75 and $100 for one of those.



-- The Head Master --

Edited by - Vic Willman on Feb 02 2009 09:50:41

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

boatbum

RO# 36

Posted - Apr 12 2009 :  12:09:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Vic, a very informative thread you are hosting here. Quite a bit to be learned. We have a 2 year old CO29.
Over the last two years it's been a pita. Initially the fill tube was not installed correctly and it leaked all over the place. That was fun, and it enhanced my ability to include diverse technical assertions in my dialog.
After this it was running water down the back and by cutting back on the supply of water via the adjustment things were going well.
Then the whole unit frosted up and the icemaker seized up on the ejection. I busted up all the ice with a hair dryer and freed things up. We thought we were out of the woods and then the ice started building up again. Water is filling the tub and freezing up the bottom two inches of the tub.
So using the info herein, I pulled the cover off and observed. Eventually the compressor shut down and the fingers started to move. I believe the heater is ok since the cubes freed up but did not fall. I think they were good size and joined together as usual. So I waited hoping to hear them fall.
Nothing.
Looking in, the cubes were smaller now. I wiggled the gears and they took off completing the cycle.
Something is jammed up but not always since there were some cubes on top of the ice in the tub. But the cycle is definitely slowed down on the eject and I am wondering if either the motor is toast or something is binding.

By the way there is this screw with a red with a red label that states "remove this screw and you die" actually it voids the warrantee. What's it do?
Can I pull the plate out and have a look for binding hdwr back there?

Update:

Pulled out the motor panel and had a peek. The fingers bind up a bit but I suspect this was due to a refreeze of the cubes that were melted when it jammed up. Letting it cycle some more to see if it hangs in the same spot.
Given the motor has some built in gear reduction is it possible they were mangled when the frost seized things up?

Update 2:

On the next cycle there were good sized cubes coming up but it seemed to hang up at the same spot. Looking at the gears they would move a tick and return back, move forward a tick and pop back. This continued. I took all the ice out of the mold and there was a small piece at the far end. One cube was broken into a couple of pieces. Once cleared out it moved along and the fingers pointed up. I can't see this being caused by the broken cube since it was on the uphill side and not sitting on the rake the fingers move through? It also came out quite easily.

Update 3:

So waiting on the next cycle, we heard the compressor shut down (actually the S.O. who likes cold soda and was a significant contributor to the emphasis on this project heard the shut down). Upon openging the door I could see the fingers had moved around and made contact with the ice which had yet to be released. The gears were exhibiting the same behavior I outlined above but at a different spot. Watching intently, the ice broke free and started to come out but then hung up at the same spot as before. Looking closely with a flashlight, I saw that the innermost cube was hung up on the alignment tang for the water trough feeding the mold. This tang had been out of whack all along. So I pulled the whole deal apart and managed to remount the trough.

What was happening was this; the ice was hanging up at a point the heater was active. So the cubes melted and when the water came on it overflowed. I'm thinking one of the cubes was being crushed all along. This then led to overfilling and extra water.
We'll see but I'm optimistic.

End of Story!

The tub was almost full this morning and all of the cubes fell out when I poured the tub into our cooler! I was also able to increase the cube size and set the cool down cycle to a warmer settting.

Vic and everyone thanks for all the informative leads. Everything fell together and all of the cubes fell apart instead of being a massive chunk.



Edited by - boatbum on Apr 13 2009 18:31:34

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Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Apr 14 2009 :  16:36:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dan, I had to laugh about your description of the warning label that said, "Remove this screw and you die!" That screw is there to act as a stop, limiting how far you can adjust the horizontal spring-loaded screw immediately above it. The horizontal screw is the water level adjustment screw, that regulates how much water comes into the ice mold when the water valve opens. You'll see that it has a + and - stamped into the plate, indicating more water or less water to come into the ice mold. The spring-loaded screw moves a metal arm that can only go as far in the + direction as the ("you die") screw that we're discussing.

The switch that controls the incoming water valve is attached to the metal arm and is activated when the red cam behind the metal plate reaches a certain spot in its rotation. If you remove the "you die" screw, the water adjustment can be extended to where the water valve will stay open all the time and not shut off once the cam reaches that point, even though the cam will continue to rotate. This will cause the incoming water to overflow the mold and run out under the door onto the floor.

It is a conceivable possibility that if your storage tank(s) contain enough water, and the boat remains unattended long enough, the boat could eventually "go a-glub!" (Eastern Somalian, loosely translated, "Dummy's boat just sunk at the dock!"). It could, at the very least, soak your carpeting and make a helluva mess to clean up.



-- The Head Master --

Edited by - Vic Willman on Apr 14 2009 16:57:33

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

boatbum

RO# 36

Posted - Apr 14 2009 :  21:37:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vic glad you had a chuckle over it .
Given all of the good updates herein, and the manual, I knew what the spring loaded screw did, and when looking at the plate when I had it out to remove the finger axel assembly, nothing clicked on the warrantee death screw.
There certainly are a few pitfalls with the machine aren't there? We know about the flooding deal. In the frost episode I talked to above the mechanism actually stopped the cam on the fill portion of the cycle. Water was all over the aft deck and the S.O. was complaining about not having cold soda again. I'm not sure which was worse.
We were lucky since we are on the boat all the time now and the unit is on the aft deck which drains over the side.

But I'm still in for a new tub since I've beaten it to release some frozen cubes and ice, and the door seal has already cracked and is growing mildew. The original unit that was 20+ years old had neither issue.



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Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Apr 17 2009 :  08:23:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dan, as the prophet said, "They don't build 'em like they used to..."

You can get a new ice bucket and door gasket from U-Line (800) 779-2547.



-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

boatbum

RO# 36

Posted - Jul 20 2009 :  18:33:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Eyaaahhhh!

The S.O. used 409 on the inside of the box and now it's all yellowed after sitting a couple of months.. Is there something we can use on it to clear out the yellowing?



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Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Jul 24 2009 :  14:33:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I haven't a clue on that one... Sandpaper? Pepsodent?

My area is makin' 'em work - whut they look like "ain't" in my job derskripshun...!

The inside of the box is part of the refrigeration evaporator, which is powder-coated white refrigerator enamel; it shouldn't have stained. The plastic parts and the door gasket, I've no idea how to get the yellow off of them.

For getting rid of the mildew in the cracks and crevices, and from the door gasket, I've had real good luck with Dow Tub and Tile Cleaner in the aerosol can, with "Scrubbing Bubbles."



-- The Head Master --

Edited by - Vic Willman on Jul 24 2009 14:39:55

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

boatbum

RO# 36

Posted - Nov 07 2009 :  16:49:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ok, it was a mildew or mold. Sorry I did not respond, we have most of it out with a cleaner. Windex or something like it as I recall.
So we had the block ice issue again and this time it turned out to be a bad water filter was dumping sediment. I replaced the filter, buttoned things up and cleaned up more parts put it back together and turned down the temperature again. All was well and we decided to take a day off boat work and go to the park.
When we came back I opted for a glass of wine which we keep in (you probably new this was coming) the Uline. It was flat dead and stuck in the eject cycle. So after pulling the unit out to probe behind the back cover (I know I should have read this thread first) I went after the limit switch.
I had the cover off the motor box set up my probes and when I turned the switch on the unit comes to life. My wife had to stop me from throwing it over the side.
I think we are going to chaulk this up to a balky limit switch and try to locate one nearby (Lake Worth Fla.). Boat Owners Wharehouse had the ice bucket (40 effin 5 effin dollars) and a spare solenoid/valve so at least we have that. Coincidentally I installed the new ice bucket today. I'm thinking the unit misses the old bucket.
It may yet meet up with it again. In a freakin' dumpster.



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Vic Willman

RO# 3655

Posted - Nov 11 2009 :  09:36:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Any idea how old the unit is? Sometimes they reach a point where it is no longer practical to try and repair them. When the limit switch fails, it will usually stop midway through the ejection cycle, and for all intents and purposes, the machine is "dead" - it won't do anything at all. Bypassing the limit switch is one way to check it out - if it works when the limit switch is jumped out, you've got a bad limit switch. The limit switch basically, is a one-time fuse. It is located in the center of the "black box," behind the metal switch plate. In the older versions it was round, about the size of a quarter, and silver-colored, sort of resembling a thermostat. In the newer versions, it is black in color, and is sort of oblong in shape. Jumping across it is the basic way to do the test.



-- The Head Master --

Homeport: Millville, NJ Go to Top of Page

boatbum

RO# 36

Posted - Nov 11 2009 :  10:27:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Vic, been there done that. I've learned more about this unit than I ever wanted to. It's only 3 years old and I have been on the phone with U-line support. I am hoping to receive a new icemaker assembly later this week.
As it turns out I replaced the limit switch with a new one and while it was a different part number it worked. Not only that it resets and once the tray cools down the unit will start up again. I have also changed out the solenoid valve a micro switch and the tub.
The reason for the drip this time I believe is because the unit is heating too long. That is because the mold is shot and all sorts of crap is coming out with the ice. I used a mirror to get in there and look around. It looks very bad.
When I explained to U-line that we paid as much as we did three years ago, they talked amoungst themselves and committed to shipping out a new ice maker. I am paying for expidited shipping since we are on the move.
At this point we use the machine as a frige and leave the ice maker off.
To summarize the saga of this unit, we paid 1140 for it 6/2006. It had three half year seasons on it. In that time we had to;
Fix the alignment of the trough on the mold because water was spilling down the back of the unit. This froze up and made a genuine mess of things.
Next, the seals on the door failed. They're cracked in a few spots. They still function but they are on the list.
In search of this latest failure indicated by block ice, I found the limit switch was cutting off. Once while I was probing it cooled down enough to reset and the unit started up again. Since I thought this was a one time fuse deal, I was going to call it a baulky switch. However I looked it up online with the switch mfg. and it is supposed to reset and close again. I guess this is a fail safe for over heating the tray. But eventually this switch did not reset so I went and got another one along with micro switches.
Having swapped out all of these and the valve, I was convinced something else was going on. I got out my handy mirror and looked around enough to see the ridges in the mold rotting away and that's when I blew my stack and called U-line. I am still shocked the mold failed so early in the life of the unit.
The dialog with U-line was professional and we all stayed calm. He quoted me the price of the mold and icemaker and I turned to Deb and said do you want to spend any more on this unit? She said no. I told the rep. that I could go buy a small freezer for 200 bucks. In fact we have an Avanti 3 or 4 cu. ft. on the boat this year. At fully 1/6 the cost of this unit less all the repair parts and time. We have paid in total about 1500 for this unit so far. When he heard that he went to the supervisors and some heads came together saying they would give me a new ice maker to install in the unit.
We have always been good to the hardware on the boat. We used air to blow out the system every year since 2000. So we have no idea what led to the early failure of the mold.
Perhaps it was the extra heat required when the trough was out of line and crushed ice at the rear of the mold jammed it until enough melted. The water going into the unit is pre filtered by an AquaPure AP517 filter system.

With that, it looks like I am going to learn yet more about this box and install a completely new icemaker.



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davita

RO# 16378

Posted - Nov 12 2009 :  05:12:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Reading boatbums report has inspired me to respond to my previous post:

"They have a problem with their U-lane combo CO29FB, about 5 years old, and hoping you can help. They tell me it has always been a problem...so here is their explanation of the issue..
The water enters normally but drains from the front of the ice tray. They have turned the fill adjuster to a lower setting, as you have previously advised on this topic, but it still spills and causes an ice stallegn(t)ite to form at the front of the ice maker part of the combo.
I'm thinking that they should shim the front of the machine, but the deck is already convex and appears to permit the ice-maker to lean aft."

The problem above turned out to be similar to boatbums....there was a hole in the mold! Before the water could freeze it would slowly drip out of the mold and cause a long run of frozen water.

Hope this helps others to identify a problem if its similar.

David



Homeport: Vancouver Go to Top of Page

boatbum

RO# 36

Posted - Nov 12 2009 :  05:54:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
David thanks for posting. Did they replace the icemaker assembly or the mold?


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